TemulentTeatotaler's recent activity

  1. Comment on The transatlantic element: psychoanalysis, exile, circulation of ideas and institutionalization between Spain and Argentina in ~humanities

    TemulentTeatotaler
    Link Parent
    As a heads up your link doesn't work. If you note the "expires" you'll see a Unix time stamp that expired two hours ago, and there may be other stuff in there restricting access to the link. For...

    As a heads up your link doesn't work. If you note the "expires" you'll see a Unix time stamp that expired two hours ago, and there may be other stuff in there restricting access to the link.

    For longer links it's probably also a bit easier to do it in text.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on What's the cheapest food that makes you really happy? in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
    Link Parent
    I'm not sure I have much of value to add. Diet is inseparable from psychology, culture, and biology... it's a complicated topic and I'm too uninformed to have much of an opinion. It might be...

    I'd love to think through a tangible way of comparing across the spectrum and it would be great to hear what you think.

    I'm not sure I have much of value to add. Diet is inseparable from psychology, culture, and biology... it's a complicated topic and I'm too uninformed to have much of an opinion.

    It might be impossible to compare across the spectrum? Years ago I had a stint reading gamification literature and the effort to atomize the building blocks of human motivation. People have varying degrees to which they are completionists, explorers, crafters, min-maxers, socializers, griefers, PVPers, etc. In the same way there may be very distinct segments of the population that handle diet/respond to cues differently.

    Some thoughts (take with a grain of MSG):

    • Meals are divisible. You can split one meal into several as leftovers or not finish everything. You can also go a la carte like you mention doing with fast food.

      • Caloric density is one way of assessing food, separate from the possibility that X will eat a X-sized meal. Satiety, glycemic load, or portion size may be other ways. Portions are one of many psychological factors that impact diet. From a CDC pamphlet:

        A study by Rolls et al. tested how adults responded to meals on different days of four different portion sizes of macaroni and cheese. They found that the bigger the portion, the more participants ate. Participants consumed 30% more energy (162 cal) when offered the largest portion (1000g) compared to the smallest portion (500g). They also reported similar ratings of hunger and fullness after each meal despite the intake differences. After the study, only 45% of the subjects reported noticing that there were differences in the size of the portions served.

    • Meals impact the rest of your diet. You may eat less earlier in a day you plan on dining at a restaurant, or you stuff yourself one day and compensate through the week. A finding that people eat a lot of calories when they dine at a fast-casual place might be very misleading.
      The relationship could be pretty complicated (ala Shapley values for players on a sports team), even playing out over months where a subtly unsustainable diet leads to the yoyo-ing that is frequently observed.

    • There are lots of cuisines which makes it tricky to partition into 3 tiers. Some restaurants explicitly target vegetarians or healthy eating and others are going to be primarily oily/fried cuisines.

      • Within a menu there can be huge variety. McDonald's has salads and grilled chicken, but upsells fries and soda.
    • What you consume/order is what matters, not the menu. The second study linked might be an instance of studying what is easily measured, missing that some items are ordered much more frequently. It'd be a pain to study mom 'n pop restaurants properly.
      There has been at least one study that found that healthy options on the menu actually had an adverse impact on what was eaten, due to "vicarious goal fulfillment".

    • There are large social influences on diet. The success of a diet may be better predicted by your friends/friends-of-friends than anything about you. Same with your average weight. Smoking cessation, crime recidivism, your "next tweet" and a variety of other things all converge on the view that your environment has a huge impact on your decisions.
      One thing I loved from an interview on that topic was the interviewee saying (paraphrased) that instead of feeling like that you have less control over your own life you could think of it as your good choices have an influence outside of yourself.

    • Public education about nutrition may be severely lacking. Based on personal experience (e.g., explaining protein as a fraction of total calories instead of "count grams and you're done") and unrelated surveys of things like basic economic literacy I'd bet that's the case. That might result in very different segments of the population (e.g., nutrition facts aren't used/misused by some).

    Well, I'm typing too much and not saying much so I'll just call it here.

    1 vote
  3. Comment on What's the cheapest food that makes you really happy? in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
    Link Parent
    Thanks for the recommendations, I'll have to try rooibos! My username is coming from a proclivity for bad wordplay, abstention from alcohol, but also a fondness for green tea.

