Macil's recent activity

  1. Comment on How Facebook is bringing QUIC to billions in ~tech

    Macil
    Link Parent
    How is that true? Their benefits of security, speed, and reliability apply for any kind of site transferring much data.

    How is that true? Their benefits of security, speed, and reliability apply for any kind of site transferring much data.

    1 vote
  2. Comment on Graham Linehan says he won’t work with Channel 4 again unless transphobic IT Crowd episode is reinstated in ~tv

    Macil
    Link Parent
    If Zapp Brannigan was a main character of Futurama, and the only women that showed up on the show were belittled and were never fleshed out as characters and only lost out in those situations...

    People don't call Linehan sexist because he created a sexist character; nor is David X Cohen sexist for creating Zapp Brannigan. Calling this episode transphobic is a pretty weird take IMO.

    If Zapp Brannigan was a main character of Futurama, and the only women that showed up on the show were belittled and were never fleshed out as characters and only lost out in those situations (being pushed out of the show included), then it would be a lot touchier and a lot likelier to age terribly.

    Back when I first watched the episode, I didn't have an understanding of what trans people were, and I felt a bit sympathetic like I learned about someone's struggle ... though really that feeling was counterbalanced a lot with the feeling of "Douglas met another weird character and their combined weirdness equaled comedy". In today's context, with the understanding that many people are knowledgeable of trans people and yet don't respect their struggles, including the very creator of that episode, it makes me really doubtful that the sympathetic part of the reaction is what most people get out of the episode or was intended.

    4 votes
  3. Comment on What the internet could be in ~tech

    Macil
    Link Parent
    There's two parts to AMP that provide benefits: it imposes some restrictions in javascript and page resources you can use, and it allows the page to be preloaded into a user's browser before they...

    There's two parts to AMP that provide benefits: it imposes some restrictions in javascript and page resources you can use, and it allows the page to be preloaded into a user's browser before they click a link to it. The first part, the imposed performance and resource size restrictions, can be self-imposed without AMP. The second part is useful for some cases (for getting the very first load time lower) but it's about removing the time spent on downloading resources, not about lowering the CPU time needed to render the resources.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on Do you separate the art from the artist? in ~talk

    Macil
    Link
    One angle I don't see discussed much: one reason people like being fans of things is to share the thing with others and to have opportunities to meet other fans. If an active media creator is...

    One angle I don't see discussed much: one reason people like being fans of things is to share the thing with others and to have opportunities to meet other fans. If an active media creator is found to be an avid white supremacist, then it's likely they're going to lose a lot of non-bigoted fans who no longer want to support them, and then gain a lot of bigoted fans. Now it's more likely that if you meet other fans that they're going to be bigoted, and it's more likely that anyone you share your interest with is going to worry that you're a bigot.

    I don't think this effect applies to all shitty creators. It's really dependent on what they did, whether they're still active or a public figure, and whether they still profit from their creations. If an active media creator comes out as a white supremacist, then their fanbase is probably going to shift to be more bigoted. But if a no-longer-active media creator is later revealed to be a pedophile or abused their spouse, in my experience it doesn't seem like they usually gain a similarly problematic fandom from that, so their work isn't as tainted.

    3 votes
  5. Comment on Notch deletes his Twitter account in deal with Game Maker's Toolkit in ~games

    Macil
    (edited )
    Link
    It's funny, just a few days ago I stumbled again onto this old Twitter exchange with one of the Yogscast founders and Notch. In GMTK's context tweet, it looks like they said that their videos were...

    It's funny, just a few days ago I stumbled again onto this old Twitter exchange with one of the Yogscast founders and Notch.

    In GMTK's context tweet, it looks like they said that their videos were going to have arbitrary ads on them, including possibly Trump re-election ads, and then they said something they censored in the screenshot, which I assume was a message to say they disagreed with Trump ads such as a pro-Biden or pro-BLM message. I wonder which part made Notch object. It would be a pleasant turnaround if it was the Trump ad part, but somehow I doubt it.

