BoredomAddict's recent activity

  1. Comment on Neoliberalism – the ideology at the root of all our problems in ~misc

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    But that isn't what neoliberalism is about anymore? The Republican party still claims that they're the party of Lincoln but we all know that the Southern Strategy changed that. Libertarianism fits...

    But that isn't what neoliberalism is about anymore? The Republican party still claims that they're the party of Lincoln but we all know that the Southern Strategy changed that. Libertarianism fits the description that you gave, and plain old "liberal" doesn't even seem to refer to pro-free-market views anymore. The way words are used dictates their meaning, not the other way around. I would describe neoliberalism as much closer to social democracy today.

  2. Comment on First Impressions of FromSoftware's Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice are now out in ~games

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    The biggest thing that got me is that falling is not an instant death anymore. Instead, you respawn on whatever surface you fell from with less HP. This will make it way less risky to move around...

    The biggest thing that got me is that falling is not an instant death anymore. Instead, you respawn on whatever surface you fell from with less HP. This will make it way less risky to move around the environment quickly, which seems to be where all of the level design is pointing to.

    2 votes
  3. Comment on The Correspondant - A different business model for organizations producing journalism. in ~misc

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    Wow, this alone makes it worth supporting them to me! I'm so happy to see people trying to tackle the issues with old-fashioned journalism that have been made obvious over the past few years.

    Then they got some feedback that they were a bit hypocritical because they were using google's analytics tools, so they switched to self-hosting (even though they knew it would bring overhead, extra costs)

    Wow, this alone makes it worth supporting them to me! I'm so happy to see people trying to tackle the issues with old-fashioned journalism that have been made obvious over the past few years.

    2 votes
  4. Comment on We need a loveable mascot in ~tildes

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    I really like the minimalism of a ~ sticker. I enjoy the aesthetics of the Human Rights Campaign stickers even though it's not immediately recognizable to people who aren't already familiar with HRC.

    I really like the minimalism of a ~ sticker. I enjoy the aesthetics of the Human Rights Campaign stickers even though it's not immediately recognizable to people who aren't already familiar with HRC.

    1 vote
  5. Comment on Neoliberalism – the ideology at the root of all our problems in ~misc

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    Here's the first article I read on neoliberalism, that I think describes the basics of the ideology well. Obviously, it's much more nuanced than one article will show, but I find it much closer to...

    Here's the first article I read on neoliberalism, that I think describes the basics of the ideology well. Obviously, it's much more nuanced than one article will show, but I find it much closer to social democracy than what the OP is suggesting neoliberalism is.

    3 votes
  6. Comment on Neoliberalism – the ideology at the root of all our problems in ~misc

    BoredomAddict Link
    I hate seeing "neoliberalism" thrown around as a boogeyman term like this instead of the neoconservatism that is actually harming people. Modern day neoliberalism looks very different from the...

    I hate seeing "neoliberalism" thrown around as a boogeyman term like this instead of the neoconservatism that is actually harming people. Modern day neoliberalism looks very different from the Reaganomics that this article seems to imply. Neoliberals are pro-market, yes, but not anti-regulation in any way. Here's a good place to start reading on what modern-day neoliberalism is.

    4 votes
  7. Comment on Anyone here play Warframe? in ~games

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    Honestly unlocking new warframes and weapons starts happening a lot faster than you would think after you get going, I pretty much never had a moment where I didn't have something new being...

    Honestly unlocking new warframes and weapons starts happening a lot faster than you would think after you get going, I pretty much never had a moment where I didn't have something new being crafted after the first few hours learning the ropes of the game. You definitely need to have the wiki open in a second window for a lot of the game though. I wish they could spend some time improving the game's onboarding process, but they'd lose a lot of veteran players if they spent that much time without introducing new content.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on Anyone here play Warframe? in ~games

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    Yeah, it's way too difficult to learn for a lot of people unless you have a group that's already pretty far along that can just steamroll early content for you. I agree that it's grindy, but the...

    Yeah, it's way too difficult to learn for a lot of people unless you have a group that's already pretty far along that can just steamroll early content for you. I agree that it's grindy, but the grinding is the fun part, for me at least, so I really don't mind it as long as I get to keep flying around cutting down enemies as a space ninja.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on Trigger warning tag / special flair? in ~tildes

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    I think @Deimos mentioned it already, that way someone can filter out all trigger tags easily, rather than having to filter out all of the individual tags.

    I think @Deimos mentioned it already, that way someone can filter out all trigger tags easily, rather than having to filter out all of the individual tags.

