NomadicCoder's recent activity

  1. Comment on What will a Chromium-only Web look like? in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
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    That's interesting. What about it made that so difficult?

    That's interesting. What about it made that so difficult?

  2. Comment on What will a Chromium-only Web look like? in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
    Link Parent
    I thought that the primary reason was security -- the old plugin mechanism gave plugins far more control over the changes that they could make to the browser and it was harder to sandbox them.

    Firefox decided to copy Chrome to some extent to make portability easier, though.

    I thought that the primary reason was security -- the old plugin mechanism gave plugins far more control over the changes that they could make to the browser and it was harder to sandbox them.

  3. Comment on Having been on Android for over a decade, I just got my first iPhone! What should I know? in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
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    Galaxies is great, that was one of the early ones that I discovered while playing with the collection. I'm working through your favorites list now, Perl is probably my second favorite so far....

    Galaxies is great, that was one of the early ones that I discovered while playing with the collection. I'm working through your favorites list now, Perl is probably my second favorite so far. Untangle and Net are nice, but not quite as stimulating.

    2 votes
  4. Comment on How OXO conquered the American kitchen in ~design

    NomadicCoder
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    That was my thought... at first I was thinking how nice it would be to never overflow anymore, but then realized that as I'm pouring I'm constantly aiming for the edge to constantly push the...

    That was my thought... at first I was thinking how nice it would be to never overflow anymore, but then realized that as I'm pouring I'm constantly aiming for the edge to constantly push the lesser used grounds back into the center and ensure more thorough extraction.

    1 vote
  5. Comment on Having been on Android for over a decade, I just got my first iPhone! What should I know? in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
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    Those are great! Not overly flashy, right to the point... I like it!

    Those are great! Not overly flashy, right to the point... I like it!

    2 votes
  6. Comment on Having been on Android for over a decade, I just got my first iPhone! What should I know? in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
    Link Parent
    I use the triple click home (iPhone SE 2020) accessibility shortcut to toggle the reduce white point at night -- even at lowest brightness and dark mode I find my phone to be a bit too bright for...

    I use the triple click home (iPhone SE 2020) accessibility shortcut to toggle the reduce white point at night -- even at lowest brightness and dark mode I find my phone to be a bit too bright for my liking, so the reduced white point makes it much better.

    3 votes
  7. Comment on Having been on Android for over a decade, I just got my first iPhone! What should I know? in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
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    Thanks for the game suggestion -- I've had my iPhone for a long time, but never saw that one. I like puzzles like that which don't require a lot of time investment, but can keep you occupied...

    Thanks for the game suggestion -- I've had my iPhone for a long time, but never saw that one. I like puzzles like that which don't require a lot of time investment, but can keep you occupied during those otherwise wasted moments.

    5 votes
  8. Comment on Why Can't Programmers... Program? in ~comp

    NomadicCoder
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    This highlights one of the problems w/ coding interviews, but I think that a person's response to this roadblock is very telling as it also demonstrates their way of thinking. I'd be just fine...

    This highlights one of the problems w/ coding interviews, but I think that a person's response to this roadblock is very telling as it also demonstrates their way of thinking. I'd be just fine with continuing to interview a person if they just said "I don't know how to determine if it's evenly divisible by 3 or 5, so for now let me stub out this method, here's the function prototype, and here's a hard-coded implementation that passes for a few known values as proof of concept..."

    This would show to me that they know how to decompose the problem at least, understand the core algorithm, and to document the areas that need further research.

    I find a person who's willing to identify the areas that they know and don't know clearly, not just guess and hope that I don't notice, and talk through the problem to be a much better candidate than either the person who memorized the solution already or the person who just shuts down and says "I don't know" as the person who does the former is doing exactly what we do with real problems on a regular basis.

    15 votes
  9. Comment on Why Can't Programmers... Program? in ~comp

    NomadicCoder
    Link Parent
    I've interviewed countless people, and completely agree with what Joel is saying in that article. I keep trying to tell our recruiters and my manager that, but it seems that my Zoom call is muted...

    I've interviewed countless people, and completely agree with what Joel is saying in that article. I keep trying to tell our recruiters and my manager that, but it seems that my Zoom call is muted whenever I try to make that point.

