beanie's recent activity

  1. Comment on Job hunts after a toxic work experience in ~life

    beanie
    Link Parent
    I moved from a pretty liberal city in the west coast to a suburbs in the midwest and I strongly believe that this behavior is a related to the culture here (where issues of racism, bigotry and...

    I moved from a pretty liberal city in the west coast to a suburbs in the midwest and I strongly believe that this behavior is a related to the culture here (where issues of racism, bigotry and sexism are debatable) although it'll be unfair to say that all the residents here are sexist, racist bigots. My significant other and I are planning on moving to a place that resonance with our views. Fingers crossed!

    8 votes
  2. Comment on Job hunts after a toxic work experience in ~life

    beanie
    Link Parent
    Therapy and yoga (and meditation) is central to my self-care in helping me cope with these experiences. I like the added suggestion of martial arts. I feel the discipline and mindfulness of...

    Therapy and yoga (and meditation) is central to my self-care in helping me cope with these experiences. I like the added suggestion of martial arts. I feel the discipline and mindfulness of martial arts (and many other forms of physical fitness/team sports) offer practice in the idea of respecting the process, respecting yourself and respecting others. It offers practice in really honing in on targets which can offer benefits in other aspects in my life as I try to tackle issues with precision. I think I'll extend my physical practice to include martial arts.

    7 votes
  3. Comment on Job hunts after a toxic work experience in ~life

    beanie
    Link Parent
    I've been working with a therapist and doing some moc-interviews. A recruiter got in touch with me the other day and I've been keeping in mind the mindset you've mentioned: seeing interviews as...

    I've been working with a therapist and doing some moc-interviews. A recruiter got in touch with me the other day and I've been keeping in mind the mindset you've mentioned: seeing interviews as practice and to build my self confidence.

    As for your second suggestion: I'll try my best, sounds good.

    8 votes
  4. Comment on Job hunts after a toxic work experience in ~life

    beanie
    Link Parent
    Thank you for this advice. I have to remind myself that the last job I had was *particularly a toxic work environment compared to my previous ones. I unfortunately wasn't able to find/cultivate...

    Thank you for this advice. I have to remind myself that the last job I had was *particularly a toxic work environment compared to my previous ones. I unfortunately wasn't able to find/cultivate allies (male nor female - males were quick to deny anything was wrong (one stating they've become nose blind to the issues and to stop "correcting" them) and females were too few and unwilling to say anything for fear of retribution). I should see this work place as an anomaly (although bits and pieces of what I've experienced can be seen in other places, just not to this degree). I have tried to keep people accountable for their actions, but I plan on doing this sooner/stronger (I'll keep in mind your approach) and, to add, I want to invite HR to the conversation as soon as it happens.

    Thank you again, I'll add these tactics to my tool belt.

    5 votes
  5. Comment on Job hunts after a toxic work experience in ~life

    beanie
    Link Parent
    That might be a goal of mine in the future! I definitely need to set up a financial/business plan. For now, I'm looking to gain experience and capital until I can get there (and my professional...

    That might be a goal of mine in the future! I definitely need to set up a financial/business plan. For now, I'm looking to gain experience and capital until I can get there (and my professional engineering license).

    6 votes
  6. Comment on Job hunts after a toxic work experience in ~life

    beanie
    Link Parent
    I studied civil/environmental engineering. Most of my experience has been in the construction field (a field I am looking to move out of). I can't speak to your feelings of being tired, I can only...

    I studied civil/environmental engineering. Most of my experience has been in the construction field (a field I am looking to move out of).

    I can't speak to your feelings of being tired, I can only speak to my own. Me feeling "tired" can be an indication of me feeling helpless and not wanting to admit there is nothing I can do (out of pride): I can't change the past nor the present world to be more inclusive and less insensitive to diversity. The feeling of "distrust" that I have can be a feeling that is trying to keep me safe: if I avoid people/situations altogether then there's a 100% chance I won't be mistreated. I'm frustrated by these feelings because it is stopping me from living the life I want to live/achieving my goals.

    Why do you feel tired and distrusting of people? I understand if you're not ready to answer that question, sometimes questions like that can bring up and remind us of uncomfortable situations/experiences.

    5 votes
  7. Job hunts after a toxic work experience

    I terminated my position over 4 months ago and I'm still not able to apply for jobs. I'm frustrated with my inability to move on from the previous toxic work environments. My background is in a...