    7 votes
  6. Comment on What was the first game you ever loved? in ~games

    Macil
    Link Parent
    I've loved playing it online with the Zandronum (formerly known as Skulltag) port. I like dropping into either classic co-op servers, or joining servers with over-the-top co-op "invasion" maps...

    I've loved playing it online with the Zandronum (formerly known as Skulltag) port. I like dropping into either classic co-op servers, or joining servers with over-the-top co-op "invasion" maps where you fight waves of enemies and the level expands. It's been years since I've tried it, so hopefully it's still active. Maybe I'll try it again sometime.

  7. Comment on Announcing TypeScript 4.0 in ~comp

    Macil
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Right. If you ignore the typechecking part, nearly all of what Typescript compilation does to produce the output is just strip out all the type annotations from the code. function foo(x: number):...

    Right. If you ignore the typechecking part, nearly all of what Typescript compilation does to produce the output is just strip out all the type annotations from the code. function foo(x: number): string { ... } becomes function foo(x) { ... }, etc. Typescript doesn't provide any heavy lifting to support features at runtime that don't exist in regular Javascript (except maybe in a few cases for backwards compatibility with older JS versions).

  8. Comment on Announcing TypeScript 4.0 in ~comp

    Macil
    Link Parent
    I think it's easy to misread what you said, so just to be clear: The partial editing mode wasn't added because VS Code got bigger and slower, it got added because VS Code's Typescript-related IDE...

    I think it's easy to misread what you said, so just to be clear: The partial editing mode wasn't added because VS Code got bigger and slower, it got added because VS Code's Typescript-related IDE features were always slow to become usable on large projects that were opened inside of VS Code.

    1 vote
  9. Comment on What do you use your extra mouse buttons for? in ~talk

    Macil
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    Link
    Is there a way to map a button on my mouse to a unique new "key", that won't be interpreted by any program as an existing key? I have a logitech mouse with 7 buttons on it (normal 2, middle click,...

    Is there a way to map a button on my mouse to a unique new "key", that won't be interpreted by any program as an existing key? I have a logitech mouse with 7 buttons on it (normal 2, middle click, then four side buttons), but the logitech software only allows the buttons to be mapped to mouse 1-5 or standard pre-existing keyboard keys. That almost works okay for the first five keys, but I want to do things like make it so the extra buttons toggle mute/push-to-talk/deafen in Discord, and nothing else. I don't want it to trigger forward/back if I happen to press it while open in a browser or windows explorer. I don't want to bind the button to a numpad key because I don't want it doing whatever that key does in whatever program I happen to be using. I don't want it to do some standard key combo because I want to be able to hit it while I'm actively pressing other regular keyboard buttons in a game and I don't want it triggering those. I don't want to reconfigure every program I use to ignore mouse 4 and up, because I use a lot of programs while in voice calls and not all of them are that configurable.

    I found a total hack to make that work for the mouse 4 and 5 buttons specifically: I set the logitech software to make the 4th and 5th buttons do forward and back (which seem to be the standard mouse 4 and 5 binds), and then use X-Mouse to intercept mouse 4 and 5 and reinterpret them as the "F13" and "F14" keys, which absolutely no software reacts to by default because most keyboards don't have them. Then I can set Discord to react to those keys.

    But I can't do that with the 6th and 7th buttons on my mouse because the logitech software doesn't let me set them to be "mouse 6" and "mouse 7" binds, and it doesn't let me directly bind them to F15/F16 because it doesn't happen to have those in its key list. I have to have the keys bound to mouse keys in the logitech software before they can be read by X-Mouse, and the logitech software only offers mouse 1-5 binds. I guess I could try to figure out a normal F-number key or a weird key like the sysrq key that would be safeish in most programs to copy, and just have the logitech software bind a button directly to that, but I'm really baffled that I can't figure out the clean solution to this. Maybe there's an alternative to the logitech software that would just let me pick a higher-numbered F-number key directly.

