onyxleopard's recent activity

  1. Comment on youtube-dl's GitHub repository has become inaccessible due to a DMCA takedown from RIAA in ~tech

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    In fact, it looks like the repo that hosts DMCA takedown notices that GitHub has received now includes the source of youtube-dl. How this happened is explained on Reddit here and the thread around...

    In fact, it looks like the repo that hosts DMCA takedown notices that GitHub has received now includes the source of youtube-dl. How this happened is explained on Reddit here and the thread around this (along with precedence for this sort of "abuse" of PRs) is interesting.

    I wonder if GitHub will change the way that PRs are handled in light of this? From version control and data integrity standpoint, it makes total sense. From a legal perspective, it seems like it opens up a lot of liability. Fundamentally, I’m not sure how these conflicting perspectives can be reconciled.

    8 votes
  2. Comment on youtube-dl's GitHub repository has become inaccessible due to a DMCA takedown from RIAA in ~tech

    onyxleopard
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    How is it that any of the claims being levied against youtube-dl are not also levied against YouTube itself or any other software that uses YouTube’s APIs? Is there a legal distinction here, or is...

    How is it that any of the claims being levied against youtube-dl are not also levied against YouTube itself or any other software that uses YouTube’s APIs? Is there a legal distinction here, or is this just the RIAA being scummy and picking and choosing whom to go after?

    12 votes
  3. Comment on Epic S&P 500 rally is powered by assets you can’t see or touch in ~finance

    onyxleopard
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    I really hate it when writers are willing to bother to include detracting opinions from their thesis without actually addressing them. I appreciate the intent to appear balanced, but if you just...

    “I got a Ph.D in finance, not accounting, but I would say I’m not sure if I agree,” said Linda Zhang, CEO and founder of Purview Investments and senior adviser to Social Finance Inc. “Market cap is an indication of willingness to pay for future earnings. Part of that difference could reflect how much both tangible and intangible assets can generate in earnings in the future. I don’t think the difference is just intangible.”

    I really hate it when writers are willing to bother to include detracting opinions from their thesis without actually addressing them. I appreciate the intent to appear balanced, but if you just leave a quote like this hanging there and don’t bother to address it, how can I come away from your piece more informed and less confused than when I started? If you have a thesis, defend it. If you can’t defend it, then you need to reconsider your thesis. If you’re going to pull in quotes to poke holes in your thesis, you need to address them. If you’re going to write a piece about intangible assets, then go right out and admit there is no consensus on the definition of this term, how can a reader glean anything at all from the piece?

    While even experts differ on what constitutes an intangible asset, and some view Lev’s definitions as loose, expansion in the value of things like Facebook Inc.’s advertising platform, Netflix Inc.’s customer algorithms and Amazon.com Inc.’s user networks is attracting attention now if for no other reason than it explains a mystery of the pandemic era: the stock market’s uncanny resilience.

    There was a recent post posted here about the issues with conflating the S&P or other indices with the market itself. Saying that the market is resilient because you are only looking at those companies that are doing well is cyclical.

    “But if you think about tangible assets, physical assets, they are not scalable,” Lev said. “You can use a seat in an airplane only once or twice a day. You cannot sell the same seat 5,000 times a day.”

    That’s true, but if you have 5,000x the demand for that seat, you can raise the price on that seat. "Intangible" things like licenses for software seats, unlike tangible assets, have no scarcity to drive up prices when demand increases. Isn’t this very basic econ 101 theory about elastic vs. inelastic supply/demand? I’ve never studied economics formally, and even I can see the giant hole in this argument.

    A product whose value is derived entirely from a formula, like a drug or software, can be sold millions of times with minimal additional investment.

    That’s true, but drugs increasingly require enormous R&D efforts to bring to market, and are increasingly risky as the pharmaceutical space becomes more crowded. Software, on the other hand, may sell many licenses in a short period, but if you want continued sales, it requires a significant investment in maintenance and operational costs to continue to develop, test, and deploy on an ongoing basis, not to mention evolve based on competitive pressure.

    3 votes
  4. Comment on Streaming app Quibi is shutting down, after raising $1.75 billion and launching six months ago in ~tech

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    That’s one of the reasons they failed, though. Not having a way for people to watch on their tv on day one is just totally out of touch. It doesn’t matter that people watch things on their...

    What a bummer that they finished that off then shut down.

    That’s one of the reasons they failed, though. Not having a way for people to watch on their tv on day one is just totally out of touch. It doesn’t matter that people watch things on their phones—watching serial video on your TV is table stakes.