    Thanks for the recommendations, I'll have to try rooibos!

    My username is coming from a proclivity for bad wordplay, abstention from alcohol, but also a fondness for green tea.

    1 vote
  4. Comment on What's the cheapest food that makes you really happy? in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
    Link Parent
    Thanks for the detailed response! Liquefied candied pecans sounds amazing... those are some Redwall-tier descriptions you got there.

    Thanks for the detailed response!

    Liquefied candied pecans sounds amazing... those are some Redwall-tier descriptions you got there.

    1 vote
  5. Comment on What's the cheapest food that makes you really happy? in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
    Link Parent
    Do you have any favorite honeys? A couple years ago I gave Pitcairn Island honey as a gift (luckily ordered 8 months in advance) to someone who was a fan of explorers and it got me curious as to...

    Do you have any favorite honeys? A couple years ago I gave Pitcairn Island honey as a gift (luckily ordered 8 months in advance) to someone who was a fan of explorers and it got me curious as to what's out there.

    As a kid I remember liking slightly stale marshmallows more than fresh ones... enjoying the image of you having a marshmallow cellar and offering guests Trader Joe's with a good vintage.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on What's the cheapest food that makes you really happy? in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
    Link Parent
    It was less a defense of fast food and more a critique of restaurants. No argument here about fast food being fairly unhealthy or contributing to obesity. I just think restaurants haven't had the...

    pretty disingenuous.

    It was less a defense of fast food and more a critique of restaurants.

    while fast food menus are scrutinized, by some, it is because they were identified as one of the main contributing factors of widespread obesity

    No argument here about fast food being fairly unhealthy or contributing to obesity. I just think restaurants haven't had the same reckoning.

    Portion size in the US is wild. I almost exclusively cook for myself now, but my limited experience with the average restaurant has been opaque nutrition information, heavy use of fat/sugar, and enough food for 2-3 meals. Former housemates working in a variety of non-chain food industry jobs have corroborated that experience.

    incredibly calorie dense... as someone who lives in a country with obesity problems I don't think that's what the majority of the US population is after.

    From a different angle this supports what I think is a safe intuition: animals love calorie dense food. It tastes great and is habit forming.

    Being successful as a restaurant is already incredibly hard. Doubly for non-chains. A fairly healthy restaurant is going to be able to look at almost any dish they make and have the option to make it a little more delicious by adding a little more fat/sugar/salt to make it taste better.

    There's a perverse incentive for restaurants to act healthy while adding the same things fast food restaurants did to keep you coming back.

    Fast food has the countervailing forces of low profit margins and public scrutiny to keep them at least a little honest. You know a Big Mac is roughly 550 calories. It's not the healthiest but it's a full meal if you want it to be. McD grilled chicken I think you can call reasonably healthy, other problems you mentioned aside.

    I'm definitely open to being wrong, but I'm trying to think what a good test/comparison would be. Diet is a complicated.

    1 vote
  7. Comment on Bo Burnham - Welcome to the Internet (2021) in ~music

    TemulentTeatotaler
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    A guess would be that it is pointing to the time Google (beta in '98, moved to Palo Alto in '99) blew up. Google was a bit of a paradigm shift into what the modern internet is, where "engagement"...

    A guess would be that it is pointing to the time Google (beta in '98, moved to Palo Alto in '99) blew up.

    Google was a bit of a paradigm shift into what the modern internet is, where "engagement" is optimized through various signals being fed into an algorithm with the goal of sucking you in to their platform. The old paradigm (through rose-colored glasses) might be thought of as more human-curated.

    The 2 year-old in 1999 would grow up having some of the biggest companies with the brightest people engineering ways of addicting or manipulating them.

    *Which would make the "we" the Googles/Facebooks/Baidus of the world, the data/surveillance capitalists.

    The criticism from Bo would be directed at the increasing sophistication of technology that can understand and undermine our squishy human parts.

    Cambridge Analytica can figure out how best to appeal to the 80k voters in the U.S. that other models say are the relevant swing voters and everyone is worse off for it. Without that technology you'd have to guess at what is desirable to a lot of people instead of persuasive to an individual.

    Similarly, Facebook can figure out exactly how annoying they can be with ads without having you leave, and they may realize that getting you angry is actually increasing your engagement.

