NoblePath's recent activity

  1. Comment on Any good auto or renters insurance companies? in ~finance

    NoblePath
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    Insurance is always a gamble, you never know how good or bad they are until you need it. That said, farm bureau took very good care of me in an at fault accident.

    Insurance is always a gamble, you never know how good or bad they are until you need it.

    That said, farm bureau took very good care of me in an at fault accident.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Did you know the LDS (aka Mormons) used to have Socialists among their leaders? in ~humanities

    NoblePath
    Link
    This above link is but one of a few where the editor of this magazine, "The Contributor" espoused the virtues of socialism without directly naming them. Here is an excerpt from the above link:...

    This above link is but one of a few where the editor of this magazine, "The Contributor" espoused the virtues of socialism without directly naming them.

    Here is an excerpt from the above link:

    [Capitalists cause in some places] the entire transference of the ownership of land from the peasant farmer to a wealthier class. [In other places, the peasant farmer’s] land is still his own, though he gains nothing by it, because he is impoverished by the capitalist traders, upon whom he depends for every single article which he needs…

    Here is another article about wealth and morals: https://archive.org/details/contributor1111eng/page/422/mode/2up?q=wealth

    In yet another article, which I read in an actual bound copy and cannot find at the moment, the Editor, one Junius Wells, talks about how much more spiritual and life affirming agriculture is to laboring men than mining and finance because of how humble and stable the former, and how speculative the latter. He then goes on to lament, much like Gandhi in reference to the British, that financiers removed Utah's material wealth and sold it back in manufactured goods at an unfair profit. He also implied that the laborers should be the ones owning the factories, not the capitalists.

    When I think of the ideal LDS of today I think of Mitt Romney, not a bad guy, not a bad leader, but definitely a neoliberal capitalist. But the truth is more complex.

    Charles Dickens once said of Mormons something like, "What they do is admirable, what they say is nonsense."

    If you're wondering why the sudden post on the LDS, I visited the conference center in SLC this weekend. AMA.

    5 votes
  3. Comment on The Ten Commandments must be displayed in all public Louisiana classrooms under requirement signed into law in ~humanities

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    Well, current psychological approaches, and me, would tend to differ. Cbt and dbt both rely on thinking about things and changing your reactions accordingly. Also, I was raised ina fundamentalist...

    Beliefs which have been reached without reason cannot be changed by reason.

    Well, current psychological approaches, and me, would tend to differ. Cbt and dbt both rely on thinking about things and changing your reactions accordingly. Also, I was raised ina fundamentalist setting, and a combination of experience and ideas led me out of it.

    9 votes
  4. Comment on Recommendations for less mass-produced and more artistic tv in ~tv

    NoblePath
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    How far put do you want to go? Herzog, Jodorowsky, Bergman, Lynch are all very creative, imaginative, and largely unbound. Red Dwarf for scifi comedy. The Prisoner for some 60s spy gnosticism....

    How far put do you want to go? Herzog, Jodorowsky, Bergman, Lynch are all very creative, imaginative, and largely unbound.

    Red Dwarf for scifi comedy.

    The Prisoner for some 60s spy gnosticism.

    Videodrome for weird horror.

    Max headroom for proto-cyberpunk.

    God on Trial for something somehow both exceedingly bleak and optimistic at the same time.

    Neil Breen for narcissistic weirdness.

    The Electric Company for experimental kids educational goodness.

    King of the Castle for an exploration of the transition from
    Childhood to adolescence.

    Look around you for offbeat comedy.

    Angie Tribeca for a contemporary take on zaz humor.

    Carl Sagan’s cosmos for science documentary.

    Hee Haw from the 70s.

  5. Comment on What have you done to conquer your fear? in ~health.mental

    NoblePath
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    Sounds like you’re doing some ifs work! I work on this stuff both in therapy but also in a fellowship called adult children of alcoholic and dysfunctional families. If your trauma stems from a...

    Sounds like you’re doing some ifs work!

    I work on this stuff both in therapy but also in a fellowship called adult children of alcoholic and dysfunctional families. If your trauma stems from a such a family (usually cptsd does I’m told) you might explore what it has to offer.

