18 votes

What do you see the world as in 50 years?

Tags: future

Just random discussion out of boredom. What do you see the world as in 50 years? Possibly war with different countries, economics, technology advancements(of course), space exploration, etc. What does everyone think?

10 comments

  1. goodbyebluemondays
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    Personally I think that the best depiction of the future can be seen in the film Children of Men in terms of massive migration which will overwhelm political systems. Nationalism will continue to...

    Personally I think that the best depiction of the future can be seen in the film Children of Men in terms of massive migration which will overwhelm political systems. Nationalism will continue to spread like a plague as a result. With the continued rise in cost of living and home ownership becoming more and more difficult to obtain, it will be difficult to see how we will adapt to losing jobs as a result of automation especially if an AI is created. There will be fewer people capable of affording rent let alone being able to purchase property. I also worry about the over use of antibiotics and fear that we are heading towards a serious pandemic that reduces the population significantly. Considering how we also seem to be struggling to make any progress in minimizing the impact of climate change, I cannot help but feel we are heading towards the death of millions, possibly even more especially as it instigates even more migration. I hate to be pessimistic, but we continue to struggle in finding solutions to all of these problems.

    13 votes
  2. [2]
    starchturrets
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    In 2068? We’ve advanced beyond silicon chips and build electronics with something else, probably graphene. More enviromentally friendly power sources mean that the OPEC countries will see falls in...

    In 2068?

    • We’ve advanced beyond silicon chips and build electronics with something else, probably graphene.

    • More enviromentally friendly power sources mean that the OPEC countries will see falls in revenue, similar to how Peru lost money after the guano era ended.

    • We’ll probably find bacteria in the solar system, or amino acids, but no aliens.

    10 votes
    1. sqew
      Link Parent
      I really hope that we are able to move beyond silicon sometime within the next 10-20 years, it'd be great to see large jumps in speed and power every year or two rather than little increases every...

      I really hope that we are able to move beyond silicon sometime within the next 10-20 years, it'd be great to see large jumps in speed and power every year or two rather than little increases every 2-3 years.

      I've seen some really interesting research on graphene CPU designs and methods of producing industrial quantities of high-grade graphene, so I'm hopeful on that front.

      4 votes
  3. sqew
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    I want to write this really aspirational post with my greatest hopes for humanity, but I'm going to try to force myself to be semi-realistic. I highly doubt that we will see a true, major war...

    I want to write this really aspirational post with my greatest hopes for humanity, but I'm going to try to force myself to be semi-realistic.

    I highly doubt that we will see a true, major war between global superpowers anytime in the next fifty years unless something in global politics changes drastically. It seems to me that leaders have realized that the sheer amount of economic damage and human suffering, along with the possibility of someone breaking out the ICBMs, in such a situation would likely cause them as much harm as the enemy they fought, even if they were to be declared the victors in the end.

    I think that there are really two possible economic pathways over the next five decades. The most likely, it seems, is one in which the status quo is preserved: the poor get poorer and the rich get richer. Even if the overall global standard of living got better in such a situation, the human toll would likely be terrible. The pathway that I hope we travel down is one in which the better parts of our nature show themselves, and we, as a species, decide to take better care of the least among us.

    As an extension of my thoughts on economics, I think that technological advancements have a huge potential to disrupt global economic patterns, mostly through automation. I'm not sure how far we will get in the next fifty years, and I doubt we will see true general AI, but I do believe that we will have to begin to confront increasing unemployment as a result of increasing automation. Whether this will come in the form of UBI or something else, I don't know.

    In terms of space exploration, I believe that we will have a permanent commercial presence in Earth orbit as a result of Jeff Bezos and Blue Origin and that we will most likely have a permanent presence on Mars because of Elon Musk and SpaceX. Though both companies may fall behind schedule, the determination that both of their leaders seem to have to get humans into space on a permanent basis seems to be so great that very few things could overcome it. Out of that, I think we will see the beginnings of a space economy and greater exploration, with orbital and lunar spacecraft construction beginning to come into play as asteroid and lunar mining become more common.

    4 votes
  4. HutchinsonianDemon
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    Overall better than now in most ways, but worse in plenty of other ways too. I mean, look at now compared to the 1960s. Things were cheaper and it was easier to provide for a family on a single...

    Overall better than now in most ways, but worse in plenty of other ways too. I mean, look at now compared to the 1960s. Things were cheaper and it was easier to provide for a family on a single salary for a working class job, but there was the institutionalize racism, fear of nuclear destruction, etc. I feel like it'll be something like that compared to now. We'll overcome some of our societal issues, but there will be some sort of dire bullshit that keeps it from being perfect. Vague, I know, but I can't see the future.

    2 votes
  5. eyehigh
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    Humanity learns to survive climate change catastrophes.

    Humanity learns to survive climate change catastrophes.

    1 vote
  6. johnlawrenceaspden
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    Destroyed by an unfriendly AI, with a light-cone of destruction spreading out from the ruins.

    Destroyed by an unfriendly AI, with a light-cone of destruction spreading out from the ruins.

    1 vote
  7. SleepyGary
    (edited )
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    I think by that point manually driven vehicles will be for recreational use on private land and perhaps niche industrial applications only. Automation & ML/AI in general will have eliminated many...