    7 votes
  8. Comment on What are some great LGBT speculative fiction? in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
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    Not a member of the LGBT community so I can't answer from that perspective, but from the wiki list Le Guin's Left Hand of Darkness and Sarah Waters' Fingersmith are great books. Bechdel's (of...

    Not a member of the LGBT community so I can't answer from that perspective, but from the wiki list Le Guin's Left Hand of Darkness and Sarah Waters' Fingersmith are great books.

    Bechdel's (of Bechdel test notoriety) Essential Dykes to Watch Out For might be a good one, too? *Her Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic might be a better choice from her. It's pretty short, and more self-contained.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on What's the cheapest food that makes you really happy? in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
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    White cheddar macaroni, tuna, and optionally some parmesan/feta cheese on top is amazing. Stir fry is great and flexible. The sauce gives you variety and flavor, noodles or rice as a carb base...

    White cheddar macaroni, tuna, and optionally some parmesan/feta cheese on top is amazing.

    Stir fry is great and flexible. The sauce gives you variety and flavor, noodles or rice as a carb base makes it cheap, and the veggie/protein choice keeps is healthy. I made some today with some frozen veggies (corn, sugar snap peas, broccoli, red pepper, etc.). Tossed in some scrambled eggs, tofu, and two types of beans.

    The batter for spanakopita (spinach pie) is a lot easier to prepare than the full dish and it tastes great on some toast.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on What's the cheapest food that makes you really happy? in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Fast food got a bad reputation, in the U.S. at least. Some of that is from its history, which included things like not changing cooking oil leading to trans fats and using cheap ingredients....

    Fast food got a bad reputation, in the U.S. at least. Some of that is from its history, which included things like not changing cooking oil leading to trans fats and using cheap ingredients. That's combined with the availability heuristic: people have seen hundreds of "McDonalds does X" articles because it's served billions, regardless of the relative prevalence.

    Some classism may also be at play. Tom Burrell, the "first black man in advertising", had a semi-famous campaign about McDonald's being a positive place to eat/work for, but for the most part Fast Food jobs are used to threaten kids to study hard. Broadly you have people who have the time|education to cook for themselves or the money to eat at restaurants, and then you have those that depend on fast food or are stuck in food deserts

    To my knowledge this reputation isn't really deserved. Fast food is often much healthier for you than eating at a restaurant. Their menus are much more standardized and subject to more scrutiny. Restaurants compete for you as a returning customer by slabbing on the delicious stuff (fat, salt, sugar).

    Frozen foods may have had a similar issues. The first generation offerings may not have tasted great/overused preservatives, and were a sign that you were a kid in a single-parent home or had no partner.

    *The view that MegaCorps destroy family-owned businesses could be another factor. Or manipulation from existing food/agriculture interests... the "food pyramid" was possibly a result of that sort of manipulation.

    2 votes
  11. Comment on What are you reading these days? in ~books

    TemulentTeatotaler
    (edited )
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    I've started Andy Weir's most recent book, Project Hail Mary. It's pretty good so far. The dialogue isn't the strongest but it's sort of like watching someone else try to solve a puzzle room or an...

    I've started Andy Weir's most recent book, Project Hail Mary. It's pretty good so far. The dialogue isn't the strongest but it's sort of like watching someone else try to solve a puzzle room or an adult version of Dora the Explorer, which I'm finding enjoyable.

    *Finished Project Hail Mary and moved on to Atul Gawande's Keep Sharp (good tour of the topic for a lay audience so far!)

    PHM was much better than The Martian in my opinion. Maybe a little less grounded in the hard sci-fi part of it, but the human element and the stakes were much more appealing. The dialogue/characterization I commented on ended up being necessary to tell the story he wanted to.

    1 vote
  12. Comment on I need help with a story that involves math in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
    Link Parent
    I think I've guessed the plot of Independence Day 3: aliens attempt psychological warfare via something like that book until a scrappy Indianian physician gets it set to 3.2 by government fiat. A...

    when you measured it, you discovered that it had a value for Pi of 3.0

    I think I've guessed the plot of Independence Day 3: aliens attempt psychological warfare via something like that book until a scrappy Indianian physician gets it set to 3.2 by government fiat.