    Surely I'm not the only one with this kind of issue? It seems like making each button on the mouse do something separate than any other existing buttons is exactly what anyone would want to do with a device like this, but it weirdly doesn't seem to be part of the happy path of any of the software. Is this actually an unrealistic goal? What do people who buy extra keyboard inputs (like this "streamer deck") do to make those buttons do unique things that don't conflict with other keys? (People wouldn't buy these extra inputs if it's just colliding with keys they already have, right?)

  10. Comment on Xbox Series X launching in November, Halo Infinite delayed to 2021 in ~games

    Macil
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    I'm disappointed because I've been looking forward to a new Halo, but I'm still planning on upgrading to the new xbox promptly. Some games don't manage to stay at 60fps (especially on 4k) on the...

    I'm disappointed because I've been looking forward to a new Halo, but I'm still planning on upgrading to the new xbox promptly. Some games don't manage to stay at 60fps (especially on 4k) on the xbox one x and I just really can't stand that any more. I've seen how amazing 120+fps games look like on a good computer, and anything under 60fps is utterly dead to me now. (Apparently the new xbox can even do 120fps, though I don't have the tv for that yet.) I'm really liking Microsoft's current model of committing to supporting the entire existing xbox one games library.

    1 vote
  11. Comment on What dark matter is (probably) not in ~space

    Macil
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    The idea that gravity just works differently than we thought and explains dark matter is called a MOND theory (modified Newtonian dynamics) and it's mentioned in the article that those theories...

    The idea that gravity just works differently than we thought and explains dark matter is called a MOND theory (modified Newtonian dynamics) and it's mentioned in the article that those theories can't explain dark matter. No one figured out a way it could exactly explain things like the galactic rotation speeds, but the really big issue is that can't explain the Bullet Cluster, where the regular matter and dark matter have visibly separated. It's really hard to imagine how a theory that there's no dark matter, just weird gravity around regular matter, could explain that situation.

    This list about the evidence for dark matter is really good and concise: https://www.reddit.com/r/space/comments/6488wb/comment/dg05wx4.

    Everything we've seen is consistent with the idea that most matter in the universe is made of weakly-interacting particles probably like neutrinos. We know that there exist weakly interacting particles, and we don't have reason to think we know all particle types, so this theory is pretty mundane. (I've seen dark matter skepticism around online, and I wonder if the skepticism is fueled in part by thinking dark matter is stranger than it is.) Every time we've come up with a new test, it's matched up with what we'd expect if this were true. Theorizing otherwise is like living with roommates, finding your food disappearing from the fridge, and theorizing that food just has a tendency to disappear rather than it being that your roommates are eating the food, and then trying to come up with a separate explanation for the appearance of dirty dishes.

    2 votes
  12. Comment on Giving GPT-3 a Turing Test in ~tech

    Macil
    Link Parent
    AI Dungeon is currently based on GPT2 instead of GPT3, which is amazing compared to anything before it, but it's missing a lot of GPT3's capabilities. They're working on upgrading it to GPT3.

    AI Dungeon is currently based on GPT2 instead of GPT3, which is amazing compared to anything before it, but it's missing a lot of GPT3's capabilities. They're working on upgrading it to GPT3.

    4 votes
  13. Comment on Is anyone here involved with Stack Exchange/Stack Overflow? How do you feel about the new moderator agreement? in ~talk

    Macil
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    Link
    I've found it hard to sympathize with the drama around the Monica firing since it had to do with her trying to play word games to avoid following the spirit of a rule about respecting trans...

    I've found it hard to sympathize with the drama around the Monica firing since it had to do with her trying to play word games to avoid following the spirit of a rule about respecting trans people's pronouns. I don't think it's too much for a site to select for moderators that will enthusiastically enforce and support their rules, and from the way you describe the new mod agreement, it sounds like they're looking for moderators that agree with that.

