infpossibilityspace's recent activity

  1. Comment on Looking for advice on replacing my motherboard in ~tech

    infpossibilityspace
    Link Parent
    One thing to look out for when buying SSDs is if it has a "DRAM Cache" (sometimes just called Cache). It's not always mentioned on the product page but good reviews will say. Since the storage...

    One thing to look out for when buying SSDs is if it has a "DRAM Cache" (sometimes just called Cache). It's not always mentioned on the product page but good reviews will say.

    Since the storage itself isn't usually fast enough to keep up with big writes, like downloading a game, the cache is like a fast temporary storage that holds the data until the SSDs catch up.

    The one you've selected doesn't have this. It's still fine day-to-day, but doing big writes or lots of small writes, you'll notice a difference.

    I bought this one which is pretty good.

    Crucial P5 Plus 2TB M.2 PCIe Gen4 NVMe

    1 vote
  2. Comment on Looking for advice on replacing my motherboard in ~tech

    infpossibilityspace
    Link Parent
    Yes, you likely won't notice any difference. Typically these kinds of version changes happen if the internal wiring changes or something like that.

    Yes, you likely won't notice any difference. Typically these kinds of version changes happen if the internal wiring changes or something like that.

    2 votes
  3. Comment on Looking for advice on replacing my motherboard in ~tech

    infpossibilityspace
    Link
    If there's nothing wrong with the speed of your current system, there's nothing wrong with getting another of same motherboard. When you want to upgrade the CPU in a couple of years, look into a...

    If there's nothing wrong with the speed of your current system, there's nothing wrong with getting another of same motherboard. When you want to upgrade the CPU in a couple of years, look into a used 5800X3D.

    Upgrading to the a B550 motherboard isn't worth it unless there's a feature you really want, and upgrading to a B650 would mean getting a new CPU which sounds expensive for your country.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on Song lyrics are getting more repetitive, angrier in ~music

    infpossibilityspace
    Link
    I have a couple of problem with this kind of analysis. Firstly, looking at music from the past 50 years obviously doesn't take into account music from before this time, such as the simplification...

    I have a couple of problem with this kind of analysis. Firstly, looking at music from the past 50 years obviously doesn't take into account music from before this time, such as the simplification going from Baroque to Classical music. Secondly, it doesn't take into account music from outside the mainstream, which naturally tends towards the most common denominator.

    This slightly old but still relevant video from Tantacrul breaks down why these are important. https://youtu.be/VfNdps0daF8

    Repetitive music isn't something that's happening everywhere, just in the most popular stuff. If you're bored of it, check out some independent bands on bandcamp or independent radio stations and you'll quickly find something different.

    I really like James Acaster's Perfect Sounds podcast for this stuff. Go in with an open mind and don't expect to like everything.

    4 votes
  5. Comment on Can noise canceling headphones be effective against non continuous noise such as music? in ~tech

    infpossibilityspace
    Link Parent
    That sounds very frustrating. I've recently had to put up with roadworks at 2am for 3 weeks and there was nothing I could do. I could feel the machines shaking my bed. Fingers crossed you find a...

    That sounds very frustrating. I've recently had to put up with roadworks at 2am for 3 weeks and there was nothing I could do. I could feel the machines shaking my bed.

    Fingers crossed you find a solution!

  6. Comment on Can noise canceling headphones be effective against non continuous noise such as music? in ~tech

    infpossibilityspace
    Link
    Can you share a bit more info? If the noise is late at night and disturbing your sleep, most countries have laws around this and you could ask the police to tell them to stop. As mentioned by...

    Can you share a bit more info?
    If the noise is late at night and disturbing your sleep, most countries have laws around this and you could ask the police to tell them to stop.

    As mentioned by creesch, some people can "hear" the noise cancelling as a pressure or hiss in their ears. I'm one of them so I don't use it - I'd recommend going to an audio shop and trying out a few pairs to make sure this doesn't affect you.