    I terminated my position over 4 months ago and I'm still not able to apply for jobs. I'm frustrated with my inability to move on from the previous toxic work environments. My background is in a male dominated field and there was always something either insensitive, sexist or racist said in all my previous workplaces. I feel, I know I'm going to be met with some sort of comment in my next work place and I no longer want to put myself in those situations anymore. I don't know how I'll react, I feel like I may explode if I hear another ignorant phrase.

    I want to be able to make money. People say I must not have liked what I did very much if I wasn't able to put up with the comments. Other people say that that's just how the world is, "get used to it!" I've also heard that I'm just going to have to wait for change because drastic/fast pace change causes recoil. All of these comments literally tell me to suck it up and allow the same rhetoric to propagate. And, of course, all of this has been told to me by white men, those who aren't effected by the comments said to me.

    Things that have happened to me or that were said to me:

    • Smile more
    • I'm too soft spoken/nice
    • I'm too aggressive
    • "Do you want to fix your hair?"
    • A project manager bought me hair product, I didn't ask. I have curly hair and it took me a long time to love my curls, but it's seen as "unprofessional"
    • A Director was staring at my hair throughout an entire interview
    • "I'll put you up there" when the males were talking about strip clubs
    • "Why are women crazy?"
    • I've been kissed on my face and told "if only I met you before my wife"... never had a fucking conversation outside work with this person. I didn't even speak to him more than once a week!
    • "We were surprised that you and Mohammad spoke English". Both me and Mohammad were born and raised in the United States. When I responded with "Why did you guys think that?" they conveniently stumbled and changed the subject.
      ... Many more things happened, but require too much context.

    I just don't get it. Am I suppose to let ALL these things slide? Am I suppose to hold empathy for people who don't have empathy for me? Who don't empathize with me and how what they have said may have made me feel? Should I forgive people who would rather hide the fact that they said something rather than apologize? (And yes, I filed reports for some of these comments/experiences and the rhetoric was "She got X fired", not "X's own behavior got them fired".)

    And more importantly, how do I move on from this knowing that it's going to happen again? The last job had the most amount of sexism in it. The thing about sexism (and racism) is that it's meant to make you feel devalued, and shocker, I felt devalued. It took me so long to gain my self confidence back. And I want so badly to protect myself. I never want to feel those feelings again. But the world is still sexist and racist and homophobic and xenophobic... all the phobics. And how do I tell my next work place that the reason why I left and why I took a break from working was to deal with the emotional repercussions from a very toxic/sexist work environment (when workplaces see whistle blowers as a red flag)? And how to I prepare my little sister who is in college studying a male dominated field knowing that she'll have to deal with the same things I went through?

    It's been 4 months and I'm still angry and still jobless. I've grown to hate social interactions for fear of someone saying some ignorant shit. I've grown a distrust of all people. I hate how much this thing has affected me, how belittled I feel and how I can't move on from this. I feel emotionally paralyzed and money is running out and jobs are hard to come by especially because I'm not white nor am I a male and my hair isn't straight Billie Holiday - I Love My Man.

    I'm tired of confusing people with how my looks don't match my attitude/personality that they've been conditionally taught to think it was like. I'm tired of confusing people with how unashamed I am of my existence.

    23 votes
  8. Comment on What creative projects have you been working on? in ~creative

    beanie
    Link
    A couple of things: Starting some seedlings: I need more patience Trying to build a vermin-compost: trying. Making a beret! It'll be yellow! =]

    A couple of things:

    1. Starting some seedlings: I need more patience
    2. Trying to build a vermin-compost: trying.
    3. Making a beret! It'll be yellow! =]
    2 votes
  9. Comment on Does anyone else take other people's negativity pretty badly? in ~talk

    beanie
    (edited )
    Link
    This is only my opinion, so take it if it works for you. I used to be strongly affected by other people's moods. I wouldn't be able to do much if someone in the room was feeling a "negative"...

    This is only my opinion, so take it if it works for you.

    I used to be strongly affected by other people's moods. I wouldn't be able to do much if someone in the room was feeling a "negative" feeling. I would try and fix it sometimes. Now I know it's just better to listen.