    15 votes
  5. Comment on I hate generational hate in ~life

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    I don’t know in terms of ethics what the proportion should be. I was asking what your reasoning is as you seem to have a conclusion on this. The current trend is for younger generations to have...

    Shouldn't they have proportionally less, but an equivalent or greater amount absolutely?

    I don’t know in terms of ethics what the proportion should be. I was asking what your reasoning is as you seem to have a conclusion on this.

    The current trend is for younger generations to have lower earnings and accumulated wealth over their lifetimes, proportionally than preceding generations. In fact it seems, like at current trends, future generations are going to have negative wealth (i.e. debt). I think that’s not a sustainable or desirable outcome, so I’m trying to grok where you’re coming from.

    3 votes
  6. Comment on I hate generational hate in ~life

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    If there is more absolute stuff of worth today, why should the proportions be skewed to older people? If current trends continue, future generations will own nothing of value in absolute terms.

    If there is more absolute stuff of worth today, why should the proportions be skewed to older people? If current trends continue, future generations will own nothing of value in absolute terms.

    9 votes
  7. Comment on The fake futurism of Elon Musk in ~tech

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    The Gibson quote is pretty solid, but the thing that I think it belies is that one may assume, over time, what is futuristic now will become evenly distributed. This is only true if the rate of...

    "The future is already here – it's just not evenly distributed."

    The Gibson quote is pretty solid, but the thing that I think it belies is that one may assume, over time, what is futuristic now will become evenly distributed. This is only true if the rate of technology development and the rate of commodification of such technology are at a ratio between 0 and 1. If the rate of tech dev outpaces the rate at which it finds its way into everyday consumers’ hands, and the right tech comes along that continues to accelerate and increase that ratio, then it may be that some tech never makes its way to "even distribution". Biological immortality, arcologies, generation ships etc. are all technologies that could essentially totally separate certain economic strata from the rest of humanity—if you can’t afford a ticket on the ship/a spot in the arc/the nanobot injection then you’re stuck dying like the other plebs.

    8 votes
  8. Comment on I hate generational hate in ~life

    onyxleopard
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    Ultimate attributional error is worth thinking about. I don’t like the way this is framed, though, because the question asked is if generations can be held responsible for the future. Who is...

    Can entire generations actually be in charge and held responsible of the future? Or is this idea an ultimate attribution error, where we ascribe the actions of few powerful ones to a wider (and much less powerful) group?

    Ultimate attributional error is worth thinking about. I don’t like the way this is framed, though, because the question asked is if generations can be held responsible for the future. Who is responsible for the present? If we concede that any subsets of living humans do bear responsibility, then it logically follows it must be the older generations. Nobody is about to make the illogical leap that those who are not old enough to affect social or economic policy could be the ones responsible. That is, the arrow of time and our basic understanding of causality precludes, say, those born outside of some sliding window of time from having been capable of affecting certain changes through policy or collective action. Now, of the subsets of those born at the appropriate times for blame to be a possibility, one still has to consider whether laying that blame makes sense—and I think that’s where the ultimate attribution errors come into focus.

    But, there is another issue worth separating. I think a lot of antipathy from younger people towards their elders in the present stems from a sense that while it’s likely true that a very small section of boomers truly had a hand in the decisions that affected the present status quo, the consensus is that a disproportionate number of boomers are not sympathetic to the issues that subsequent generations are facing. That generalized lack of sympathy is abrasive, and can be misinterpreted by boomers as millennials or gen z blaming them, when the blame brush isn’t really being applied. That is, younger folks might be more endeared to their elders if their elders spent at least a little effort trying to appreciate the issues that are currently at hand, even if they didn’t directly or intentionally have a hand in them.

    9 votes
  9. Comment on Addressing topic areas that chronically engender "low quality" discussion in ~tildes

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    I am aware of the nuances and ambiguities of the term conflict. I’m still of the opinion that civil discourse is more easily achieved by avoiding conflict, even if there are opportunities for...

    I am aware of the nuances and ambiguities of the term conflict. I’m still of the opinion that civil discourse is more easily achieved by avoiding conflict, even if there are opportunities for productive conflict that are passed over. It’s too fine a line for most to walk most of the time. I guess it’s just simply a risk/reward thing and I know where I stand on that after observing enough online discourse to see how things go.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on Addressing topic areas that chronically engender "low quality" discussion in ~tildes

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    If the disengagement is occurring at the appropriate time, it preempts discussions going badly. Personally, I’d prefer chilling speech and participation on particular topics for which discussion...