    I think by that point manually driven vehicles will be for recreational use on private land and perhaps niche industrial applications only. Automation & ML/AI in general will have eliminated many jobs and I hope we've put serious measures into a post scarcity solution.

    Quatum computers with be scaled down and something that is commonly used alongside the CPU and GPU to solve the problems it is good at.

    CRISPR-like technology will be used to cure a plethora of common genetic problems and we may be in the beginnings of a transhuman society where we're enhancing and customizing rather than just fixing.

    1 vote
  8. CALICO
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    2068 is either going to be unpredictable or a horrible mess. I'm an enthusiastic r/futurology poster. I have dreams of a glorious sci-fi future. I'm tracking the timelines for new technologies and...

    2068 is either going to be unpredictable or a horrible mess.
    I'm an enthusiastic r/futurology poster. I have dreams of a glorious sci-fi future. I'm tracking the timelines for new technologies and the late 2030's/early 2040's are gonna be something else. Technologically we're going to a really interesting place, and I feel privileged to live during such a transformative age in human history.
    Unfortunately, the human element. We're taking the express train to collapse. We could very well be looking at something like the dying Earth of Interstellar before the end of the century. The most haunting moment in that film for me probably isn't the same as most people. It's the exchange between Cooper and his father-in-law:

    Donald: I hear your meeting at the school didn’t go so well.
    Cooper: You heard? You know, it’s like we’ve forgotten who we are, Donald. Explorers, pioneers, not caretakers.
    Donald: When I was a kid, it felt like they made something new every day. Some gadget or idea. Like every day was Christmas. By six billion people, just try to imagine that. And every last one of them trying to have it all. This world isn’t so bad. And Tom will do just fine. You’re the one who doesn’t belong. Born forty years too late or forty years too early. My daughter knew it, God bless her. And your kids know it, especially Murph.
    Cooper: Well, we used to look up at the sky and wonder at our place in the stars. Now we just look down and worry about our place in the dirt.
    Donald: Cooper, you were good at something and you never got a chance to do anything with it. I’m sorry.

    I'm not without hope, however. I think a conscious Advanced General Intelligence could be a huge benefit to us. But as it would be vastly more intelligent than we are, and capable for at least as much free will as we are, it would need to want to help us. We're not capable to fix climate change at this point in time. And if we take too long, the poles will melt and Siberia will thaw and the oceans will acidify, and there's no coming back from that. Not on any reasonable timeline, anyway.
    We also need to go to space. Maybe not all of us, and not all at once, but if humanity is to survive we have to spread out. The human mind, as far as we know, if the most complex and incredible thing the universe has managed to conjure up so far. If all our eggs remain in this cosmic basket, at some point in the future we will go extinct. Far sooner than we have to. The universe is 13.7 billion years old, but it's still fairly young. There's so much time ahead, and so much to see and learn. If the only known sapient minds die out from something silly like ecological disaster, or political conflict, that would just be a waste. What has all of this been for, what was the point, if mankind was meant to die on Earth?

    1 vote
  9. flowersforchance
    (edited )
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    I think about our freedom to privacy will become a larger issue, as companies develop more ways to gather information on us. In places like the EU and Canada, there will be (somewhat) strict...

    I think about our freedom to privacy will become a larger issue, as companies develop more ways to gather information on us. In places like the EU and Canada, there will be (somewhat) strict legislation against it, but really nothing in the United States. We could see human operated vehicles be unlawful, or restricted to some extent, as driverless vehicles become the standard. I don't see it being outlawed personally, as I think driving cars will turn more into a hobby for some. We'll see a decline in the pace that new technology will be developed that, basically flattening out. While technology (like phones, laptops, etc.) will still continue to improve, I don't think you'll see the improvement like from 1998-2018. Charging phones, drones, laptops, etc. everyday will be a thing of the past, as there should be a giant breakthrough in battery technology.

    The population growth in developed countries will be negative, or around zero at best. Places like Africa will see a large population growth, and slowly start to decline as countries there become more developed.

    Water is going to become much more of an issue as droughts become more common. Perhaps there will be a shift from a meat-based diet to something more lab-grown, massively saving on water. Global Warming is going to become much worse, and I feel like ice at the poles will be next to nothing. Acidification of the ocean is a major event that many people aren't aware of, and it's going to hurt us. Bad.

    I live in the Pacific Northwest, and I fully expect us to have an ~9.0 magnitude earthquake, followed by tsunami, from now to then. This is going to essentially destroy most coastal towns, and it won't be years until communities are back to normal. In Oregon, half of our bridges could collapse, drastically slowing down help time. While specualtive, this tool from OPB is disheartning. In Portland, for example, the shaking is severe. It would take up to two years for healthcare facilities to be operating normal, a year for houses to have regular access to water & sewer, and a year and half for priority highways to be repaired. In Astoria, Oregon (on the coast), experts estimate restoring the area to normalcy will take at least a decade. We're looking at 3+ years just to have water & sewer, electricity, natural gas, healthcare. It's going to devaste the region, like no one has ever seen.

    Edit: The New Yorker has an excellent article about the Cascadia Earthquake here

    1 vote