    He says:

    In fact, one thing I have noticed is that the people who I consider to be good software developers barely ever apply for jobs at all. I know lots of great people who took a summer internship on a whim and then got permanent offers. They only ever applied for one or two jobs in their lives.

    I don't want to toot, but this, combined with this:

    Those consist of the one guy who happened to be good, but he’s only applying for a job because his wife wants to be nearer to her family,

    ...exactly describe my career path. In high school I used to help a boss's son with his comp sci homework, so he knew me, recruited me to my first internship, then from there it was all being actively recruited rather than searching for jobs. I've interviewed exactly once, and that was when I moved to an entirely new area -- every other job has been them asking me to work for them rather than me asking them for a job.

    I hate to express that too much because it does sound a bit like being a braggart, but the reality is that the best developers that I know don't interview for jobs, and if they do it's more of a formality than an interview.

    Meanwhile, I interview 2 or 3 per week and they can't answer even the most basic problems, even if they have an MS from a prestigious university specialized in the topic at hand. Just today I interviewed somebody for a cybersecurity position, with almost 30 years of accreditations and experience on his resume, who couldn't tell me the difference between symmetric and asymmetric encryption. (this isn't ageism on my part, I graduated the same year that he did)

    10 votes
  10. Comment on I have no capslock and I must scream in ~comp

    NomadicCoder
    Link Parent
    I'm in that very boat. I added a large amount of logging to our system at work around a feature that I implemented. It has been immensely valuable when doing complaint investigations (we're a...

    I'm in that very boat. I added a large amount of logging to our system at work around a feature that I implemented. It has been immensely valuable when doing complaint investigations (we're a regulated industry, this is a required task) to determine the root cause of user problems, but unfortunately the systems that this particular feature is used on the most do not upload logs. I now want to remove a limitation in the feature, badly, as I think it's potentially hurting the user experience, but that feature was added to potentially avoid more critical problems for some users. I do not have the data I need to make a decision so I'm stuck. I wish I had information about how frequently this particular edge case scenario is hit and what the outcome was when it did happen.

    4 votes
  11. Comment on What’s something people commonly misunderstand about you? in ~talk

    NomadicCoder
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    People assume that I’m very conservative, which can hardly be further from the truth. With COVID I grew my hair out (as a guy), hasn’t been cut for over 2 years, which seems to have changed that...

    People assume that I’m very conservative, which can hardly be further from the truth.

    With COVID I grew my hair out (as a guy), hasn’t been cut for over 2 years, which seems to have changed that perception somewhat, but I’ve had far fewer interactions with new people, so hard to say.

    I once even had a guy drive up while I was cleaning the yard, ask if I was a fellow Mormon, then said something like “oh, you just look like it”. That one might be explained by the fact that I’m distantly related to Hinkle according to my mostly Mormon extended family, and some far back relatives were Mormon pioneers, so maybe I just have “that look” even though this exchangee didn’t occur in a predominantly Mormon place. And maybe that also explains the general pigeonhole that I often find myself in.

    It’s frustrating because it’s hard to make likeminded friends because the ultra right people approach, but the left leaning people tend to act awkward and reserved in my presence.

    7 votes
  12. Comment on MoviePass is relaunching with eyeball tracking to earn credits in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
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    This doesn't sound very accessible. What about people with a lazy eye, one eye, extreme light sensitivity requiring dark lenses, blind people who want to listen to movies, etc? Should they not be...

    This doesn't sound very accessible. What about people with a lazy eye, one eye, extreme light sensitivity requiring dark lenses, blind people who want to listen to movies, etc? Should they not be allowed to be customers of the service?

    19 votes
  13. Comment on Always remember - The Therac 25 incident in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
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    I remember covering this in school. I then started my first internship and was working in radiation treatment planning software, which really drove it home as I started having to think about...

    I remember covering this in school. I then started my first internship and was working in radiation treatment planning software, which really drove it home as I started having to think about software risk on a regular basis and has become the theme of my entire career.

    7 votes
  14. Comment on What's the coronavirus like where you are? in ~health.coronavirus

    NomadicCoder
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    Northern CA, I know two people being treated for COVID, one on full vent, who I don't expect to come home, and one on home oxygen after being discharged due to the hospital being over-capacity....