    The best noise cancelling headphones I know are the Sony XM4's, Bose QuietComfort and Apple Airpods Max.

    What ear defenders do you use? 3M Peltors have a rating of 35dB which is about the best you're going to get from passive sets.

  7. Comment on Formula 1 Japanese Grand Prix 2024 - Results in ~sports.motorsports

    infpossibilityspace
    Link Parent
    I'm sure they could be tweaked further but it's already pretty substantial, the 1st placed team has 30% less testing time compared to the team in 7th. At a certain point you have to accept that...

    I'm sure they could be tweaked further but it's already pretty substantial, the 1st placed team has 30% less testing time compared to the team in 7th. At a certain point you have to accept that the lower teams just aren't as efficient with their time and money as the top teams - The Race YT channel had a piece on how Williams only moved away from Excel to track development this winter!

    The difference is scales the further back you go. The team in 10th has 65% more testing time compared to 1st, and lower teams are allowed a higher budget.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on Formula 1 Japanese Grand Prix 2024 - Results in ~sports.motorsports

    infpossibilityspace
    Link Parent
    I think the sliding budget and testing allowance will eventually bring cars closer together, but it'll take time to shake off the residual dominance of the top teams. To some extent, it's not...

    I think the sliding budget and testing allowance will eventually bring cars closer together, but it'll take time to shake off the residual dominance of the top teams.

    To some extent, it's not possible to have truly competitive series like F1 because someone is always going to design a better car, and that progress will last for the rest of that era. They won't be able to make loads of progress with the testing caps, but it's better to have track position than race from the back ;)

    3 votes
  9. Comment on What AI tools are you actually using? in ~tech

    infpossibilityspace
    Link
    I'm not using it at all. AI can't do anything outside of it's training data, so if you're working on something actually original, there's little it can help you with. Also since it doesn't...

    I'm not using it at all. AI can't do anything outside of it's training data, so if you're working on something actually original, there's little it can help you with.

    Also since it doesn't understand reasoning, I don't really trust it for complex answers. There was a hospital who tried to use AI to diagnose TB in patient X-rays - it was more accurate than humans, but they found it was just weighing scans from old machines higher!

    I think it's a good tool to get started or to fill in boring boilerplate stuff, but it's important to know it's limitations and when you might be getting close to them.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on Chechnya 'bans music that is too fast or too slow' in ~music

    infpossibilityspace
    Link
    Suppression of music by authoritarian governments has always been a thing. Around WW2, the composer Shostakovich was threatened and he lost his job for writing music the state disagreed with. Less...

    Suppression of music by authoritarian governments has always been a thing.

    Around WW2, the composer Shostakovich was threatened and he lost his job for writing music the state disagreed with. Less fortunate composers were "disappeared".

    What a ridiculous attempt to force people to behave. I hope it backfires big-time.

    13 votes
  11. Comment on Formula 1 Australian Grand Prix 2024 - Results in ~sports.motorsports

    infpossibilityspace
    Link Parent
    You say they are big, but honestly, they are huge compared to even 20 years ago. This image shows a striking comparison:...

    You say they are big, but honestly, they are huge compared to even 20 years ago. This image shows a striking comparison:

    https://preview.redd.it/fq7ifeizzpu81.jpg?width=1080&crop=smart&auto=webp&s=f93b07511ca32842adc843ea47c0d30bf2f20d17

    Obviously part of the increase can be attributed to safety features and the hybrid drivetrain, but I don't think that's the whole story. Engines are so much smaller compared to the V12 and V10 eras, so that saves some space, and many safety improvements like the halo don't require additional length compared to the 2010s.

    I honestly think we could go back to the 2000 length + 1990 width cars with modern safety features and drivetrains, and get an instant win for raceability. Just compare footage from Monaco's Rascasse in the 90s and today, it's ridiculous.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on An opinion on current technological trends in ~tech

    infpossibilityspace
    Link
    Cynically, it's more profitable for companies if people don't (want to) care how things work for themselves. Forcing a kind of learned helplessness with "oops" error messages and no actual...