    Side bar: I dislike describing feelings/moods as "negative" and "positive". I feel that all feelings should be viewed as just that: feelings. When we call certain feelings "negative", I feel that it furthers the stigmatization of these "negative" emotions (anger, sadness, frustration, depressed, etc.) and tells us to be ashamed to feel those feelings or vocalize those feelings. I prefer to view feelings as indicators. I'm angry. Why am I angry? Because I've felt an injustice. How can I proactively meet or deal with this feeling? Have a done enough of my own emotional work to respond or act constructively? I have a view where my feelings are valid and there was some sort of evolutionary incentive for them: to tell me something that can lead to a possible action. Now that we are pretty safe from predators, it's our responsibility to regulate our own emotions (and lend help to those if we have the energy/expertise to) so that they don't over-react in an unhealthy manner.

    After doing some of my own emotional work, I realized why I am so effected by other people's emotions and why other people may be affected by my emotions. I found 2 things. 1. The way I was raised made me feel responsible for other people's emotions. I was told to put others instead of myself (most females are taught this). I was raised in a house with emotionally unstable parents, so I was always on alert to make sure everything was good to avoid an outburst from them. 2. People are stuck in their own brains. How they react to the world is a projection of how they see the world. When someone is reacting however they react, it's an indication on their thought process. So, when someone doesn't like something that I did, for example, and they get super frustrated, I see it as a projection of their own thought process. I did something that they hate about themselves. (Should I hate this thing about me as they hate it of me?) Dare I say: when another person is having a "negative" emotion, we get angry at them because we hate ourselves for having that negative emotion? So we perhaps are projecting? We may even say they are ungrateful for all the lovely things that are happening to them. What I'm saying, we sometimes use other people as mirrors for ourselves. I mean, we see the world through our own eyes and brain. So, all that we experience is in our own brain. So, if another person's emotions or actions is bothering us, it's more like it's reminding us of an experience that is trying to tell us something. Go deeper. What's that experience telling you? (for males: is it remind you that you are taught not to have emotions, that emotions are weak, that you are around a weak person, that it's reminding you that you are weak).

    What helps me: understanding that other people's emotions belong to them. I recently started volunteering at a cat adoption center. Being around all these cats, I learned not to take hormones, emotions or personality traits personally. Sometimes a cat be on one. Maybe something happened to them that I wasn't around to witness that's effecting them. Maybe they were abused. Why should I internalize and feel responsible for every emotion/personality trait/action of another being? Hand the responsibility back to them. Be yourself and your best self that you can. Be the person the cat can trust. Show them by example. If I start feeling responsibility for every action/emotion of another being, it leads to codependency. Hand the emotion back. Question why you are having an emotion or why you're reacting to another person's emotion. I've learned a lot more about myself that way and I'm a lot less reactive when other people have a "negative" emotion. And, going all the way to "positive" emotion, I can't chase that extreme either, I love drugs too much to chase those. You guessed it: it's better to be centered/it's about that balance.

    3 votes
  10. Comment on What have you been eating, drinking, and cooking? in ~food

    beanie
    Link
    I made kimchi recently, it was delicious!

    I made kimchi recently, it was delicious!

    1 vote
  11. Comment on Fitness Weekly Discussion in ~health

    beanie
    Link
    For about 3 months now, my work-outs have been solely yoga and whatever weight/endurance work I get from gardening/environmental restoration. I used to push myself so much in running and my...

    For about 3 months now, my work-outs have been solely yoga and whatever weight/endurance work I get from gardening/environmental restoration. I used to push myself so much in running and my body/joints would hurt. Although my body isn't in it's tip-top shape, I'm liking the idea of working out in a healthy way. I really enjoy yoga because I can get stronger *and flexible. I've tried other work-outs and many times it causes my body to stiffen up. Yoga seems to be doing my body a great service. However, I would like to include other forms of work out in my week as I feel it can get me to the next level in yoga/executing some tough positions.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on Surviving the winter in ~life

    beanie
    Link
    Thank you for this post. I have seasonal depression too. It's real. It's so hard for me to focus on anything. All I want to do is keep my eyes closed. I depend a lot more on weed. I am ruining my...

    Thank you for this post.

    "haha yeah I have seasonal depression too,"
    Haha, yeah. I've found that people are really uncomfortable talking about their feelings.