    Northern CA, I know two people being treated for COVID, one on full vent, who I don't expect to come home, and one on home oxygen after being discharged due to the hospital being over-capacity. This is the first time I've personally known anybody with severe disease in the last two years.

    7 votes
  15. Comment on Lessons from a can opener: The obscurity of the "Safety Can Opener" in ~design

    NomadicCoder
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    I hate niche kitchen products that do one job, but one that I love that I bought a long time ago is a can strainer that fits over cans and many glass jars too, and it’s way better than using the...

    I hate niche kitchen products that do one job, but one that I love that I bought a long time ago is a can strainer that fits over cans and many glass jars too, and it’s way better than using the edge of a lid.

    I much prefer the safety can opener, and have one too, though different than the one in the video, mine still requires a squeezing motion with two legs, and has little pinchers to grab and help remove the lid if it doesn’t come off easily after the first cut.

    3 votes
  16. Comment on After ruining Android messaging, Google says iMessage is too powerful in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
    Link Parent
    I also hate Teams, especially as a Linux user. They have an app, but it's unreliable, the UI is a mess, and it takes 2 or 3 tries to connect to every meeting. I complain every time somebody...

    I also hate Teams, especially as a Linux user. They have an app, but it's unreliable, the UI is a mess, and it takes 2 or 3 tries to connect to every meeting. I complain every time somebody schedules w/ Teams over Zoom.

    2 votes
  17. Comment on After ruining Android messaging, Google says iMessage is too powerful in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
    Link Parent
    Snapchat? That has to be the worst user experience that I've ever seen. My kids use it, so I'm stuck using it now and then, and hate it.

    The younger generation is also used to messaging across a variety of platforms - Instagram, Snapchat, Discord - all of which offer a better experience than texting, even with RCS.

    Snapchat? That has to be the worst user experience that I've ever seen. My kids use it, so I'm stuck using it now and then, and hate it.

  18. Comment on Reddit confidentially files to go public in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
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    I've been trying to wean myself off of reddit, after 14.5 years (my current account age), though as others have said there's still a few nuggets hidden in the trash pile. I use a third party app...

    I've been trying to wean myself off of reddit, after 14.5 years (my current account age), though as others have said there's still a few nuggets hidden in the trash pile. I use a third party app and old.reddit.com, which makes the UI a bit more bearable, and have a small set of subreddits that I subscribe to specific to niche interests that are hard to find elsewhere and get their value from the size of the userbase -- local (soon to be former) community subreddits, soon to be local community subreddits, the Tourette Syndrome subreddit (mostly to provide support for others who also have TS), some of the science and technology subreddits. I'm afraid to wander too far out of that safe haven as you quickly start to discover things that you'd rather not. That said, I do find it a useful resource to keep abreast of the pulse of the loopy side of the world by occasionally peeking in some of the ultra-right-wing conspiracy subs, which helps me to better prepare for what I'll be facing the next time I see my extended family.

    2 votes
  19. Comment on The first thing we do, let's kill all the leaf blowers in ~enviro

    NomadicCoder
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    I went full electric on my tools about 15 years ago and would never go back. I'd much rather deal with a cord than storing gas, pouring gas, dealing with hard starts, etc, etc... The only thing...

    I went full electric on my tools about 15 years ago and would never go back. I'd much rather deal with a cord than storing gas, pouring gas, dealing with hard starts, etc, etc...

    The only thing that I miss from the gas blower is that the gas blower was just perfect at idle for some of the final cleanup, and my electric blower with its box emblazoned with "infinitely variable speed control" (aka, 6 discrete steps) is a bit too powerful at the lowest setting. I've been thinking of taking it apart and modifying it to have an even lower speed (was thinking of a low-range, high-range switch), but if I haven't done it in that long, I probably won't ever do it. :)

    5 votes
  20. Comment on Apple's new thing, the iPod (2001) in ~tech

    NomadicCoder
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    I know about that, but the version I paid a bunch for wasn't updated for newer iOS versions, and the newer version is otherwise identical as far as I can tell, just released as a different app.

    I know about that, but the version I paid a bunch for wasn't updated for newer iOS versions, and the newer version is otherwise identical as far as I can tell, just released as a different app.

    1 vote