8 votes

Welcome to RWX.GG

14 comments

  1. [2]
    Apos
    Link
    I've been following rwxrob for a few weeks. He streams on Twitch. An idea that I'm really liking is Knowledge as Source. His site is built in markdown. An example page:...

    I've been following rwxrob for a few weeks. He streams on Twitch.

    An idea that I'm really liking is Knowledge as Source.

    His site is built in markdown. An example page: https://gitlab.com/rwx.gg/README/-/blob/master/what/knowledge/README.md

    He uses Pandoc to plug the markdown into an html template. (With Pandoc, he can also convert the markdown into any other file format. It could be converted to an ebook or anything else he could possibly want.)

    His build script goes through each directory recursively for example the knowledge directory: https://gitlab.com/rwx.gg/README/-/tree/master/what/knowledge. It takes the README.md and generates the corresponding html file as index.html.

    On his site, he deploys the markdown alongside the html: https://rwx.gg/what/knowledge/README.md.

    This whole process makes for a very simple and easy to maintain static site generator.

    2 votes
  2. [12]
    Moonchild
    Link
    Have to disagree on this one. YAML is very easy to read, but I've always had difficulty writing it. JSON, on the other hand, is simple and regular. Also harnesses existing knowledge of js or...

    JSON ... Human-readable structured data language

    YAML ... Human-writable JSON-compatible structured data language

    Have to disagree on this one. YAML is very easy to read, but I've always had difficulty writing it. JSON, on the other hand, is simple and regular. Also harnesses existing knowledge of js or python (admittedly not applicable to a beginner programmer, but).


    I'm confused as to why they teach go. And why they call it 'functional' (rust is obviously more functional, but even bash has better support for first-class functions than go).


    Rust ... Fastest safe low-level language

    Nope, nope, nope, nope, nope.


    He hints at it in the video, but I can't find much other information. (Actually, this question might be better targeted at their community, but.) Has anyone had luck getting a job in tech w/o a degree? What did you do? I have a reasonably rich portfolio, but haven't gotten any calls back.

    1 vote
    1. [3]
      Apos
      Link Parent
      I agree with most of your post, though I've seen people bring those same points during his live stream and I found his responses and where he is coming from reasonable. To answer your last...

      I agree with most of your post, though I've seen people bring those same points during his live stream and I found his responses and where he is coming from reasonable.


      To answer your last question, I've landed a job in tech without a degree. The real trick is networking. I knew a guy who knew people at the company. He gave me a heads up when the company hosted a BBQ at their offices. I got to go there, talk with people. Brought my CV and gave it to the right person by the end of the evening. We got to talk informally and I spoke about my current projects. They gave me an interview on the next week. That gave me time to research the company, read their whole site, articles, etc. First was a screening interview by phone, then a couple interviews in person. I aced the interviews. It took 3 weeks before I got hired.

      Backtracking a bit, someone else I met during the same BBQ had also applied previously, his interview was before me. He had a degree. I later asked why he didn't get hired, it was because he didn't seem motivated. Not enough passion.

      A few months later, I learned that they weren't even hiring during that time period. They pretty much created the spot after talking during the BBQ. During the next 3 weeks, I got pushed in the fast track. I gave them a really good first impression.

      In all that, I did highlight that I didn't have a degree. During one interview with the CEO I got challenged on that, and they were interested to hear about who I was, where I was coming from etc.

      Anyway, I think the main point is that getting hired is more about the human aspect. Get a good CV, but try your best to reach out.

      2 votes
      1. [2]
        Moonchild
        Link Parent
        Hmmm. Networking isn't exactly my strong suite. Have any suggestions for what I can do, especially in a time when BBQs are strictly prohibited? Is it a good idea to cold-call/email people? I do...

        The real trick is networking

        Hmmm. Networking isn't exactly my strong suite. Have any suggestions for what I can do, especially in a time when BBQs are strictly prohibited? Is it a good idea to cold-call/email people?

        I do know a couple of people who are relatively high up in successful tech companies, but they're all in a different country, so not much help.

        2 votes
        1. Apos
          Link Parent
          I'm gonna try to write something useful, wish me luck. There was a job offer (now closed) that was interesting the other day, the way it's written is quite inspiring:...

          I'm gonna try to write something useful, wish me luck.

          There was a job offer (now closed) that was interesting the other day, the way it's written is quite inspiring: https://jobs.tailwindui.com/full-stack-developer. Anyway that's not 100% relevant to this conversation probably, but there are most likely thousands of other online opportunities right now.