    I get: daily exposure to ideas and positive energy, a large community of people who really get it, a safe place to grieve, and a framework for daily living with all the characteristics that make cptsd an insidious condition.

    Good luck to us both.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on DeGoogling 2024: Replacing Photos, Gmail, and Search in ~tech

    NoblePath
    Link
    Why did you rule out protonmail?

    Why did you rule out protonmail?

    7 votes
  7. Comment on ‘Furiosa’ fires up Cannes with six-minute standing ovation for Anya Taylor-Joy and teary Chris Hemsworth in ~movies

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    That’s so interesting. I wonder if this is a generational thing? Although i got no nostalgia tingles and i thought the scene with mad max felt shoehorned and was glad it was so brief. I liked fury...

    That’s so interesting. I wonder if this is a generational thing? Although i got no nostalgia tingles and i thought the scene with mad max felt shoehorned and was glad it was so brief. I liked fury road a lot (it was the first film i watched on my 4k tv). But vastly preferred furiosa. Loved all the first three.

  8. Comment on ‘Furiosa’ fires up Cannes with six-minute standing ovation for Anya Taylor-Joy and teary Chris Hemsworth in ~movies

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    For sure agreed on Sicario, what a great film. That final line still haunts me: "You should move to a small town, somewhere the rule of law still applies. This has become a land of wolves, and you...

    For sure agreed on Sicario, what a great film. That final line still haunts me: "You should move to a small town, somewhere the rule of law still applies. This has become a land of wolves, and you are not a wolf."

  9. Comment on ‘Furiosa’ fires up Cannes with six-minute standing ovation for Anya Taylor-Joy and teary Chris Hemsworth in ~movies

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    You said that none of you liked Furiosa. I’m just curious, why you went to see it, whether you generally like scifi, apocalyptic, or action films, and if so, which movies from those genres you do...

    You said that none of you liked Furiosa. I’m just curious, why you went to see it, whether you generally like scifi, apocalyptic, or action films, and if so, which movies from those genres you do like. No judgment-and nor argument. I’m just curious.

    3 votes
  10. Comment on ‘Furiosa’ fires up Cannes with six-minute standing ovation for Anya Taylor-Joy and teary Chris Hemsworth in ~movies

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    Bombing = not making any money. I’m curious that if you like action, scifi, or post apocalyptic movies, which you would say stand out?

    Bombing = not making any money. I’m curious that if you like action, scifi, or post apocalyptic movies, which you would say stand out?

    4 votes
  11. Comment on ‘Furiosa’ fires up Cannes with six-minute standing ovation for Anya Taylor-Joy and teary Chris Hemsworth in ~movies

    NoblePath
    Link
    Just saw it last night in the imax. Incredible. Best movie experience I’ve had in a long time, and the popcorn was stale. I can’t understand why this movie is bombing. It’s awesome from the first...

    Just saw it last night in the imax. Incredible. Best movie experience I’ve had in a long time, and the popcorn was stale. I can’t understand why this movie is bombing. It’s awesome from the first frame to last. The sound of the vehicles is amazing too, the brutality is oppressive but not grotesquely presented, the ending very satisfying.

    12 votes
  12. Comment on Discussion about asexuality, demisexuality, and allosexuality in ~lgbt

    NoblePath
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    I don’t have any comments, but I like hugs a lot so here you are!🤗🤗🤗

    I don’t have any comments, but I like hugs a lot so here you are!🤗🤗🤗

    5 votes
  13. Comment on Why the pandemic probably started in a lab, in five key points (gifted link) in ~science

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    Sorry for the back to backs, it gets confusing whomis saying what! I guess my broader point is that some comments seem to be doing what they claim is happening in tfa:drawing unwarranted...

    Sorry for the back to backs, it gets confusing whomis saying what!

    I guess my broader point is that some comments seem to be doing what they claim is happening in tfa:drawing unwarranted conclusions from other sources.

    1 vote
  14. Comment on Why the pandemic probably started in a lab, in five key points (gifted link) in ~science

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    The consensus is that the evidence available for review falls significantly toward an animal to human infection causing the outbreak. A major problem with then leaping to “It was not a lab leak”...