    I feel like there's some aspect I'm missing (is there a lack of precedent of SE introducing rules or actually enforcing them?), but even then, I still question people that choose to die on a hill against a rule about referring to a marginalized group how they want to be referred to.

    6 votes
  14. Comment on Fortnite: It's not coming back - The game of the generation in ~games

    Macil
    Link
    I started reading, and I'm loving this article. It captures so much of what I love from the kind of multiplayer game that Fortnite is. I feel like I usually only see this kind of writing about...

    I started reading, and I'm loving this article. It captures so much of what I love from the kind of multiplayer game that Fortnite is. I feel like I usually only see this kind of writing about cinematic or quirky single-player games. Multiplayer games, especially anything containing in-app purchases, seem to always be written off as immature or fake experiences for children or mindless consumers that aren't worth examining. I previously watched the Folding Ideas video on Fortnite, and while it had neat parts, I had some quiet annoyance at its refusal to engage with the game. I realize I shared the author's criticisms of the video:

    Amidst these very real problems, a slew of less real ones infected talk of Fortnite. Typical among them was Folding Ideas’ video about Fortnite’s ‘manufactured discontent’. It begins with bad jokes and Tencent Chinese scaremongering and ends by calling Fortnite “a weaponized product targeted at kids”. Of course the children. Always the children.

    Dan Olson’s main claim is that Fortnite isn’t really a game; it’s a storefront. Which initially sounds smart, in that facile, thinkpiecey sort of way. And which just so happens to suit his form of distanced analysis that doesn’t require deep engagement with the actual game everyone is playing. It’s not even clear that he played the main battle royale game much during his month-long tour, given his arguments. Or given that all his video footage is taken from Team Rumble, a side game mode which is just a large scale deathmatch, not a battle royale.

    Like I find it interesting to see a video talking about the store aspects of the game, but personally I never really engaged with that aspect of the game, and it's tiring to see that as the aspect almost exclusively discussed of any game containing a storefront.


    Each of these scenes I come upon vibrates with occurrence, with incident. They feel different than the environmental storytelling of so many other videogames, the kind that Fortnite also excels at. No, here you follow the tracks of other players on the fly, without the aid of videogame vapor trails. You read the signs and try to imagine what must have gone down not days or years but minutes before. Yet in the end it usually proves too messy to fully reconstruct. It’s less carefully arranged dioramas and hamfisted graffiti and more crime scenes that cannot be solved. You look around and think: something definitely happened here. But you can’t be sure exactly what.

    For a while I found all the makeshift structures, the titular forts of Fortnite, ugly. They looked like mistakes out there on the field, plain goofs. Each prefab annex marred the rolling hills I wished to lose myself in. I held to my old taste for landscape, for its private meadows and illusion of permanence. My years in the open world trenches had taught me: even virtual landscapes can make you feel a little immortal.

    But over time, these awkward towers became more beautiful to me. They were not built to be beautiful, or even functional, really. They were built desperately. Without meticulous planning, in some space before conscious design, almost natural in their way. These elaborate vertical shanties that popped up all over Fortnite island were fossils of desperation, rickety monuments to our brief gaming lives. This was what happened when present needs dominated, when there was no real future to consider. This was the architecture of survival.

    I feel this a lot while playing Rust lately. Rust has some vague similarities to Fortnite in that there's building and constant danger from other players, though it has the difference that the world generally lasts for a week instead of a single ~30 minute match. People build bases to live in rather than build temporary structures for battles, so there's a lot more purpose and interaction to the structures. There's something really neat to encountering the structures and trying to guess whether they're still actively used or abandoned, whether they pose a threat or may provide cover, what intent the creator had, whether they can be broken into and stolen from or repurposed, and wondering what battles and stories once defined the structure.

