7 votes

The Few Remaining Uses of the Word “Macintosh”

5 comments

  1. [4]
    stu2b50
    Link
    I get that the article's point is more "hey, here's a cool anachronistic thing" but the tone towards the end was just bizarrely urgent ...ok I mean, tbh, nothing? This is such a non-issue lmao

    I get that the article's point is more "hey, here's a cool anachronistic thing" but the tone towards the end was just bizarrely urgent

    What’s most curious about this vestigial naming is that everything about it is wrong. Besides the anachronistic use of “Macintosh,” the “HD” abbreviation for “hard disk” or “hard drive” refers to a spinning disk drive, whereas most Macs rely on SSDs (solid-state drives). Even the case-less hard drive icon in the Quick Look preview window incorrectly uses an image of a spinning disk to represent an SSD.

    ...ok

    So what should Apple do?

    I mean, tbh, nothing? This is such a non-issue lmao

    7 votes
    1. Keegan
      Link Parent
      I agree with you on this. It's just like how Microsoft Office uses a floppy disk for the save button. It's what people will recognize. If it is changed, the benefit of it being contextually...

      I agree with you on this. It's just like how Microsoft Office uses a floppy disk for the save button. It's what people will recognize. If it is changed, the benefit of it being contextually accurate doesn't outweigh the people who will no longer get what's happening.

      4 votes
    2. [2]
      emdash
      Link Parent
      Well, that's how a lot of Apple critics—and when I say critics, I mean users, who appreciate the design aesthetic, and even the lingual aesthetic—of a consistent platform operate. Your non-issue...

      Well, that's how a lot of Apple critics—and when I say critics, I mean users, who appreciate the design aesthetic, and even the lingual aesthetic—of a consistent platform operate. Your non-issue is someone else's nitpick, because they care about sweating the small stuff. In fact, many long-time Apple employees and users still to this day will tell you "it's the little things" that matter.

      If you don't care, you don't care—that's fine. Just like how someone looking at a painting probably won't entirely appreciate the brushstrokes and subtleties unless they're a connoisseur. But don't tell other people what is important to them and what isn't.

      1. sky_Pharaoh
        Link Parent
        I normally would agree with you, but in this context i've literally never seen anyone complain about Apple dropping the "Macintosh" moniker, not even hardcore enthusiasts.

        I normally would agree with you, but in this context i've literally never seen anyone complain about Apple dropping the "Macintosh" moniker, not even hardcore enthusiasts.

        3 votes
  2. aphoenix
    Link
    To answer the question posed in the article: my drive is also named "Macintosh HD". It's an interesting article; I hadn't actually consider how Apple had mostly scrubbed "Macintosh" from their...

    To answer the question posed in the article: my drive is also named "Macintosh HD".

    It's an interesting article; I hadn't actually consider how Apple had mostly scrubbed "Macintosh" from their lexicon. It's a funny choice, considering how ingrained "Macintosh" was to us 20 or 30 years ago... but it has clearly worked for them.

    4 votes