13 votes

Russian actor and director back on earth after two weeks filming first film in space aboard the ISS

5 comments

  1. [4]
    drannex
    Link

    Peresild and Shipenko arrived at the station Oct. 5 as spaceflight participants for 12 days of filming their movie, “Challenge,” under a commercial agreement between Roscosmos and Moscow-based media entities.

    4 votes
    1. [3]
      Omnicrola
      Link Parent
      I had no idea this was happening, and the NASA article is a bit light on details about the movie itself, so I found this article that was published about their initial arrival on the ISS :...

      I had no idea this was happening, and the NASA article is a bit light on details about the movie itself, so I found this article that was published about their initial arrival on the ISS : https://www.theverge.com/2021/10/5/22709501/russia-soyuz-launch-actress-producer-filming-movie-space-station

      6 votes
      1. [2]
        fredo
        Link Parent
        It's really strange that this wasn't more publicized before. This is not the first time I get this impression about some awesome news about space.

        It's really strange that this wasn't more publicized before. This is not the first time I get this impression about some awesome news about space.

        4 votes
        1. drannex
          Link Parent
          Looking at who just accomplished yet another first in space, and with the ongoing political campaigns against foreign adversaries here in the states, it doesn't surprise me that there has been...

          It's really strange that this wasn't more publicized before.

          Looking at who just accomplished yet another first in space, and with the ongoing political campaigns against foreign adversaries here in the states, it doesn't surprise me that there has been nothing said about it until now and mainly as a footnote.

          3 votes
  2. Greg
    Link
    I saw some publicity stills from this and it's amazing to me how dated it looks, given what an incredible achievement it actually is. They're using technology that was designed for pure...

    I saw some publicity stills from this and it's amazing to me how dated it looks, given what an incredible achievement it actually is. They're using technology that was designed for pure utilitarianism and is in many cases decades old - which up until maybe five years ago would still have totally made sense because "that's what real spacecraft look like".

    As it is, they've jumped into a world where billionaires with a keen eye for branding are capturing the space-related headlines. I wouldn't be surprised if that's at least partially why this is happening now, but the result is that pure utility from the 90s is being set against sleek, sci-fi styled PR from the 2020s. It makes the state level agencies look absolutely plodding by comparison, which is both fascinating and a real shame to me.

    3 votes