    I don't see people feeling the need to disengage as a positive sign. I see it as a sign that discussion goes so badly, or the people involved are so unable to engage graciously, that it's chilling speech and participation.

    If the disengagement is occurring at the appropriate time, it preempts discussions going badly. Personally, I’d prefer chilling speech and participation on particular topics for which discussion consistently devolves.

    Which side of it you come down on (are the interactions bad? or are the people too thin-skinned?) depends on whether it's solvable or not but neither of them point to the situation being "good" or the people being "mature."

    I guess we just fundamentally disagree on our value judgments as far as online interactions go. I place a good value judgment on a lack of uncivilized discussion. I would even go so far as to prefer that people simply avoid discussions that they know they are likely to only end up enflaming. Self-discipline in this regard reduces the work of moderators even at the risk of reducing engagement in certain topics. I think that’s a trade-off worth making. Otherwise, you end up with the now classic Reddit-style posts with dozens of threads remove by moderators where you know there was tons of heated flaming going on and it all could have been avoided if people decided not to comment in the first place.

    1 vote
  11. Comment on Addressing topic areas that chronically engender "low quality" discussion in ~tildes

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    Partly yes. The idea is to avoid unnecessary conflict by simply stepping away from the conversation entirely. While this isn’t always possible in person, online it is trivial. Plenty of people can...

    It’s sounding like your argument is that the ideal resolution to conflict is to simply not have conflict, which kind of renders the idea of a discussion moot.

    Partly yes. The idea is to avoid unnecessary conflict by simply stepping away from the conversation entirely. While this isn’t always possible in person, online it is trivial.

    If you can’t discuss a charged topic at all, then how can one say high quality discussion is happening?

    Plenty of people can discuss charged topics like adults. Plenty of adults also know when they should stop engaging.

    What you’re saying doesn’t really address what I’m talking about, which is cases where the discussion does go south.

    In the event that a discussion does devolve, that’s when moderators have to step in. If people preemptively disengage when they realize they can no longer contribute constructively, this prevents the discussion from going south, thus lowering the burden on moderators.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on Addressing topic areas that chronically engender "low quality" discussion in ~tildes

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    Disengagement is a mature way of resolving a conflict, not a symptom. Disengagement should happen before deterioration of the discourse. You can’t see the direct evidence of appropriate...

    Disengagement is a mature way of resolving a conflict, not a symptom. Disengagement should happen before deterioration of the discourse. You can’t see the direct evidence of appropriate disengagement you aren’t involved in because it is manifest in an absence of discourse that doesn’t go well.

    3 votes
  13. Comment on Addressing topic areas that chronically engender "low quality" discussion in ~tildes

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    I hadn’t heard that, and I think that’s unfortunate. You can’t necessarily know, before you get into a thread, whether it’s something you’ll want to continue to engage with, so it seems a little...

    I hadn’t heard that, and I think that’s unfortunate. You can’t necessarily know, before you get into a thread, whether it’s something you’ll want to continue to engage with, so it seems a little unreasonable. That said, it would likely also be detrimental if a majority of people on the site contribute only by popping into the threads to leave a single comment and never reply or follow-up.

    9 votes
  14. Comment on Addressing topic areas that chronically engender "low quality" discussion in ~tildes

    onyxleopard
    Link
    It feels like you’re trying to design around users’ proclivity to disengage with the site in certain situations as if disengagement is an inherent problem. I don’t think any design is necessary...

    It feels like you’re trying to design around users’ proclivity to disengage with the site in certain situations as if disengagement is an inherent problem. I don’t think any design is necessary here. Disengagement is a healthy solution for avoiding online conflict. It’s part of the beauty of asynchronous online communication. You don’t have to remain engaged. You can get up and go do something—anything—else. People spend oodles of time figuring out how to exploit human psychology in order to increase engagement on ad-driven social media. But I really just don’t think there’s any motivation for that here. People will engage with content if they want to. If they don’t, why is it important to try to influence their behavior to engage with topics they would rather not?

    15 votes
  15. Comment on What are some songs/albums that strongly benefit from their "outside story"? in ~music

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    Also, the Wikipedia rabbit hole of "answer songs" appeared and I entered.

    Also, the Wikipedia rabbit hole of "answer songs" appeared and I entered.