    Cynically, it's more profitable for companies if people don't (want to) care how things work for themselves. Forcing a kind of learned helplessness with "oops" error messages and no actual cause/steps to take encourages people to take things back to the shop for help.

    They can sell you support, or better yet, a subscription to a service they promise will keep working... So long as you don't mind not owning anything you save there and it mines your behaviour to sell to the highest bidder.

    It's the same reason companies are fighting right-to-repair so hard. If they make something durable that you can fix something yourself, how are they going to keep making more and more money off you? So they implement DRM and stop trains running if they get repaired by an independent shop (this was a real story).

    It's an increasingly fragile situation. For example, big game engines like Unity got started because they were able to hire people who knew how to make their own game engines. Now they're successful and fewer people are writing game engines, where are places like Unity going to hire the next generation of engine programmers from? Now extrapolate that to every industry.

    I don't know what the solution is, except to simplify in a more productive way, like replacing generic software libraries with bespoke code that's faster/easier to debug, or reducing the amount of software we use, like an IoT fridge that's a just security vulnerability with a 5 year timer.

    3 votes
  13. Comment on European crash tester says carmakers must bring back physical controls. In 2026, Euro NCAP points will be deducted if some controls aren't physical. in ~transport

    infpossibilityspace
    Link
    I'm a huge fan of physical controls. Chosen well and laid out sensibly, they are faster and safer than digital. You can develop a muscle-memory for where things are, to the point you might not...

    I'm a huge fan of physical controls. Chosen well and laid out sensibly, they are faster and safer than digital. You can develop a muscle-memory for where things are, to the point you might not even need to look to change something.

    Digital can be good too, it's endlessly flexible and can display a lot more information, but it's not a cure-all and we need to remember we are fundamentally physical animals. Plus less software means fewer bugs and software updates.

    They mention a few things like indicators and lights, but I would add heating controls to that list too. I don't want to search for the demister if my windscreen fogs up or if I'm feeling a bit chilly. Recent Mercedes' have separated this into a separate bar under the touchscreen, which is a decent compromise.

    15 votes
  14. Comment on UK requesting comments for updating ebike power laws in ~transport

    infpossibilityspace
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    The proposal doesn't change the current speed limit. Plus you have the complication that exceeding 15.5mph is only a violation if you are being assisted above that speed. It's perfectly legal to...

    The proposal doesn't change the current speed limit.

    Plus you have the complication that exceeding 15.5mph is only a violation if you are being assisted above that speed. It's perfectly legal to go faster with just your legs.

    5 votes
  15. Comment on UK requesting comments for updating ebike power laws in ~transport

    infpossibilityspace
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    It's certainly better than nothing, most adults would struggle to produce 250W with their legs, but there are some hilly areas where even 250W isn't enough to be useful. This is a surprisingly...

    It's certainly better than nothing, most adults would struggle to produce 250W with their legs, but there are some hilly areas where even 250W isn't enough to be useful.

    This is a surprisingly difficult question to answer and gets to the heart of why I didn't want to talk about the "rated wattage" of a motor. Most common ebike motors today (bosch, yamaha etc.) will output more than 250W and still be considered legal. Rated power is a fundamentally flawed concept. I'd recommend reading this article to understand why:

    https://ebikes.ca/learn/power-ratings.html

    6 votes
  16. Comment on White House urges use of type safe and memory safe programming languages and hardware in ~tech

    infpossibilityspace
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I'd suggest watching the Casey Muratori talk I linked, the evidence he provides directly contradicts your statements that it doesn't apply or isn't worth it. Can you provide proof of your claim?...

    You'll always see things like C/C++/Assembly in the top of the line performance areas (military especially) but the vast majority of applications gain nothing but potentially massive weaknesses and slower development from using them.