    The consensus is that the evidence available for review falls significantly toward an animal to human infection causing the outbreak. A major problem with then leaping to “It was not a lab leak” is that a lot of really important data and evidence has been intentionally hidden/withheld/removed/destroyed by the Chinese government. There is also a strong incentive, perhaps well intententioned at least in some cases, for the answer to be “not a lab leak.”

    2 votes
  15. Comment on Why the pandemic probably started in a lab, in five key points (gifted link) in ~science

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    It’s not like they haven’t tried looking. Worse (and more suspicious), the Chinese government has impeded research efforts and hidden/destroyed important data and physical evidence, something that...

    It’s not like they haven’t tried looking. Worse (and more suspicious), the Chinese government has impeded research efforts and hidden/destroyed important data and physical evidence, something that didn’t happen with previous outbreaks.

    2 votes
  16. Comment on Why the pandemic probably started in a lab, in five key points (gifted link) in ~science

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    Iirc, there were identifiable links between wildlife reservoir and outbreak with much shorter distances than 1000 miles, as well as much greater specificity in both the wildlife host and the virus...

    Iirc, there were identifiable links between wildlife reservoir and outbreak with much shorter distances than 1000 miles, as well as much greater specificity in both the wildlife host and the virus found. That is, they found the actual outbreak virus (or an ancestor) in an actual wild animal.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on Why the pandemic probably started in a lab, in five key points (gifted link) in ~science

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    This strikes me as an oversimplificationand generally inapt. There are not laboratories like wiv in every city with a wet market, and there are far more wildlife trading centers in high population...

    This strikes me as an oversimplificationand generally inapt. There are not laboratories like wiv in every city with a wet market, and there are far more wildlife trading centers in high population areas than there are coronavirus research labs, and the coincidences and circumstances extend beyond merely “virises”.

    1 vote
  18. Comment on Why the pandemic probably started in a lab, in five key points (gifted link) in ~science

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    I get where your coming from, but respectfully disagree. Assertions are always the beginning of inquiry. Scientifically, we reformulate assertions as null hypotheses which we then seek to...

    I get where your coming from, but respectfully disagree. Assertions are always the beginning of inquiry. Scientifically, we reformulate assertions as null hypotheses which we then seek to disprove. But they are still assertions.

    Truth is important, and because truth, or its pursuit, leads to unfortunate outcomes is no reason to leave it behind.

    Even some so called “conspiracy theories” are true, and official stories often false.

    Also, it is important to neither promulgate an assertion as true, nor to assume one making an assertion believes it to be true in that moment. Throughout this saga, sober folks have made the claim, “it looks like there could have been a lab leak,” and all kinds of people have heard them saying “China has bio-engineered a virus weapon!” Worse, without comment on the lab leak, folks have pointed out flaws in some assertion or other in an argument about purely natural vectors, only to be shouted down and labeled “conspiracy theorists.”

    5 votes
  19. Comment on Divine Hiddenness argument against God’s existence in ~humanities

    NoblePath
    Link Parent
    I'm sure you're aware of the proposition that we don't recognize some exorbitant percentage of the experiences we encounter, and of that percentage, some exorbitant percentage we don't even...

    I'm sure you're aware of the proposition that we don't recognize some exorbitant percentage of the experiences we encounter, and of that percentage, some exorbitant percentage we don't even register as existing. The remaining percentage, we often wrongly identify it as something we do recognize. This is an ongoing issue with eyewitness testimony, "unidentified aerial phenomena," "unidentified non-aerial phenonomena," etc.

    I challenge you that it will be impossible for you to have any direct connection to god if you have not put in considerable effort to train your consciousness to experience the unrecognizable. It's kind of like those magic eye puzzles. The images are not hidden or obfuscated in any way, we merely have to relax our eye's typical convergence to see. Another example is the wind on the ocean. To me, it's random and chaotic. But a sailor (the actual sailboat kind) looks across the ocean and can see the windspeed and direction for the next 5 minutes. I don't know whether there is any god, but I cannot say there is not until I can say I have made every attempt to see.

    1 vote