    A related mildly interesting thing about circles on computers is that since pixels are (typically) rectangular, the perimeter is actually 4 times the diameter.

    if you continue to calculate Pi far enough, way, way down, around the 10 billionth digit, it stops being random, has a long string of digits that map out an image of a circle.

    I was going to say that every sequence of numbers exists within π somewhere, but that's not certain, just likely. At some offset of pi you might find the decimal representation of an mp4 that would play a video of your life from start to end.

  13. Comment on Hi, how are you? Mental health support and discussion thread (June 2021) in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
    (edited )
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    Content warning: suicide, sexual abuse, spousal abuse I'm hurting a lot, but hopefully starting to move in the right direction. I wrote a much-needed letter which led to a much-needed talk. This...
    • Exemplary

    Content warning: suicide, sexual abuse, spousal abuse

    I'm hurting a lot, but hopefully starting to move in the right direction.

    I wrote a much-needed letter which led to a much-needed talk. This person and I dated in college, and we got back in touch a couple years ago as friends. We got along great. Long conversations that effortlessly shifted between laughing, interesting topics, and reflections on mutual maturing.

    At the start of last year she got distant, and I didn't really know why. There were lots of possible answers... her career and life were in a bit of tumult. This year all the communication we had was a brief post-Trump text. Attempts I made to reach out weren't working, and I wanted to write to say the dynamic wasn't working for me, wish her the best, and move on.

    She responded immediately, apologized, and we talked. Her explanation of the distance was that COVID magnified her loneliness and talking with me made her starkly aware of what she didn't have in her life, and that hurt was dealt with by some soft-ghosting. Then last December she started dating someone, with things getting serious enough that she didn't feel right continuing communication with an ex.

    We parted on good terms, and the situation resolved in a much better way than I could've hoped for, but it aches.

    The impetus for the letter was the anniversary of rough event from last year that has me taking inventory of my life. I was sorta friends with a cool lady that was trying to build a life for herself. She was socially conscious, hilarious, and had the undertones of warmth peaking out from a punk's veneer. She moved to Portland with her girlfriend and for a span I tried to help her on a career doing web design/we shared goofy shit like the competitive worm charmin' sport.

    She went silent for a month. Then her family posts that she committed suicide on her Twitter. I make the mistake of clicking on her partner's profile (didn't know them) and found her partner moved home, Tweeted some heart-breaking heart-broken shit, then killed herself as well.

    I think none of this would be a problem if I was more resilient, or without a lifetime of trauma.

    I grew up in a house with spousal abuse. My earliest memories include my mom getting pushed down stairs or having her head slammed in a freezer. I grew up with accusations of sexual abuse of me and my brother. Particularly damaging was that my brother was sexually assaulted to protect me/in my stead.

    Those accusations were almost certainly not true, though it took two decades for me to get the nerve to ask questions. My mom's had a string of partners she's estranged by being verbally abusive, accused her brothers of sexually abusing their children, and a whole host of other things that my brother--working psychologist-- believes is BPD and maybe some CPTSD.

    Both of my parents had screwed up lives. My mom was the youngest of a family with an alcoholic dad and food insecurity, neglected somewhere as a child where rats crawled over her, and so on. My dad had a brother who tried to kill him as a child, a mom who had him spy on an unfaithful husband, and at the time of my parents separation at 5 he was working for his father who used that power over him in some nasty ways. They both love their kids, and they both have good sides.

    I'm likely on the spectrum (stimmed, hit my head, overloaded by touch/sound, etc.) and was selectively mute for a few years as a kid, but I was "gifted" and slipped through the cracks. Poor school district.

    When I moved to a wealthier school district I was still in that "gifted" bucket, but I didn't have the infrastructure. My parents are smart people but they didn't graduate highschool, so while I did well on tests I wasn't like some friends who were #1 in state math competitions or getting full-ride scholarships to Ivy Leagues. I didn't want to replace lost textbooks or get glasses because my mom cried and stressed over finances (apparently we were very close to eviction at least once). The dysfunction/over-active empathy I had made me focus little on myself and much on the world. Fantasy/sci-fi were fuel for the hope that an individual could change the world, but reality was telling me I wasn't that individual.

