Moonchild's recent activity

  1. Comment on China's Tiananmen Square Massacre in ~humanities

    Moonchild
    (edited )
    Link
    The images are very powerful. I think it's also worth taking a look at the cable itself.

    The images are very powerful. I think it's also worth taking a look at the cable itself.

    The army that has committed the atrocities in beijing is 27 army who are troops from shanxi province (?), are 60 percent illiterate and are called primitives.

    They were kept without news for ten days and told they were to take part in an exercise.

    On the night of 3/4 june 27 army was to attack from the west with other units from shenyang mr [smr].

    SMR troops tried to push back the crowds to let 27 army through. They failed and 27 army apcs opened fire on the crowd (both civilians and soldiers) before running them over in their apcs.

    Speculation. 27 army used because most reliable and obedient. Some considered other armies would attack 27 army but they had no ammunition.

    7 votes
  2. Comment on Why does a completely local, self-contained html file need to access gstatic.com? in ~comp

    Moonchild
    Link Parent
    Next time, you can open the inspector (ctrl+shift+i) and go to the network tab, and it'll tell you exactly what it's requesting and from where. (May need to clear cache to get it to actually...

    Next time, you can open the inspector (ctrl+shift+i) and go to the network tab, and it'll tell you exactly what it's requesting and from where.

    (May need to clear cache to get it to actually perform the request.)

    5 votes
  3. Comment on What features would you add to languages? in ~talk

  4. Comment on Super Mario Bros speedrunning: The human limit in ~games

    Moonchild
    Link Parent
    Super Mario Bros.: only two frames from perfection, in a heck of a long time!

    “Two frames from perfection” has a much better ring to it.

    Super Mario Bros.: only two frames from perfection, in a heck of a long time!

    2 votes
  5. Comment on Trump's blog isn't lighting up the internet in ~tech

    Moonchild
    Link Parent
    I don't. Yes, one person who should not have a platform no longer has one. But what does it mean that a relatively small number of monolithic companies who may not have your best interests at...

    I think it is really encouraging how effective deplatforming Trump from Twitter has been

    I don't.

    Yes, one person who should not have a platform no longer has one.

    But what does it mean that a relatively small number of monolithic companies who may not have your best interests at heart get to decide who has a platform—a voice—and who does not?

    6 votes
  6. Comment on Fortnightly Programming Q&A Thread in ~comp

    Moonchild
    Link Parent
    Look into forms of space partitioning like bsp or quadtrees. Those let you quickly identify which nodes your newly added rectangle overlaps with, and only look at rectangles within those nodes.

    Look into forms of space partitioning like bsp or quadtrees. Those let you quickly identify which nodes your newly added rectangle overlaps with, and only look at rectangles within those nodes.

    3 votes
  7. Comment on Go proposal: expression to create pointer to simple types in ~comp

    Moonchild
    (edited )
    Link
    Funny, c's supported this for 20 years now, with syntax like &(int){3}. But I guess c99 postdates plan9, so pike wouldn't have heard of it </snark> On a more serious note, I guess (don't know go)...

    Funny, c's supported this for 20 years now, with syntax like &(int){3}. But I guess c99 postdates plan9, so pike wouldn't have heard of it </snark>

    On a more serious note, I guess (don't know go) that this is analogous to clausecker's proposal?

    what's the problem with adding composite literals of simple types, like int{3}

    1 vote
  8. Comment on US-China meeting breaks into tense confrontation on camera in ~news

    Moonchild
    Link Parent
    Somebody else already linked a transcript, which covers the entirety of that video (albeit with a few typos).

    Somebody else already linked a transcript, which covers the entirety of that video (albeit with a few typos).

  9. Comment on Encrypted messaging app Signal blocked in China in ~tech

    Moonchild
    Link Parent
    It is a completely valid thing to point out, but I would avoid linking to that particular source.

    abandoning their AGPL server code

    It is a completely valid thing to point out, but I would avoid linking to that particular source.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on Can we stop pretending SMS is secure now? in ~tech

    Moonchild
    Link Parent
    That doesn't say anything about the people without smartphones, though. Do they have non-smart cell phones (thus able to receive sms)? Or do they only have a home phone, or no phone at all?

    That doesn't say anything about the people without smartphones, though. Do they have non-smart cell phones (thus able to receive sms)? Or do they only have a home phone, or no phone at all?

  11. Comment on Nvidia confirms they accidentally released a driver that removed the Ethereum-mining limitations on RTX 3060 GPUs, undermining their attempt to make the cards unappealing to cryptominers in ~tech

    Moonchild
    Link Parent
    Au contraire: DRM cannot be implemented securely in any context, regardless of whether a would-be attacker has its source code. That being said, however, authentication is not a form of DRM.

    DRM can be implemented in a way that even if you have the source it remains secure.

    Au contraire: DRM cannot be implemented securely in any context, regardless of whether a would-be attacker has its source code.

    That being said, however, authentication is not a form of DRM.

    6 votes
  12. Comment on Nvidia confirms they accidentally released a driver that removed the Ethereum-mining limitations on RTX 3060 GPUs, undermining their attempt to make the cards unappealing to cryptominers in ~tech

    Moonchild
    Link Parent
    Drivers must be cryptographically signed in order to be used. (Well, they have to be cryptographically signed to change the clock speed from its lowest setting; at which setting the cards would be...