    I'd suggest watching the Casey Muratori talk I linked, the evidence he provides directly contradicts your statements that it doesn't apply or isn't worth it. Can you provide proof of your claim?

    But the real meat of the discussion always boils down to "do you need a few extra ms, or hell even seconds or minutes, or do you need to prevent some memory unsafe error that will compromise EVERYTHING".

    What makes this an either/or choice? A good software engineer with intimate knowledge of what the computer is actually doing in response to their code will produce software that is both fast and secure.

    I'll refer back to my other comment where I referenced John Carmack (another great programmer who writes fast code whose advice you should take seriously) - "Most bugs are a result of the execution state not being exactly what you think it is."

    http://number-none.com/blow/john_carmack_on_inlined_code.html

    2 votes
  17. Comment on UK requesting comments for updating ebike power laws in ~transport

    infpossibilityspace
    (edited )
    Link
    My executive summary: In my opinion this is a good idea - one could climb steeper hills for longer (Bristol, Bradford), or load up a cargo bike with more stuff, and generally increases the...

    My executive summary:

    Current law is that motors are limited to a maximum rated wattage of 250W, motor assist must cut off at 15.5mph/25kph, and throttles are limited to 4mph/6kph/walking pace.

    Proposed law increases the maximum rated wattage to 500W, and allows throttles to be used up to the existing and unchanging 15.5mph assist limit.

    In my opinion this is a good idea - one could climb steeper hills for longer (Bristol, Bradford), or load up a cargo bike with more stuff, and generally increases the viability of ebikes (technically pedelecs or EAPCs) as a car/bus alternative.

    I've seen some discussion on other forums that this will decrease pedestrian safety, which I disagree with. Having more power doesn't fundamentally affect how people behave - bad cyclists will always be bad and we have existing laws to combat that. People should take responsibility for their actions rather than blaming the tools, but I'm curious if I've overlooked something.

    Do you agree with the proposal? Will this decrease road safety too much?

    Note: This is not a discussion about the merits/drawbacks of "rated wattage" as a means of deciding legislation. Nor battery safety or DIY legality. There is no scope in the proposal to change these.

    11 votes
  18. Comment on White House urges use of type safe and memory safe programming languages and hardware in ~tech

    infpossibilityspace
    Link Parent
    I disagree that most programmers don't need to worry about the performance of their code. Computers are faster than they have ever been, true, but software is also as slow and unreliable as it has...

    I disagree that most programmers don't need to worry about the performance of their code. Computers are faster than they have ever been, true, but software is also as slow and unreliable as it has ever been.

    Casey Muratori has a great talk about why performance is relevant to the average programmer - his background is game engine architecture but he shows that other industries spend a lot of time and money chasing performance for business reasons. https://youtu.be/x2EOOJg8FkA

    Jon Blow has an interesting talk about how slow/buggy modern software has become and why it's a problem. He's a game designer/programmer but similar to Casey, he discusses how it impacts the broader software industry. https://youtu.be/ZSRHeXYDLko

    12 votes
  19. Comment on Can European carmakers stop China’s electric behemoth BYD? in ~transport

    infpossibilityspace
    Link
    BYD started as a battery company first, then branched into EVs later. Considering that batteries are the biggest cost of an EV, BYD has a fundamental advantage of being vertically integrated. I'm...

    BYD started as a battery company first, then branched into EVs later. Considering that batteries are the biggest cost of an EV, BYD has a fundamental advantage of being vertically integrated. I'm not aware of any EU car maker which can boast that.

    Worth noting, however, that the EU is currently investigating Chinese EV makers for uncompetitive practices thanks to government subsidies. It is still ongoing as far as I know, but I can imagine some very harsh import taxes being applied if they find fault.

    Also, while Chinese EVs absolutely have a price advantage, I'm hesitant about the long-term reliability of them when it comes to buying parts. I have faith that the European marques will still be around and producing parts for 5-10 year old cars. Maybe China's brands will too, but that question mark is powerful.

    11 votes