22 votes

GOG Galaxy 2.0 - All your games and friends in one place

13 comments

  1. [10]
    NeoTheFox
    Link
    Still no Linux, despite it being one of the most requested features on their website. It's like they don't have Linux versions in their store.

    Still no Linux, despite it being one of the most requested features on their website. It's like they don't have Linux versions in their store.

    18 votes
    1. [5]
      kfwyre
      Link Parent
      In the time since GOG Galaxy has been out, I went from being a full-time Windows user, to hopping between Windows and Linux, to now being a full-time Linux user. Prior to going to Linux full-time...

      In the time since GOG Galaxy has been out, I went from being a full-time Windows user, to hopping between Windows and Linux, to now being a full-time Linux user. Prior to going to Linux full-time I was a GOG devotee and used them as my primary gaming platform, but now that I no longer run Windows I threw my lot back in with Steam.

      I was hoping Valve's Proton initiative would light a fire under GOG. After all, their main competitor was making Linux a priority, GOG had made a push to support Ubuntu years ago, and, as you pointed out, it's heavily requested on their site and has been for years. As such, it wasn't entirely out of the realm of possibility that they would eventually implement Linux support for Galaxy. Unfortunately, with this announcement, it's clear that Linux continues to be low priority for them, and I'll continue buying my games on Steam.

      It's sad, because I really did love GOG, and I think they're an incredibly valuable platform to have in the PC space. I just can't justify continuing to buy from them when Steam's Linux support is so much better.

      8 votes
      1. [4]
        Deimos
        Link Parent
        I think you also have to take into account that GOG is currently barely breaking even. They had a total profit of $7800 on $34.5M revenue last year. Linux development takes significant resources...

        I think you also have to take into account that GOG is currently barely breaking even. They had a total profit of $7800 on $34.5M revenue last year.

        Linux development takes significant resources to support a tiny minority of users, and those users tend to be the source of an outsize number of issues because of all the different possible configurations. Yes, Linux support would be nice, but I can understand if it doesn't make the cut while they're living on the edge of their resources.

        9 votes
        1. [3]
          lionirdeadman
          Link Parent
          If they provided a Flatpak, they wouldn't need to think about the different possible configurations. Yes, it's a recent development in the linux world but it's definitely something they could do...

          If they provided a Flatpak, they wouldn't need to think about the different possible configurations. Yes, it's a recent development in the linux world but it's definitely something they could do now.

          Furthermore, from my knowledge their client is Electron so it wouldn't be hard to port it over, really.

          2 votes
          1. [2]
            Deimos
            Link Parent
            I highly doubt it's that simple. It's not just a web app that interacts with a remote server, there are various functions that will need to interact with the local machine and/or other programs...

            I highly doubt it's that simple. It's not just a web app that interacts with a remote server, there are various functions that will need to interact with the local machine and/or other programs running on it.

            1 vote
            1. lionirdeadman
              Link Parent
              Well, if we only count basic functionality of "installing", "removing" and "updating", this should already be possible quite easily because of how GOG is built. For interaction with other...

              Well, if we only count basic functionality of "installing", "removing" and "updating", this should already be possible quite easily because of how GOG is built.

              For interaction with other programs, it's most probable that no application supports that on Linux already so they could implement it whatever way they need to.

              It really doesn't seem that hard to do to have a functioning GOG Galaxy on Linux.

              1 vote
    2. [4]
      lionirdeadman
      Link Parent
      They do have linux versions of games in their store but they just don't us the galaxy client because... we don't know. It's been that way for like, 5years now and it's frustrating.

      They do have linux versions of games in their store but they just don't us the galaxy client because... we don't know. It's been that way for like, 5years now and it's frustrating.

      3 votes
      1. [3]
        NeoTheFox
        Link Parent
        Yeah, even more frustrating since Galaxy is built using web technology that is pretty portable.

        Yeah, even more frustrating since Galaxy is built using web technology that is pretty portable.

        11 votes
        1. Crespyl
          Link Parent
          The worst of it is that Galaxy is required for most (all?) of the online multiplayer features of the games, so if you buy it for the Linux version you're most likely not getting the full product.

          The worst of it is that Galaxy is required for most (all?) of the online multiplayer features of the games, so if you buy it for the Linux version you're most likely not getting the full product.

          11 votes
        2. hamstergeddon
          Link Parent
          I find that really infuriating. MS Teams is similarly portable and yet no native linux client exists. Just the neutered web version.

          I find that really infuriating. MS Teams is similarly portable and yet no native linux client exists. Just the neutered web version.

          4 votes
  2. [3]
    Keegan
    Link
    Seems cool, but it seems really similar to what Discord has done. The key feature of that being connecting all your accounts/platforms into one client. This is exactly like Discord. You still need...

    Seems cool, but it seems really similar to what Discord has done. The key feature of that being connecting all your accounts/platforms into one client.

    Import all your games from PC and consoles, build and organize them into one master collection. Install and launch any PC game you own, no matter the platform.

    This is exactly like Discord. You still need to have the launcher of the platform you bought it from installed.

    The cool thing I like is this:

    Bring together your friends from all platforms and see their online status. No matter on which platform your friends are, you can chat with them. See your friends’ cross-platform achievements, game time milestones and recently played games. See who’s the master collector, completionist or spends the most time playing.

    This is pretty cool, but I'm not sure how it will work, because I'm sure other platforms will want people to stay on their launcher, so will make it tough by restricting APIs, etc.

    And of course the best thing about GOG (besides no DRM):

    Your Privacy. Your personal data will never be shared with third parties. We’re not spying on data from your computer. With a single click, you can remove imported games and friends data from our servers.

    4 votes
    1. [2]
      Deimos
      Link Parent
      I don't think Discord can do much of this, can it? I thought it could only launch games that you've launched manually before, without any library importing or anything.

      I don't think Discord can do much of this, can it? I thought it could only launch games that you've launched manually before, without any library importing or anything.

      6 votes
      1. Keegan
        Link Parent
        Hm I guess I always mistook that feature, you're right. I didn't realize Discord was only on launch.

        Hm I guess I always mistook that feature, you're right. I didn't realize Discord was only on launch.

        3 votes