19 votes

A completely upgradeable laptop

9 comments

  1. [3]
    Deimos
    Link
    Ars posted a pretty in-depth review of it yesterday too: Review: Framework’s lightweight modular laptop is a winner

    Ars posted a pretty in-depth review of it yesterday too: Review: Framework’s lightweight modular laptop is a winner

    12 votes
    1. [2]
      MeckiSpaghetti
      Link Parent
      I wish there were more details regarding battery life in the review.

      I wish there were more details regarding battery life in the review.

      2 votes
      1. MeckiSpaghetti
        Link Parent
        Okay, the page does some lazy loading, had to scroll down and wait to "extend" the content a few times before being able to search for the word "hours". In case anyone is interested: We believe...

        Okay, the page does some lazy loading, had to scroll down and wait to "extend" the content a few times before being able to search for the word "hours". In case anyone is interested:

        We believe that battery life is the closest thing to a true Achilles' heel for the Framework laptop. In PCMark 10 Modern Office battery testing—which includes a mix of office applications, streaming video chat, and desktop idle workloads—the Framework doesn't quite hit nine hours of runtime, despite its solid 55Wh battery capacity.

        It could be worse!

        3 votes
  2. [2]
    AugustusFerdinand
    (edited )
    Link
    Very cool. I have an old laptop that I use on occasion for ECU tuning and a Surface Pro that's pretty much just used for watching videos when I don't want to be at my desk or holding a phone. The...

    Very cool.

    I have an old laptop that I use on occasion for ECU tuning and a Surface Pro that's pretty much just used for watching videos when I don't want to be at my desk or holding a phone. The laptop was a hand-me-down from my wife who picked up a new one, the Surface was tossed in as a tip for some independent work I did for a customer.

    I've never been a big fan of laptops due to the lack of upgradeability, lack of component replaceability, and rapid obsolescence (be it planned or otherwise); same reason I don't buy high end phones, because they're generally on their last legs/outdated in two years time and new touted features are typically not worth the higher price tag. This seems to solve that, if they can stay in business long enough.

    It would be nice to have a laptop that's faster, with better connectivity, for my purposes, but I'll wait for them to prove they have the ability to remain in business over a couple of years, for a second generation (so to speak) to emerge (1st gen of new tech is always buggy/faulty), and most importantly AMD CPUs.

    6 votes
    1. soks_n_sandals
      Link Parent
      I have to say that I have had really good user-serviceability on my Dell (and family/friend Dells I have done support for). I have a Precision 5510 laptop, which is basically the workstation...

      I have to say that I have had really good user-serviceability on my Dell (and family/friend Dells I have done support for).

      I have a Precision 5510 laptop, which is basically the workstation version of the XPS. I've had it since early 2017. While it's been running nicely, I plan to upgrade the RAM and hard drive (from HDD to SSD) soon to extend the life another 3-5 years.

      I'm going to do the same on my wife's Dell Inspiron (from late 2017), which has been a piece of shit for the past 2 years because its harddrive is garbage and it has 8 gigs of RAM. It was unusable with Win10. It's been running PopOS nicely though, minus a GNOME memory issue.

      But Dell's business-oriented machines can be reasonably easy to work on, especially compared to a Mac.

      5 votes
  3. [3]
    teaearlgraycold
    Link
    I would absolutely buy this if it had thunderbolt or good discrete graphics. Hopefully we get one or both of those on a second generation device.

    I would absolutely buy this if it had thunderbolt or good discrete graphics. Hopefully we get one or both of those on a second generation device.

    3 votes
    1. pallas
      (edited )
      Link Parent
      Apparently the ports are actually implemented as Thunderbolt 4, and will function in the same way, but are not certified yet, and so can't be officially called Thunderbolt 4 until they are. See...

      Apparently the ports are actually implemented as Thunderbolt 4, and will function in the same way, but are not certified yet, and so can't be officially called Thunderbolt 4 until they are. See this comment from them, for example. This thread references tb3 egpus working.

      The company have been pretty surprisingly open about details in their forums.

      4 votes
  4. MeckiSpaghetti
    (edited )
    Link
    Am I seeing this correctly that the air vents are at the bottom side of the device? Does anyone know if it’s used to suck in surrounding air or to blow the heat out? It seems like a questionable...

    Am I seeing this correctly that the air vents are at the bottom side of the device? Does anyone know if it’s used to suck in surrounding air or to blow the heat out?

    It seems like a questionable design choice to me, especially when having the notebook on a blanket or on a lap with clothes that might cover the vents.

    It reminds me of old Apple MacBook models which had the same problem …

    1 vote