    7 votes
  10. Comment on After Charlottesville, solving the problem of angry men: What does healthy masculinity look like? in ~life

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    Right? Like, my shitty apartment is warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer than the castle of any king ever was. Yeah I have to work for it, but it's a hell of a lot better than the...

    Right? Like, my shitty apartment is warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer than the castle of any king ever was. Yeah I have to work for it, but it's a hell of a lot better than the alternative of having to hunt for my food or farm for my entire life.

    4 votes
  11. Comment on After Charlottesville, solving the problem of angry men: What does healthy masculinity look like? in ~life

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    Absolutely. I had similar problems in my grade school growing up, although I wasn't quite reading Stephen Hawking at 9. A strong support structure for people to learn at whatever pace they're...

    As long as "the proper tools" includes knowing when to give a kid the address of the public library, help them get a library card, and tell the staff that the kid is to have full access to the adult section.

    Absolutely. I had similar problems in my grade school growing up, although I wasn't quite reading Stephen Hawking at 9. A strong support structure for people to learn at whatever pace they're comfortable with is fundamental to a good education in my eyes. I was lucky enough to have a few family members who saw my love of reading everything around me and would consistently give me books far more complex and adult than anything in a school library.

    Training teachers to better handle kids that are already beyond what is covered in their courses is a must as well. If a student can demonstrate their knowledge of a subject and test out of it, why shouldn't they be allowed to take higher level courses? I think rather than keeping kids in the same class by their age for twelve straight years, we could let kids take classes the way many colleges do, where they can sign up for any course they have the prerequisite credits for. For example, a student in my grade was exceptionally good at math, to the point where he had completed our school's AP calculus course a year or two ahead of most. They allowed him to take higher level math classes at a local community college after the high school got out, and I think that's a great thing.

    2 votes
  12. Comment on After Charlottesville, solving the problem of angry men: What does healthy masculinity look like? in ~life

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    Good point. I think you're probably right, but we would need an enormous number of people to do this to help. It's way easier for trolls to just spit vitriol everywhere than it is to clean it up....

    What's the alternative? If we don't give them positive attention they will seek it elsewhere. Sure, it might be damage control, but I prefer damage control to inaction.

    Good point. I think you're probably right, but we would need an enormous number of people to do this to help. It's way easier for trolls to just spit vitriol everywhere than it is to clean it up.

    It's becoming enough of a problem that people are actually making it a priority to fix.

    I hope that the "Let's make our own Reddit" trend catches on, and I think that "we don't allow assholes here" is a great competitive edge for people looking for an online discussion space. I mean, it's what got me on Tildes!

    1 vote
  13. Comment on After Charlottesville, solving the problem of angry men: What does healthy masculinity look like? in ~life

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    Why was school an unpleasant experience for you? Also, are you in the US? I think if we can give our education system the proper tools to teach people, it would be more enjoyable and effective for...

    Why was school an unpleasant experience for you? Also, are you in the US? I think if we can give our education system the proper tools to teach people, it would be more enjoyable and effective for everyone involved. A lot of the stress I've experienced in school was centered around being able to afford my student loans, and if college was tuition-free I would have been far less worried about my financial situation after graduating. I've genuinely enjoyed most of my actual classwork after high school.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on After Charlottesville, solving the problem of angry men: What does healthy masculinity look like? in ~life

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    You're definitely right there. If it were clear and achievable for anybody to get an education without excessive debt or huge amounts of money, a huge socioeconomic burden would be lifted, at...

    I agree, but it seems like the connection needs to be explicitly said that it would benefit men, otherwise they're likely to assume those policies are for "others" and not for them.

    You're definitely right there. If it were clear and achievable for anybody to get an education without excessive debt or huge amounts of money, a huge socioeconomic burden would be lifted, at least in the US.

    1 vote
  15. Comment on After Charlottesville, solving the problem of angry men: What does healthy masculinity look like? in ~life

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    It's been way too long since I read that, I'll have to give it a reread. I just wonder if there are enough humans out there with strong enough skills in communication to do the job, or to teach...

    If you've ever read the book "how to win friends and influence people",

    It's been way too long since I read that, I'll have to give it a reread.

    We get defensive very quickly about our core values, and it's really tough to reach someone without very strong communication skills and good intent.

    I just wonder if there are enough humans out there with strong enough skills in communication to do the job, or to teach others to do so.

    I guess I'm just more optimistic than you are. I think they're desperately latching on to anyone that gives them attention, and if we gave them positive attention, they might listen to us too.

    I wish I could be more optimistic, but it's getting harder and harder for me. I agree that they're desperate for attention, but I don't know that positive attention will make much difference in many cases.

    There's always going to be hostile/negative actors, we just need to create a good plan to counter them.