    I have seasonal depression too. It's real. It's so hard for me to focus on anything. All I want to do is keep my eyes closed. I depend a lot more on weed. I am ruining my personal relationships with people because my emotional state is too demanding/hard to cope with. I feel like a horrible person. I feel like the only way to explain it is to imagine that you're fighting for your life: you'd do just about anything to keep yourself alive. Imagine if it's your own brain/psyche you are trying to survive from. Does that make sense? I feel like that doesn't make sense. Yeah, that also happens when I'm depressed, I feel like I can't understand people and they can't understand me. I feel incoherent, incompetent, over-bearing, that I engage in more dangerous activities, that I can't stay awake, that life's has no purpose. I feel lonely, isolated and a pain to love.

    It's horrible.

    These are my go-to's, they slightly work for me sometimes: weed (not the healthiest habit), listen to music/try and find new music, try and exercise/move, reach out to people (that's tough because you don't want to feel like a burden), read, wash dishes/focus on cleaning 1 item (confidence booster so you don't feel useless/that you can't do anything), try a craft project. Some are really hard to do because of the lack of energy.

    I hope my post doesn't come off as "too depressing". I've found that other people find me overwhelming.

    Anyway, thanks for this post again. It helps to vent.

    7 votes
  13. Comment on What have you been listening to this week? in ~music

    beanie
    Link
    I've been diving into Tyler, The Creator. I like his songs "Glitter", "911/Mr. Lonely", "Who Dat Boy" and "I THINK". I've also been listening to Nina Samone's "Be My Husband".

    I've been diving into Tyler, The Creator. I like his songs "Glitter", "911/Mr. Lonely", "Who Dat Boy" and "I THINK".

    I've also been listening to Nina Samone's "Be My Husband".

    2 votes
  14. Comment on Thoughts in ~talk

    beanie
    Link
    Although our experiences with life differ, I think I know how you feel. This feeling that the more I go on, the more cringy moments/bad decisions accumulate. To the point I no longer trust myself...

    Although our experiences with life differ, I think I know how you feel.

    This feeling that the more I go on, the more cringy moments/bad decisions accumulate. To the point I no longer trust myself to make decisions. Sleeping away the consciousness is a form of suicide. So is putting myself in dangerous situations over and over again (hay, if I die by being in a dangerous situation, the suicide's not on me, right?). I cycle between these two extremes, both are distractions. We know our sub-conscious and what we're doing. Maybe hiding something from us that seems so painful to look at. Or maybe just bipolar... idk.

    I don't want to bombard you with advice. What I want and what works for me may not work for you. I think you know what you truly want and/or what's best for you. Sometimes finding that out requires us to stop the bad habits and start listening to ourselves. And that fear that if we stop and listen, it may not have anything to say. That's what makes me run towards those bad habits sometimes. Anything to stop all that noise in my head, it's so loud, yet it says nothing.

    I've noticed for myself that I treat others way better than I treat myself. So I try my best to treat myself how I do another person, a person that I love. I wouldn't feed someone I love horrible foods/drinks, I wouldn't call them the names I call myself, I wouldn't be as critical to them as I am myself, I wouldn't lock them in sleep/put them in dangerous situations if they are going thru a bad time. I'd make them something healthy, maybe a fruit plate, I'd encourage them to do the thing they love: maybe that's going outside, hiking, painting, making music. I'd hug them and be by their side when they are going through a tough time.

    I can bombard you with advice, but I feel like that wouldn't help. Know that you aren't alone. And you aren't a failure or embarrassing to be around or a train wreck or whatever it is you're calling yourself. Maybe you're stuck between being the person you want to be and being the person society wants you to be? Shot in the dark here... maybe projecting.

    Yeah... you seem like a pretty cool person (spunky, tenacity) who's going through a rough time. And you sound fun as shit. Stopping those dangerous things won't make you less fun, trust me.

    10 votes
  15. Comment on If you come from a historically/actively oppressed racial/ethnic group, how has that affected you? in ~talk

    beanie
    Link Parent
    I like the diversity the US has, especially in the major cities. Because of my exposure to people of various races, I have been able to find that, although there are differences, there are so many...

    How do you think growing up in the US has shaped your views on other races?

    I like the diversity the US has, especially in the major cities. Because of my exposure to people of various races, I have been able to find that, although there are differences, there are so many similarities and it's so beautiful to share that experience and learn about all the different cultural norms and rituals.

    Have you ever had to remind yourself not to make assumptions of any other particular type of people in a similar way to how those above might have assumed of you?