    On multiple occasions in Rust, I've found a partially decayed base, rebuilt it to use as my own base, placing my own lockable doors on all the empty door frames, but found a pre-existing locked door from the previous owner that I was never able to open. There's something weird about inhabiting a player-made structure, half-made by you and filled with all of your stuff, defending it from others as your property, and yet still having a locked door in your home that you don't know what it leads to. It's like the common dream of finding a room in your house that you didn't know about.

    Still, I think of all the game worlds I’ve inhabited over the years and wonder why Fortnite feels so different. How does its world achieve such a powerful thereness? Why do I feel so attached to its landscapes? [...] Fortnite’s main battle royale competitors, Apex Legends and PUBG, do not have living worlds. [...]

    PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds at least has size and emptiness and awkward mechanics on its side for world feeling. But its world is dead. Whatever happened here, it happened in the unplayed past. It is, like so many videogames, fundamentally post. Not just post-apocalyptic or post-war but post-world. There is little evidence of life, of movement, of anyone passing. Time itself has been frozen, lost. The battle royale is the only present left.

    I've thought about this sort of thing a lot. In most games, the game map is something fixed, that was created through processes entirely separate from the gameplay sandbox sometime before the player ever arrives, and then is immutable. Literally, the game world is usually made long before you got the game by devs in a map editor, a thing that doesn't exist in gameplay to players. Canonically, the game world is created by people making buildings or even breaking things, sometime before the player arrived, and the player can never view that process in the act or contribute to it.

    Minecraft is interesting because it mostly removes that division. Almost any structure you find already placed in the world can be unmade, remade, or added on by you. There's no sense that the world mysteriously became immutable immediately prior to your arrival.

    Fortnite also avoids this feeling of the world suddenly becoming immutable prior to your arrival, not by letting you completely freely edit it with persistence like Minecraft, but by having constant updates changing the world. This technique seems uncommon outside of maybe some active MMOs.

    But I cannot return to Wailing Woods. It doesn’t matter what I do. The loss is permanent. Fortnite is remarkable not only in how giddily it adds to the island, but in how ruthlessly it subtracts. The game takes a radical attitude towards continuity and loss. One that embraces not the usual videogame smorgasbord, not player choice, not availability, but rather: finitude. These limits create a striking sense of lived history. Not only that what happened happened, but that some things are no longer happening. Some things are just plain gone.

    It wears on you. The more you play, the more you feel attached to some corner of the world, the more you have to lose when the end finally comes. If in Minecraft you domesticate space, block by block, then in Fortnite, loss by loss, time domesticates you. And part of me wants to be domesticated. I relish the loss of Wailing Woods. It’s so rare for a game to mark me this way, wound me, make me actually ache. I get so tired of exerting my vain will on a virtual world. I want to feel it work its will on me.

    This reminds me of playing Minecraft in hardcore difficulty, where dying once wipes your save file, or playing Rust and losing a base to an end-of-the-week level wipe or to raiders who steal it. It's an interesting feeling. It's stressful in the moment of course, but having that finality as a risk adds so much to the experience while playing. It's strange how rare the feeling still is in games.


    I've finished reading it now. I've really only touched on the first half of the essay. It starts talking about the structure of games overall, games criticism's failure to look beyond that, politics, philosophy of life... I thought I was just getting into an article delving into the fun of online games. A little melodramatic at parts (is Fortnite really all that different now that the island doesn't change in the same way?), but it's deeply invigorating. I see myself returning to this article often in the future, especially as I try to brainstorm about what games can be.

    A section I liked about "clockwork" vs "contingency"

    We forget, in part, because of how profoundly limited contingency is in actual games. Chance is not deeply felt. Consequences barely cascade. [...] Our brief gaming lives simply do not play out in multiple ways that matter. We win or we lose. We get one or two or three endings. We arrive at single prescribed conclusions ‘our way’, which generally amounts to what flair we pinned to our avatar. The vast ‘possibility space’ of videogames turns out to be a sham. It’s a space the size of a pencil box. So little is possible in the end. So little actually depends. [...]