    When I was 14 I met a girl on a night that felt otherworldly. I don't have the writing skills to convey that, or her. I snuck out and was playing the clarinet on a hill leading to a soccer field and she joined in with her voice from around a corner. We stayed like that for a good while... just improvising and exploring a stranger through sound. It's funny how much you can convey like that... your curiosity, your willingness to support someone where they fumble, intensity.

    Eventually we talked and became friends. She was a portal to a secret place, distant from school and home and the limitations of the well-traveled path of orthodox adolescence. She (Sarah) was a couple years older, and through her I was introduced to Ken, who was a couple years older than her. And Ken was someone it seemed like everything was routed through, and better for it. He was just warmth incarnate, kind to a fault. The sort of guy that if he was being mugged would ask if they needed his shoes (if they needed them).

    Through Ken, with Sarah, I met weird and cool people (e.g., chaos magic cult members). I didn't get to be around them often or consistently, and the taboo and random payout probably only needlessly heightened how enamoured I was. My first true friends and community. Map points and raves in abandoned farms or warehouses that wound down discussing Hakim Bey. Adults willing to listen to a dumb 15 year old that read a few works from an omnibus of Nietzsche because the binding looked cool, deep blue with aged paper.

    I thought that's where my future was. That the value of someone that wouldn't thrive in the conventional path had value in their willingness to explore things that hadn't been explored. That's the gamblers mindset: if I just get repeatedly lucky this $1 can turn into $1,000.

    Ken was bipolar. When I was 16 he went out of country to a lot of fanfare and expectation, and while there he killed himself. It's impossible to express (or recall) everything, but I had massive guilt for the pressure put on him. Massive self-worth issues because I heard about his passing indirectly, and the community that I had been close to dissolved or rejected me.

    For a month after that I did everything I could to comfort Sarah. We were closer than ever, as close as I hoped we'd be in other circumstances. Every smile or laugh hid an iceberg of hurt. She was breaking in slow motion and I couldn't fix it... and all the ego of an all-around "gifted" kid smashed into reality. I'm useless.

    After a night that had lots of those smiles and laughs we went to where she was staying. She pushed me on a couch and straddled me, and that was my first time having sex. She flinched when I tried to kiss her so I stopped. She didn't register my confusion/numbness/lack of affirmation. After we were just near each other, sharing a borrowed flat.

    My memories are very flawed, but especially from that period, and especially from that month. I think I recall waiting until she was sleeping before going to the bathroom in a trance and curling up on the floor. Other times when I'm like that I've scratched the flesh off an arm, just mindless.

    I can't recall details but she left that morning and I never heard from or about her again. I presume she's dead but I've never gotten to close that loop.

    It took a very long time to talk about any of this, and longer to say that what happened wasn't okay. Years later I watched the movie Perks of Being a Wallflower and it wrecked my shit. I might be misremembering, but the heaviest bit being the girl telling the boy (who had been molested) that she ~"wanted his first time to be with someone who loved him".

    It was the emotion Sarah was putting off all that month, that she was already gone but lingered to try to care for me. She'd been abused, through things that she wouldn't talk about. I didn't force her to, when I could have. It was hard to get past the fear that she saw me like that on the bathroom floor, realized she'd ignored my reluctance, that she'd hurt the person she loved.

    I was a zombie for a year after that. A zombie good at hiding its decay. My path out was to pretend there was some sort of greater meaning to what our friend group was, and their deaths. Like I was on some hunt for a psychological/philosophical seed crystal or prion (take that viral marketers?) that would let one person terraform the world, inspired by our time together. Find the right idea--something that spreads-- that will stop all the ugliness that hurt the people I cared about.

    It's that gambler's mindset; an excuse to indulge in self-harm and isolation. I tried (mostly successfully) to not let my problems/trauma be anyone else's. The person I wrote to today saw me in some states that made her think I had PTSD, but the dark stuff she was spared from, and we had a mutually positive relationship.

    Eventually I worked my way through the teen stuff, but I'm left a bit with the aftermath.

    I don't really have any friends. I pushed some away because I felt unhealthy to be around. I didn't make new ones because I was preoccupied and overwhelmed with other things. There's a bit of a "gap in my resume" from living a weird life that makes a lot of conversations either dishonest or burdensome.

    Besides that, I moved to my hometown ~5 years ago to care for ailing parents. The better off one was just lonely and socially isolated.