    Sigh. I need to do this more often. I avoid making assumptions for minorities very well (or at least I think I do). I try my best to allow an individual tell me their individual views, opinions, likes and dislikes. However, and it has been brought to my attention, that I do not give the same respect to the majority (Caucasians). I recognize that this is true and I am trying my best to stop this. It usually manifests when something goes wrong, it could be something as minor as getting cut in line at the grocery store. I find myself quickly saying "oh, these white ppl". That's not okay and I recognize it's not okay and am actively changing.

    How well represented do you feel your background is in the larger debate about race in America?

    Hmm... I think we're well represented in the larger debate about race in America. However, I do feel that people from my background and culture need to work on having conversations about race and be better at contributing to the debate.

    How do you view the impact of colorism within the Iranian cultural context, if any? For both men and women.

    I can't say there is colorism within the Iranian culture. However, other western beauty standards, like having a small-swoopy nose or 2 eyebrows, have had an impact on both men and women in our culture.

    7 votes
  16. Comment on If you come from a historically/actively oppressed racial/ethnic group, how has that affected you? in ~talk

    beanie
    Link
    I can't say I'm actively oppressed due solely due to my race/ethnic background, but the fact that I'm a minority (or "Other") has affected my life. I'm a Jewish-Iranian female (who has mental...
    • Exemplary

    I can't say I'm actively oppressed due solely due to my race/ethnic background, but the fact that I'm a minority (or "Other") has affected my life.

    I'm a Jewish-Iranian female (who has mental health issues - but that's a different conversation) working in the STEM field.

    Getting "Randomly Checked" at TSA is a normal thing for me that my husband playfully says "Random Check" is my middle name. It's no harm really. So what, I spend an extra couple of minutes at the security line. I think what bothers me most is the fact that the majority *doesn't believe me when I say I'm looked at/treated differently.

    I've been told to my face by more than 1 employer that they were surprised to know that I spoke English well. In one instance, my supervisor stated that when the company was looking at resumes, they were surprised to find that me and my coworker spoke English well. (Side note: my coworker's first/last name is Arabic, my last name is Arabic. Second side note: Iranians speak Farsi, my family just weirdly changed our last name to an Arabic one). I told my supervisor that we both were born, lived and were brought up in the United States, why would we have a problem with English? It could be seen in my cover letter that I'm fluent in English. He avoided the question/ brushed it off with "idk".

    It makes me wonder if their were other opportunities that I wasn't considered for based on my last name. My significant other asked me to try and submit my resume with a different last name (like that one social experiment where the person sent in his resume under different names). I told my significant other that I didn't want to start off a working relationship like that.

    I remember during an interview I asked about there diversity of female engineers in the company (specifically in the engineering/construction department). The interviewer grumbled! And quickly said "50/50!". I did not get a second interview.

    Again, these things are weird. So hard to actually prove. Maybe I didn't get a second interview because I wasn't a strong candidate. That's totally plausible.

    Socially, brownish/beige women aren't really seen as "attractive" by the majority (just look at the "Popular" page on Pornhub - no one looks like me). Or we're seen as "good girls" or "conservative". It affects how people treat me/ invite me (or not invite me) to social gatherings. Or they apologize for cursing in front of me... I curse like a sailor (no offense to sailors), why would I care if you curse? I mean, again, I get it, I need to give the benefit of the doubt. But that's the thing, I feel like I'm giving the benefit of the doubt a lot! And no one really gives me the benefit of the doubt.

    So, yeah, nothing of major consequence from outside the culture.

    Sometimes their are issues within the culture. While I was getting my bachelors degree, I received a lot of backlash from people of my own background as to why I was studying engineering. My best friends father would ask me nearly every time I came over their house what I was studying/pursuing as a career. I repeated "civil/environmental engineering" with a smile every time he asked. The last time he asked, he aggressively responded with "you're so stubborn!".

    When I was nearly done with my bachelors degree, my cousin asked me, "are you sure you don't want to be a nurse?" (Side note: nursing is seen as a more appropriate career choice for a female by my culture).

    I have been ostracized by my culture for my promiscuous tendencies and "liberal"/"western" ideals. I have been ostracized by my culture/family for dating someone outside the culture.

    I've not been allowed freedoms that my brother had while growing up solely because I was a female. I needed to be home by a certain time, I couldn't play sports with the boys, etc. I still did though. Lots and lots of rebellion. But if I put it in perspective, my mom was not allowed to bicycle or swim because she was female. She still doesn't know how to do either. But as a kid, you don't really see big-picture stuff like that.