    Except that Outer Wilds is also a clockwork world. Which is to say: it plays out the same way every time. Its solar system is an elaborate limited-solution puzzle box, and the only thing that changes is your understanding of how it works. It is in this way both solipsistic and hopeless. Not only can you affect nothing, nothing else can affect anything either. Its world is thus not simply dying — it’s already dead.

    You play in the already-over world of Outer Wilds and a coldness creeps in. No amount of campfires or wistful songs can warm a space so emotionally inert. The game speaks to an engineering mindset resigned to deterministic inevitability and tries to provide a kind of comfort in the flat melancholy of its mechanism. [...] It’s all just-for-you, this single-minded puzzle world. The only time it really comes alive is when your rickety ship overshoots or crashlands or is carried away by the tides. When something unexpected happens. When intention is accidentally refused its expected end.

    A clockwork world is the exact opposite of a contingent world. It is the rejection of possibility, the submission to certainty. And yet it’s completely common in games. Outer Wilds is just one of the purest, most deliberately crafted examples of a mentality that runs through so much of gaming. Videogames are filled with clockwork comforts, whether you play as a cog, a god, a kink, or a hero of time. Some can still be wonderful, but the limits are clear. There are only fixed roles to play and systemic destinies to fulfill.

    6 votes
  15. Comment on Does the ISS have any procedures in place for alien contact? in ~space

    Macil
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    Besides that it would be basically too improbable to worry about, I don't think there's much we could do that would really matter. Any civilization that meets us is going to be much more advanced...

    Besides that it would be basically too improbable to worry about, I don't think there's much we could do that would really matter. Any civilization that meets us is going to be much more advanced than us. For one thing, they must have developed interstellar space travel, but also, there's little reason to expect that their civilization is anywhere near as young as ours. We're a couple hundred years since the industrial revolution. It would be the world's biggest coincidence if they were also within hundreds or even thousands of years of the equivalent point in their history; they could be millions of years past that point! If they spent even a fraction of that improving and remaking themselves, then the difference between us could be like the difference between us and monkeys or ants. Whatever they want from the world might be utterly alien to us too; maybe if we're crazy lucky, they'd find us cute and harmless enough to let us keep going in a way we'd want to.

    I really like the short story Three Worlds Collide and the book Blindsight for their examples of how different alien life could be and how disruptive meeting it could be.

    3 votes
  16. Comment on Reddit releases their new content policy along with banning hundreds of subreddits, including /r/The_Donald and /r/ChapoTrapHouse in ~tech

    Macil
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    Link Parent
    I think it should be allowed for underrepresented groups to make limited spaces online explicitly for themselves depending on the circumstances. Excluding others is an extreme move, but it can be...

    I think it should be allowed for underrepresented groups to make limited spaces online explicitly for themselves depending on the circumstances. Excluding others is an extreme move, but it can be hard for underrepresented groups to find spaces of themselves to discuss their issues or culture, and it's important for groups to be able to have that. It can be hard for minority groups online to find spaces to discuss their perspectives on predominantly-white sites like Reddit without being absolutely overrun by well-meaning numbers of majority groups or even actively pushed back or subverted by hateful people. Majority groups like straight white men largely do not have that issue online, so the extreme move of exclusion would serve more as a statement about excluding for exclusion's sake rather than that benefit.

    Personally, I'm of the opinion that it's either okay for everyone, or it's not okay to do.

    I'm not operating from some absolute principle of "either exclusion is absolutely right or wrong in all circumstances" here, and I think it's harmful to do so. Whenever there's large negatives to exclusion, like especially if political power, influence, or networking opportunities were overwhelmingly concentrated in the exclusive space, then I don't think the space should be allowed to be exclusive.

