7 votes

Meet the “menu engineers” helping restaurants retool during the pandemic

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  1. Thra11
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    Before this line there was no suggestion of accessibility, it's all about tricks and psychology to get you to spend more. One of the nicest things I've encountered (pre-covid) in terms of paper...

    All of these design strategies generally serve one overarching goal: making a menu as accessible as possible.

    Before this line there was no suggestion of accessibility, it's all about tricks and psychology to get you to spend more.

    One of the nicest things I've encountered (pre-covid) in terms of paper menus is a separate vegetarian and/or vegan menu (the main menu still has all the vegetarian items). I don't know if it tricked me into spending more than I would otherwise, but it made it much more pleasant for me, and meant that when they came to take our orders, I was ready to order, instead of frantically scanning the menu for little 'V's, trying to compile the vegetarian menu in my head.

    Ironically, the whole idea of a menu that's carefully crafted by a team of graphic designers and 'menu engineers' probably doesn't always work very well with a reduced menu or minimal staff. A lot of smaller restaurants often vary their menus from day to day, partly so they can offer variety without a large staff, and partly based on what ingredients they have. In this case, the menu is often just typed up and printed out in black and white.

    I have no idea what the second half of this article is going on about. It keeps talking about QR codes without even hinting at what they're using QR codes for. Are they putting QR codes on a paper menu in a restaurant, so that instead of just reading the paper menu on a sensible-sized piece of paper you can view the menu on a 4 inch phone screen? If it's a delivery menu, why is paper involved at all? If paper isn't involved, why are QR codes involved, since they're basically a way to make paper machine-readable?

    5 votes