    The other is disabled (vertigo, Meniere's) and will require emotional/financial/physical support probably until she passes. Many of her teeth are rotting and it's been just shy of 2 years trying to find a dentist willing to accommodate her (real or imagined) allergies, pain threshold, and disability. Smoking and bone less doesn't help either. It will cost a good chunk of a house and not be a permanent fix. Most conversations with her involve breaking down in tears.

    My last (long distance) relationship ended with being ghosted for a month--> sent/tagged in photos of her self-harm-->mentions she was afraid she'd stab me if I was around her-->a 90 page tirade that alternated between how much she loved me and how terrible I am-->increasingly unstable emails (e.g., baby talk). She had a flair up of BPD, grad school/family/life stress and I had to break contact. I hated not being able to help but I was making the situation worse.

    Yikes... I'm just rambling now.

    Basically, there was a lot of shit that I dealt/deal with by being numb. I'm challenging that status quo. I'm keeping a good diet and exercise. Now that I'm vaccinated I'm going to try to find something social to be part of. I'm taking care of some long-delayed things, and generally just starting to be open to trying again.

    It hurts, and everything is a bit raw, but I think it'll get easier and that I'm moving in the right direction.

    23 votes
  14. Comment on I need help with a story that involves math in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
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    Possibly of interest would be things like the Casimir effect where you have virtual particles spontaneously come into being in pairs that typically shortly after mutually annihilate. You "bend the...

    Possibly of interest would be things like the Casimir effect where you have virtual particles spontaneously come into being in pairs that typically shortly after mutually annihilate. You "bend the rules" by borrowing energy but correct things before it matters.

    (apologies to physics folks for inaccuracies)

    1 vote
  15. Comment on I need help with a story that involves math in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
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    To elaborate, there's a lot of "approximate but accurate" math done in computing. One of the notable examples is the fast inverse square root early 3D games relied on. But there's also a ton of...

    To elaborate, there's a lot of "approximate but accurate" math done in computing. One of the notable examples is the fast inverse square root early 3D games relied on.

    But there's also a ton of scientific computing/symbolic manipulation software out there that just formalizes the same strict logic you'd be going through on a paper.

    Here's a quick example of the rounding error stuff. Depending on the order of calculations or the data type used you get different results.

    I'd say just go for it and don't explain it! House of Leaves does this with measuring dimensions of a house (e.g., the interior measure of a room is slightly larger than the exterior) and it was really unsettling. Some Borges / Lovecraft could be good inspiration, too?

    4 votes
  16. Comment on I need help with a story that involves math in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
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    I'm not sure all your requirements can be met? Not a math wiz, so maybe someone else would give a better answer. There are things like sneaky hardware defects, or cosmic rays unpredictably...

    I'm not sure all your requirements can be met? Not a math wiz, so maybe someone else would give a better answer.

    There are things like sneaky hardware defects, or cosmic rays unpredictably flipping a bit, or simple programmer errors like trying to use doubles instead of decimals for currency math.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on Hi, how are you? Mental health support and discussion thread (June 2021) in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
    Link Parent
    You might try a biography of David Foster Wallace like Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story. It's been a while since I read it, but it seemed to give some insight into a complicated person who ended...

    You might try a biography of David Foster Wallace like Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story. It's been a while since I read it, but it seemed to give some insight into a complicated person who ended up committing suicide.

    A DFW quote on the topic:

    The so-called ‘psychotically depressed’ person who tries to kill herself doesn’t do so out of quote ‘hopelessness’ or any abstract conviction that life’s assets and debits do not square. And surely not because death seems suddenly appealing. The person in whom Its invisible agony reaches a certain unendurable level will kill herself the same way a trapped person will eventually jump from the window of a burning high-rise. Make no mistake about people who leap from burning windows. Their terror of falling from a great height is still just as great as it would be for you or me standing speculatively at the same window just checking out the view; i.e. the fear of falling remains a constant. The variable here is the other terror, the fire’s flames: when the flames get close enough, falling to death becomes the slightly less terrible of two terrors. It’s not desiring the fall; it’s terror of the flames. And yet nobody down on the sidewalk, looking up and yelling ‘Don’t!’ and ‘Hang on!’, can understand the jump. Not really. You’d have to have personally been trapped and felt flames to really understand a terror way beyond falling.