    Other gender roles in the culture include always having to look a certain way (physically pretty/dressed up - dad and mom have both asked me to get plastic surgery), always washing dishes, serving tea and food while men sit on the couch in the other room, the value of a woman increases when she has a husband to the point that finding a husband is your sole purpose in life, etc.

    I once heard my sister's ex-husband (when they were still married) tell my sister in front of guests that "men are talking" when she tried to give her input/opinion on a subject. I'm glad they divorced. But I'm only happy if my sister is happy, and she seems pretty happy.

    But like I mentioned earlier. It's the fact that people don't believe me when I say I was/am treated differently based on my culture/background. They see it as those specific people/instances were "bad apples" or "bad places". They don't see the issue as systematically embedded in social norms/ mass media/ culture. That's what bothers me most. And I know it affects people from other backgrounds way more than it affects me. And it's even more obvious that the oppression is happening in those instances. And I boil with rage when people don't see it.

    26 votes
  17. Comment on Male dominated fields in ~life

    beanie
    Link Parent
    Thank you. I really needed to hear this and I'm so thankful that their are others out there that understand the struggle. I feel crazy when my male counter-parts don't understand and out-rightly...

    constant criticism has ingrained a fear that she's not smart enough to get any other job in tech and she's stuck there until she can go back to school part time and get a new degree and move into a different industry (she could get a new job easily. She's incredibly smart and talented but won't listen to any of her friends about it. Which I understand, I'm just frustrated she doesn't see what we see in her).

    because lots of tech companies rely on exploitation and not questioning the implications of the things they build and/or how they could be used for wrong reasons.

    "please diversify the economic backgrounds, sexual orientation, gender-identification, racial, and religious make-up of industries and listen to the opinions and experiences of people from those backgrounds because they'll make your company, product, and workforce better".

    Thank you. I really needed to hear this and I'm so thankful that their are others out there that understand the struggle. I feel crazy when my male counter-parts don't understand and out-rightly dismiss how clients or contractors interact with me.

    4 votes
  18. What gets you out of bed?

    Responsibilities can be hard sometimes. Sometimes, we aren't acknowledged for our efforts. What gets you out of bed? What's the narrative you have with yourself as you stare at the ceiling as your...

    Responsibilities can be hard sometimes. Sometimes, we aren't acknowledged for our efforts.

    What gets you out of bed? What's the narrative you have with yourself as you stare at the ceiling as your alarm jingles? On a side note: What your alarm sound? Is it as brutal as a bullhorn? Or do you prefer something calm, like trickling water?

    Related: How do you prefer to be acknowledged at home or compensated at work? Do financial incentives get you going or do you prefer thoughtful gifts or do you look forward speaking with a coworker you get along with?

    I've had 3 "adult" jobs. With each job, I've been getting less and less financial compensation (yeah, I know, I'm going the wrong way!). However, with every job, I'm getting happier/more content. I'm not sure if it's related to the financial compensation or just me learning more about myself. I remember working 24/7 at my highest compensation. I had to have my work phone on me at all times, getting phone calls at any time of day (coworkers) and night (contractors). At my second "adult" job, I found that my interpersonal relationship with my coworker(s) made me happier. I'd get out of bed and say "oh, can't wait to tell 'x' about this dream I had" or a new recipe I tried. It also helped that my second job was something I found important (I was an engineer who worked on reducing energy and water consumption for apartment complexes), and the majority of my coworkers felt the same. The job I'm currently in falls right in line with what I studied in school. I work for a consultant company in the wastewater infrastructure field. I'm happy to even have gotten this opportunity. I see it as very important. However, since I work in the field of poo, many of my coworkers and contractors I work with seem very jaded and only has financial compensation in mind. It's hard to be surrounded by that type of attitude. One coworker mentioned that "it's not like people want to work in sewage" and I said "actually, I studied it in school. I just never was able to get my foot in the door until now and I feel lucky that it happened." Don't get me wrong, the work is hard and there are days one gets exhausted and it ALWAYS stinks. But it's important. It effects the health of people and the environment if it isn't done right. Yeah, I'm rambling. I'm just trying to say I thrive off the attitude of people around me. Interpersonal relationships, for me, are better than financial compensation. Don't get me wrong.. pay me fairly, but I'm not going to be bummed if I don't get a huge raise every year. The pay check doesn't get me to work, the people do.

    25 votes