          Networking is just a fancy word for having fun and being interested in other people and their projects. You talk to person A take mental notes for what they are good at and sometimes life happens, you talk to a person B and you realize that A and B could be interested in knowing each others. You hook them up and it grows their network. As you build a network, other people will also do that for you. Do your best to hang out with those that have similar life goals. That's good for motivation.

          Something that I like to do is build neat projects on GitHub. Some projects I put out there and they blow up (one project ended up with 3 million users at some point though now it's dead). I got contacted about that quite often even 5+ years later.

          At some point I started a stream and people would constantly blow my mind with things I never thought about. I got invited into The Knowledge Fellowship which was pretty cool. Their Discord is really awesome.

          BTW, the tailwind community seems to have a bunch of job postings regularly if you want to do webdev: https://discord.gg/zNXHHEv.

          There are also some big companies in the industry posting jobs here: https://discord.gg/XRvhd2C.

          There are so many active communities on Discord, it's a good place to start looking. Though before you apply everywhere, I'd suggest taking 1 or 2 weeks just reading hundreds of postings to build an intuition for what to expect. Look at other dev's profiles and read what they write about themselves on their sites or social network profiles. Or even go on sites like Artstation and randomly read what artists are writing in their about page. You'll see some high quality descriptions and some low quality ones. Building a network is also about knowing your way around where to find resources, building an expertise and being the person that people want to work with.

          Hope this wasn't too abstract.

          1 vote
    2. [3]
      ThatFanficGuy
      Link Parent
      I want to know what you use to write it.

      JSON, on the other hand, is simple and regular.

      I want to know what you use to write it.

      1 vote
      1. [2]
        Moonchild
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        Just a plain syntax highlighting texteditor (vim, but for json I could as easily use any other). JSON is so simple that crockford famously printed out its grammar on business card. It only has 7...

        Just a plain syntax highlighting texteditor (vim, but for json I could as easily use any other).

        JSON is so simple that crockford famously printed out its grammar on business card. It only has 7 basic types. Yes, there are edge cases, but it's simple enough that I've never had trouble creating a structure I need. YAML, on the other hand...

        This is the yaml spec. The pdf version is 84 pages, while json's rests comfortably on two. Yes, it has examples and rationales and IETF terminology definitions, but it's still much more complex. Actually, it's a superset of json. When I find myself needing to make anything beyond the completely trivial (lists of atoms or string-keyed atoms) in yaml, I usually just write it in json.

        1 vote
        1. ThatFanficGuy
          Link Parent
          I once read that no sane human being should ever work with raw JSON. Having written it plenty by hand in the last year, I agree with them wholeheartedly. It's a simple data model that is not easy...

          Just a plain syntax highlighting texteditor (vim, but for json I could as easily use any other).

          I once read that no sane human being should ever work with raw JSON.

          Having written it plenty by hand in the last year, I agree with them wholeheartedly.

          It's a simple data model that is not easy to write by hand.

          3 votes
    3. Apos
      Link Parent
      JSON is okay only when it's properly indented. Most of the JSON you'll receive from various APIs will be minimized which makes it really hard to read or work with for humans. This is what he...

      JSON is okay only when it's properly indented. Most of the JSON you'll receive from various APIs will be minimized which makes it really hard to read or work with for humans.

      This is what he writes for JSON: https://rwx.gg/lang/data/json/, and YAML: https://rwx.gg/lang/data/yaml/.

      1 vote
    4. [4]
      hungariantoast
      Link Parent
      You can also add Zig to that list, considering that Zig produces faster machine code than C.

      Nope, nope, nope, nope, nope.

      You can also add Zig to that list, considering that Zig produces faster machine code than C.

      1. [3]
        Moonchild
        Link Parent
        Zig is not safe.

        Zig is not safe.

        1. [2]
          hungariantoast
          Link Parent
          Ah yes, I sort of looked over that word. Betrayed by my enthusiasm. Although, Andrew does have some ideas about safety in Zig: make Debug and ReleaseSafe modes fully safe

          Ah yes, I sort of looked over that word. Betrayed by my enthusiasm.

          Although, Andrew does have some ideas about safety in Zig:

          1 vote
          1. Moonchild
            (edited )
            Link Parent
            Well, if it's through runtime checks, then it won't be faster than c :)

            Well, if it's through runtime checks, then it won't be faster than c :)

            1 vote