    If you ever would like a person to talk to let me know. I'd be happy to be a sounding board!

    Without going into a lot of detail here, I grew up around a lot of dysfunction and have had some experience with some adjacent topics.

    5 votes
  18. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

    TemulentTeatotaler
    Link Parent
    Earthbound was a childhood favorite! I'm currently very slowly working my way through OMORI, which along with Undertale and some others draw heavily from EB. When I was ~6 by older brother got in...

    Earthbound was a childhood favorite! I'm currently very slowly working my way through OMORI, which along with Undertale and some others draw heavily from EB.

    When I was ~6 by older brother got in trouble for trading some stuff on the blacktop to another kid for Earthbound. I guess that would make it the first RPG I ever played/watched.

    The mood of it hits you immediately. The puns, meta elements, music, novel mechanics, heart, and the moments of surprising darkness. I never played Mother 3 but the pacing of the end of BuzzBuzz reminded me of a roommate playing Mother 3 where...

    spoilers a father looking for his family is told there's good news and bad news. (paraphased) "The good news is we found you a great new weapon! The bad news is... it was buried in your wife's heart." Cue drunken rage where the father starts attacking other town members.

    I know they're classics, but they made millions of them

    It seems like only ~140k Earthbound cartridges were sold in the U.S., initially 75k.

    When it was released it sort of flopped, which may have been due to being prohibitively pricey. It was packaged with a players guide that was made in the style of a travel guide, and included things like scratch 'n sniff stickers.

    4 votes
  19. Comment on Can you tell the difference between a one million dollar cello and a $5,000 cello? in ~music

    TemulentTeatotaler
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    It's important to have tests like these double-blinded. Knowing you're dealing with a Stradivarius can effect the way you play or prime the way you listen in a powerful way. Even the order you...

    It's important to have tests like these double-blinded. Knowing you're dealing with a Stradivarius can effect the way you play or prime the way you listen in a powerful way. Even the order you listen or the warm-up of the musician can throw some bias in.

    To my knowledge when it's been properly studied, professional musicians can't really tell the difference between a top-end professional instrument and the $1mil+ instruments.

    A bit coincidentally I was listening to a cello-heavy music group. If you like cellos you might like Zoe Keating who has a couple "One Cello x 16" albums.

    10 votes
  20. Comment on What features would you add to languages? in ~talk

    TemulentTeatotaler
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    In online communication you're able to have much more rigidly defined rules: XKCD-->4chan created r9k where reposts are not permitted, to promote unique conversation. Various games limit the sort...

    My original question seems to pit psychology/society against language, so I'm going to follow up with a sub-question about spaces where language is managed

    In online communication you're able to have much more rigidly defined rules:

    • XKCD-->4chan created r9k where reposts are not permitted, to promote unique conversation.
    • Various games limit the sort of ways you can communicate to a narrowed vocabulary of "emotes".
    • Recently there was some ML-based tool that could detect and censor(?) hate speech/slurs in real-time.

    Assuming you had the ability to pin down or apply programmatic rules to a language that you may have in an online/managed space, would your answer to the original question change?

    Some examples may be:

    • Word vectors are used to occasionally randomly swap out some non-critical words in a sentence to close neighbors. This might promote diversity of vocabulary, or at least provide a shield of plausible deniability for non-native speakers of a language?
      The king suzerain is dead.
    • A quickly abandoned idea I had was a cryptocurrency-esque forum, after hearing an interview on the value "friction" provides. To push back against increasingly sophisticated natural language bots/trolls/super-users dominating a conversation--or just encourage parsimony of speech-- each post|word would require some sort of gated resource.
      Besides serving as a parallel cryptocurrency, the first lexcoin transaction in the ledger would be used to post a comment? Quickly abandoned. Quickly.
    • Expanding on the idea of an AI intermediary between harassing sender and recipient in games: it becomes common to have a personal AI that morphs communication before passing it to you.
      A judge hearing the voice of a defendant hears it in the voice of a 25 y.o. British lady.
      As a child grows up, sentences spoken to them are translated into the most age-appropriate language to understand it.
      A person with PTSD has triggering references removed or the full-context muted.
    2 votes