17 votes

The pressure to constantly update games is pushing the industry to a breaking point

2 comments

  1. The_Fad Link
    "We can't keep giving these games long, post-release support. It's unsustainable." -Game Publishers "Okay, fair enough. We can go back to the way it was, with games released in a complete and...

    "We can't keep giving these games long, post-release support. It's unsustainable." -Game Publishers

    "Okay, fair enough. We can go back to the way it was, with games released in a complete and finished state but without ongoing support?" -Game Players

    "No no, that's not fiscally responsible. We'd be leaving far too much money on the table."

    "Okay, fair enough. How about focusing exclusively on expansive DLC, releasing only one or two at most before cutting the developmental cord?"

    "No no no no no, we make more money if we push out continual, small updates and charge fees."

    "Can I speak frankly for a second? It kind of seems like you guys aren't interested in making games anymore. You seem mostly interested in bleeding the money rock dry."

    "That is an OUTLANDISH statement! We play games as well, we love playing games! That's why we choose to make them, because we love them!"

    "Yeah but you just turned down two perfectly reasonable changes that can solve your problem."

    "No, you don't understand. It can't be US that's the problem, it must be the consumers that are demanding too much."

    "But hasn't the industry over the past decade innovated largely without consumer input and then iterated upon those innovations successively until--"

    "What part of the consumers are demanding too much isn't clear to you?"

    17 votes
  2. JXM Link
    I'm interested in paying $60 for a game that's complete when I buy it (and doesn't need a 50 GB day one download to even be playable). I get that games are infinitely more complex than they were...

    I'm interested in paying $60 for a game that's complete when I buy it (and doesn't need a 50 GB day one download to even be playable).

    I get that games are infinitely more complex than they were when games were shipped on a non-updatable cartridge or CD, so I'm fine with bug fix patches that trickle out over the first few months.

    But I don't need a multi-year campaign of add ons and DLC that costs hundreds of dollars.

    Honestly, the only place that seems to be happening is with mobile and indie games. Big publishers realize they can just keep releasing new content and, as you pointed out, keep bleeding customers dry for the same product.

    It's similar to how Hollywood has been ratcheting up their production of sequels and remakes over the past few decades. They've realized that a recognizable name/franchise brings in more profits.

    The current trajectory of games is only good for the publishers and not for anyone else.

    3 votes