    4 votes
  16. Comment on A GPT-3 bot was posting on /r/AskReddit for a week and routinely getting upvoted and replied to in ~tech

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    FYI, AI Dungeon is exposing a particular instance of a language model that uses the pre-trained GPT-3. Others are and will continue to create different fine-tuned models that will perform...

    FYI, AI Dungeon is exposing a particular instance of a language model that uses the pre-trained GPT-3. Others are and will continue to create different fine-tuned models that will perform differently from the particular models that are accessible through AI Dungeon. Claiming that all fine-tuned models built on GPT-3 are recognizable is dubious without evidence.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on What are some songs/albums that strongly benefit from their "outside story"? in ~music

    onyxleopard
    (edited )
    Link
    The Joy Division song "Love Will Tear Us Apart" has two contexts that stand out to me: 1: 2: Edit: My favorite cover of this song is this one.

    The Joy Division song "Love Will Tear Us Apart" has two contexts that stand out to me:

    1:

    "Love Will Tear Us Apart" is a song by English rock band Joy Division, released in June 1980 as a non-album single. Its lyrics were inspired by lead singer Ian Curtis' marital problems and struggles with mental illness.[6] The single was released the month after Curtis' suicide.

    2:

    In 1980 Joy Division released Love Will Tear Us Apart, an answer song[22] to "Love Will Keep Us Together".

    Edit: My favorite cover of this song is this one.

    5 votes
  18. Comment on Nvidia replaced video codecs with a neural network in ~tech

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    Yeah, at work lately we’ve had video calls with dozens of people for all-hands meetings. This may be cool tech for capturing keyframes, but I think newer video codecs like AV1 etc. are the real,...

    Yeah, at work lately we’ve had video calls with dozens of people for all-hands meetings. This may be cool tech for capturing keyframes, but I think newer video codecs like AV1 etc. are the real, practical solution for improving quality with lower bandwidth once they are more widely available and have hardware support.

    4 votes
  19. Comment on How can we change the site's structure/mechanics/patterns so that we're not discouraging posting "too much" on particular subjects? in ~tildes.official

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    Isn’t this what Reddit tried with multi-subreddits? This was only from a users’ perspective, but you could essentially share your set of subreddits with others so they could subscribe to the...

    When people fragmented like that, they were really trying to specialize their subscriptions - and that's a feature I've never seen tried in a link aggregator before.

    Isn’t this what Reddit tried with multi-subreddits? This was only from a users’ perspective, but you could essentially share your set of subreddits with others so they could subscribe to the multi-subreddit you designed. AFAICT, on tildes this would basically just be offering users a way to find special combinations of groups.

    I think the general problem with trying to divide anything up into strictly non-overlapping categories is the problem of ontology engineering and I think it ultimately is infeasible to solve in a way that would please everyone. Rather than divide the Tildes user population up into more granular subgroups, multi-groups may be a nice way to bring different communities together. The issue becomes, how do you provide access to multi-groups in a way that doesn’t fragment things? How can new users find good multi-groups? Is this something @deimos would have to curate? Could the same multi-group customization be extended to customizing meta-groups by tagged content (this would make reliance on non-fragmented and high quality tagging more important)? Is there a channel in which users could submit customized multi-groups/tag queries and users could see the submissions and maybe vote on them (maybe on ~tildes?)?

    I think organizing large communities is just a fundamentally hard problem and I don’t know if I have any particularly great insight to contribute, but I sort of wish there was a way to take advantage of individual submission tags in a way to aggregate content in a more natural way than a fixed hierarchy of groups that users decide they want to be a part of or not.

    3 votes
  20. Comment on Automatically change incorrect ()[] Markdown syntax to the correct []() form for links in ~tildes

    onyxleopard
    Link Parent
    I think breaking whatever flavor of Markdown spec that has been adopted is generally a bad idea. If users are entering Markdown source, they should be expected to enter syntactically correct...

    I think breaking whatever flavor of Markdown spec that has been adopted is generally a bad idea. If users are entering Markdown source, they should be expected to enter syntactically correct Markdown. The case of user and group mentions is not a native Markdown feature, but it’s also not intended to fix a mistaken input, so I can see the argument for it. I don’t think it’s too much to ask of users to enter correct Markdown, given there is a preview option and formatting help buttons above every comment input field, so you can easily tell if your comment source is correct before posting, and you can teach yourself the correct syntax when you get it wrong. However, if you deem it that users shouldn’t be expected to enter correct Markdown source, then I believe the correct course of action is to implement a WYSIWYG comment editor.

    10 votes