    Agreed. Is there any sort of framework for online spaces to use, aside from outright banning trolls, to keep their communities less hostile? I'm hoping Tildes can do a good job of it but I haven't seen or heard of another place on the internet that is making that a priority.

    1 vote
  16. Comment on After Charlottesville, solving the problem of angry men: What does healthy masculinity look like? in ~life

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    The left's push for making higher education accessible to those with less money is the alternative narrative in my mind. That would certainly help with the difficulties dating educated women, as...

    I don't really see an alternative narrative proffered elsewhere.

    The left's push for making higher education accessible to those with less money is the alternative narrative in my mind. That would certainly help with the difficulties dating educated women, as well as the lack of physical labor jobs. This is an economic issue at it's core.

    2 votes
  17. Comment on After Charlottesville, solving the problem of angry men: What does healthy masculinity look like? in ~life

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    That sounds like a fantastic environment for learning about these issues. I would have loved having access group like that growing up and feeling confused about masculinity as a whole.

    That sounds like a fantastic environment for learning about these issues. I would have loved having access group like that growing up and feeling confused about masculinity as a whole.

    1 vote
  18. Comment on After Charlottesville, solving the problem of angry men: What does healthy masculinity look like? in ~life

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    I've been thinking about the same thing, and I hope that's the case. I want for this to be the death rattle of a dying ideology, and that in the future we see men like Terry Crews as the cultural...

    I've been thinking about the same thing, and I hope that's the case. I want for this to be the death rattle of a dying ideology, and that in the future we see men like Terry Crews as the cultural touchstone for masculinity rather than James Bond.

    3 votes
  19. Comment on After Charlottesville, solving the problem of angry men: What does healthy masculinity look like? in ~life

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    I wasn't using the word "arguing" in the sense that you are, I should have said conversing there. I do understand how someone's circumstances could lead to these beliefs, reading books like...

    I'm not asking you to argue anything. In fact, I'm encouraging you to not say a word at first. I'm asking you to listen to them. Understand why they hold the ideas they hold. Question them about it, so that they might question themselves.

    I wasn't using the word "arguing" in the sense that you are, I should have said conversing there. I do understand how someone's circumstances could lead to these beliefs, reading books like Hillbilly Elegy have helped me with that, but I think that just about anyone who would change their mind on these things probably already has.

    I agree that it's very difficult to change people's minds on these things, I've only succeeded in a couple of cases with close family and friends. The problem is that there are people out there with a vested interest in keeping these kinds of ideologies going, and their core values are so wildly different from ours that even getting them to question their views will only strengthen them because they want to put others down.

    There are a lot of people out there, and you shouldn't let a few sour apples spoil the barrel.

    That's easy to say, but it seems we already have a barrelful of spoiled apples on our hands. I'm certain there are some people out there who still might change their ways, just by the sheer number of humans in this country, but they are a shrinking percentage compared to the trolls making up more and more of the right wing.

    Unfortunately yes, but that's where technology might perhaps help us out. I really don't know what a solution would look like for this problem, but it involves a lot more interpersonal relationships, even if they are mediated through technology.

    I'm hopeful that tech like VR/AR could have applications in improving interpersonal relationships, I just hope that the right wing doesn't weaponize it the way they have sites like Twitter and Reddit.

    1 vote
  20. Comment on After Charlottesville, solving the problem of angry men: What does healthy masculinity look like? in ~life

    BoredomAddict Link Parent
    I've made that mistake in the past debating religion when I first became an atheist in high school. I realize the futility of beginning a conversation that way, but that only applies when both...

    How much of it is because people start conversations with them online by saying "you are wrong, and a terrible person".

    I've made that mistake in the past debating religion when I first became an atheist in high school. I realize the futility of beginning a conversation that way, but that only applies when both parties would otherwise be arguing in good faith; I no longer believe that most of these people are interested in a discussion of that sort, regardless of how you start the conversation.

    And how experienced are you with their society? Are you really enough of an expert to claim anything about them in such broad terms?

    Growing up in the midwest, I feel like I can say I'm pretty familiar with them. I've known a number of people who have confederate flags in front of their houses and on their trucks, and I've had this conversation in person a number of times. The past few years have shown me that a far larger number of people are choosing to behave this way, and that I was wrong to have applied Hanlon's razor so liberally.

    It makes me think of the pilot programs in Chicago and other major cities aimed at youth (often colored) and educating them that violence is not the right way. It has reduced violence in some of these cities by as much as 90%.

    That number is uplifting for sure, but we run into the same problem with rural areas. It becomes much harder to implement these programs effectively when the population density gets low.

    4 votes