    6 votes
  17. Comment on Reddit releases their new content policy along with banning hundreds of subreddits, including /r/The_Donald and /r/ChapoTrapHouse in ~tech

    Macil
    Link Parent
    It seems like they're reacting to the problems and criticism they faced specifically. It's not obvious to me that those are the same exact problems the US had when it listed out protected groups....

    Reddit clearly hasn't considered countries where people can be vulnerable and persecuted because of other beliefs, even if that belief is simply the belief in science-based medicine. [...] If the admins had just listed out US protected groups, they'd have veteran status in the mix.

    It seems like they're reacting to the problems and criticism they faced specifically. It's not obvious to me that those are the same exact problems the US had when it listed out protected groups. I haven't seen or heard the case of anti-veteran biases being a large problem on Reddit, so the lack of a rule about them isn't surprising.

    3 votes
  18. Comment on Reddit releases their new content policy along with banning hundreds of subreddits, including /r/The_Donald and /r/ChapoTrapHouse in ~tech

    Macil
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    Link Parent
    I imagine this is about weird ironic anti-white quips. Only a false equivalence exists between anti-black slurs and whatever passes as an anti-white slur. Stuff like anti-white comments largely...

    "the rule does not protect groups of people who are in the majority". So you can be as abusive as you like to people in a majority. Great!

    I imagine this is about weird ironic anti-white quips. Only a false equivalence exists between anti-black slurs and whatever passes as an anti-white slur. Stuff like anti-white comments largely doesn't reflect a systematic oppression of white people, so as a white person, I don't feel particularly offended at that sort of thing. I imagine attacks against your background impact a lot more when they correlate to bigoted positions held by society that have kept people of that specific background down for generations.

    This rule doesn't counteract other general rules about harassment that apply more universally.

    11 votes
  19. Comment on Create No-JavaScript friendly sites in ~comp

    Macil
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    I think it's useful to really emphasize that "no-javascript friendly sites" doesn't need to mean "no javascript". It just means your site needs to have its baseline functionality work without...

    I think it's useful to really emphasize that "no-javascript friendly sites" doesn't need to mean "no javascript". It just means your site needs to have its baseline functionality work without javascript running in the user's browser; it's fine to use javascript to provide extra functionality, or to make the functionality present in the HTML/CSS better. This is the principle of progressive enhancement.

    The principle of progressive enhancement isn't just about supporting the few users with javascript disabled. The principle means your site will also work before the javascript is loaded, and will continue to work if anything goes wrong with the javascript. Your site will become readable faster to users on slow or spotty connections, and if there are any problems with your javascript (like you accidentally relied on a very new feature that's not commonly supported in browsers, you didn't use a polyfill, and you only tested in one browser, and then a user visits with an incompatible browser), then things still mostly work.

    If you make a site built using React, you should do server-side rendering so that the each page's HTML contains the initial render of the page. The easiest way to do this is to use Next.js or Gatsby. You make your pages out of normal React components. The gotcha is that your React components won't ever have their useEffect/componentDidMount callbacks or any of their event handlers fire for users who don't load the page javascript. As long as your React components put out useful HTML in their initial render, as is good practice anyway, you should be fine.

    5 votes
  20. Comment on Microsoft to permanently close all of its retail stores, with locations in NYC, London, Sydney, and Redmond being converted to "experience centers" in ~tech

    Macil
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    Man I really liked swinging by the Microsoft store at the mall in SF, which is one of the ones closing. I brought my old xbox one there for repair once which was pretty convenient, and got my xbox...

    Man I really liked swinging by the Microsoft store at the mall in SF, which is one of the ones closing. I brought my old xbox one there for repair once which was pretty convenient, and got my xbox one x there. Admittedly I mostly just viewed the stuff there on my visits. Something about seeing all the different kinds of laptop and tablet demo units and everything else is fun.

    Not that I've been to the mall in months. Remember going to places? I guess I'll just watch a vaporwave mix video with mall footage again.

    3 votes