    Drivers must be cryptographically signed in order to be used. (Well, they have to be cryptographically signed to change the clock speed from its lowest setting; at which setting the cards would be useless for mining anyway.)

    So it doesn't matter how hard it is to modify the driver, because the modified driver won't have been signed by nvidia and so won't be usable. The cryptographic signature algorithm itself is unhackable (modulo a major breakthrough, in which case we have bigger things to worry about; or a leak of nvidia's key, which is unlikely).

    13 votes
  13. Comment on What features do you want to see in a userscript manager? in ~comp

    Moonchild
    Link Parent
    Curious, why is that? Is it not a simple matter of switching from a glob match to a regex match? JS has regex built in.

    adding actual regex support would require a lot of extra code

    Curious, why is that? Is it not a simple matter of switching from a glob match to a regex match? JS has regex built in.

    1 vote
  14. Comment on UK declares China in breach of 1984 Hong Kong declaration in ~news

  15. Comment on A look at search engines with their own indexes in ~tech

    Moonchild
    Link
    Findx used to have its own index; sadly, no longer.

    Findx used to have its own index; sadly, no longer.

    1 vote
  16. Comment on To those who are on the autism spectrum, what's something you wish more people knew/understood? in ~talk

    Moonchild
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I do consider it a word with negative connotation. Cripple my executive function, attention (oh, wait, that's comorbid ADD), and ability to interact fluidly, and for what? These are the diagnostic...

    I do consider it a word with negative connotation. Cripple my executive function, attention (oh, wait, that's comorbid ADD), and ability to interact fluidly, and for what?

    These are the diagnostic criteria for ASD as specified by the DSM 5. Is there anything positive there?

    So I don't see anything wrong with the word ‘autism’ (though I do disagree with your assessment of the suffix ‘-ism’ and as such don't see any reason distinguish between ‘autistic’ and ‘autism’ in this respect).

    4 votes
  17. Comment on To those who are on the autism spectrum, what's something you wish more people knew/understood? in ~talk

    Moonchild
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I think this is just english's confusion of adjectives. You also say that you are hungry; but that's not who you are, just an attribute that you happen to have. I've never really understood...

    I completely agree with using "people first" language, but "autism" isn't something you have. It's something you are, it's something that is (a part of) your identity. (Although, don't feel forced to consider it that.)

    I think this is just english's confusion of adjectives. You also say that you are hungry; but that's not who you are, just an attribute that you happen to have.

    I've never really understood identity, so I won't speak much to that, but I will say: the point of this sort of language is to avoid reduction. So it's not (to me, at least) the distinction between ‘autistic person’ and ‘person with autism’, but rather the distinction between either of the former two and ‘autist’. The first two express an attribute of a person while the latter reduces a person to that attribute. Similarly calling somebody a ‘construction worker’ is demeaning compared with ‘person who works construction’ because the former reduces somebody to their vocation; or, calling somebody a ‘white’ instead of a ‘white person’ reduces them to their race.

    2 votes
  18. Comment on Wireless is a trap in ~tech

    Moonchild
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    On unix: install unbound enable/start its service set nameserver to 127.0.0.1 in /etc/resolv.conf kill with fire systemd-resolvd or any other services that try to overwrite that file. (Maybe chmod...

    On unix:

    • install unbound

    • enable/start its service

    • set nameserver to 127.0.0.1 in /etc/resolv.conf

      • kill with fire systemd-resolvd or any other services that try to overwrite that file. (Maybe chmod 444 & chattr +i if it's uncooperative)
    • to make sure it's working, run dig google.com. It will output a bunch of junk, one of the last lines of which should be ‘SERVER: 127.0.0.1#53(127.0.0.1)’

    On windows I have no idea.

    EDIT: also make sure your browser is using the recursive resolver. For firefox, about:preference → general → network settings. Make sure that ‘enable DNS over HTTPS’ is unchecked. For chrome I'm not sure; web search indicates that visiting chrome://flags/#dns-over-https and turning that setting off will do the trick, but that setting seems to be missing from my copy of chrome.

    3 votes
  19. Comment on Grammarly's predatory model and cultural biases in ~humanities

    Moonchild
    (edited )
    Link
    I broadly agree, but not with this specific comment: I frequently apply a spellchecker to my own writing, in the revision process. Not because I trust the spellchecker to be the arbiter of which...

    I broadly agree, but not with this specific comment:

    By far, my biggest issue with grammarly, though, is the fact that it even exists. Its existence is predicated on the assumption that there are right and wrong answers to language questions.

    I frequently apply a spellchecker to my own writing, in the revision process. Not because I trust the spellchecker to be the arbiter of which strings are permissible in text, or because I'm unwilling to write down anything which isn't in some word list, but simply because I make mistakes and a spellchecker is a heuristic tool I can use to find some of them.

    I do not, and likely would not use a tool like grammarly, for a number of reasons (some of which the linked video mentions). But the problem here is not that a program makes binary value judgements, but that humans react positivistically to them.

    4 votes
  20. Comment on The lead developer of curl analyzed its known security vulnerabilities and determined that half of them are related to it being written in C in ~comp

    Moonchild
    Link Parent
    I'm not a fan of d's deprecation cycles. Most older code won't work at all, but the deprecation cycle makes it hard to make important larger breaks like @safe-by-default.

    much more stable and useable than Rust

    I'm not a fan of d's deprecation cycles. Most older code won't work at all, but the deprecation cycle makes it hard to make important larger breaks like @safe-by-default.