13 votes

Microsoft admitted to private Linux developer security list

12 comments

  1. [7]
    rmgr Link
    I find Microsoft's position on Linux nowadays interesting. I hope they're not pulling some embrace, extend, extinguish bullshit but at the same time, I wonder if they even could do something like...

    I find Microsoft's position on Linux nowadays interesting. I hope they're not pulling some embrace, extend, extinguish bullshit but at the same time, I wonder if they even could do something like that to Linux at this point.

    7 votes
    1. [6]
      Wes Link Parent
      Microsoft hasn't used this tactic in approximately 20 years, and has changed dramatically as a company since then. I don't see any reason that they would suddenly return to this tactic now,...

      I hope they're not pulling some embrace, extend, extinguish bullshit

      Microsoft hasn't used this tactic in approximately 20 years, and has changed dramatically as a company since then. I don't see any reason that they would suddenly return to this tactic now, especially after all the legal trouble it gave them.

      I'm actually surprised how often I see this concern even mentioned at all. Why won't people let EEE go?

      11 votes
      1. Diff Link Parent
        Because as recently as a few years ago they were using straight up malware tactics to get people to upgrade to their latest OS. Have they actually changed?

        Because as recently as a few years ago they were using straight up malware tactics to get people to upgrade to their latest OS. Have they actually changed?

        26 votes
      2. moocow1452 Link Parent
        You're asking why the group that is prepared and/or paranoid enough to make their own operating systems might hold an unreasonable grudge against the former nigh-monopoly of operating systems just...

        Why won't people let EEE go?

        You're asking why the group that is prepared and/or paranoid enough to make their own operating systems might hold an unreasonable grudge against the former nigh-monopoly of operating systems just because they're on speaking terms here and now?

        19 votes
      3. MrGrey Link Parent
        The day that everyone is using open business document standard formats is the day EEE is actually over. Until then it's the most successful domination of business space in history and it's legacy...

        The day that everyone is using open business document standard formats is the day EEE is actually over. Until then it's the most successful domination of business space in history and it's legacy is ongoing.

        16 votes
      4. Codo_Sapien Link Parent
        If it can happen once, it can happen again, given the right circumstances. Heh, could you imagine what a "Hail, Hydra" moment that would be? Realistically, though, I don't think they are...

        Why won't people let EEE go?

        If it can happen once, it can happen again, given the right circumstances. Heh, could you imagine what a "Hail, Hydra" moment that would be?

        Realistically, though, I don't think they are monolithic enough to kill Linux anymore.

        You're right, they are definitely a different company now, with different goals in mind. I think they've set their sights on PaaS and SaaS, and instead of playing the yours-vs-mine game, they want you to play ball in their stadium.

        9 votes
      5. Eva Link Parent
        Twenty years ago wasn't that long ago at all.

        Twenty years ago wasn't that long ago at all.

        8 votes
  2. [5]
    tomf Link
    I wouldn't be surprised if (a ways down the road) we see Windows basically being a another flavor of Linux with a Windows compatability layer (basically a juiced up WINE) for legacy software.

    I wouldn't be surprised if (a ways down the road) we see Windows basically being a another flavor of Linux with a Windows compatability layer (basically a juiced up WINE) for legacy software.

    4 votes
    1. [2]
      moocow1452 Link Parent
      I'm of the opinion that Microsoft doesn't necessarily want to outmode Windows, as Enterprise is kind of a big deal for them with all the sunk cost into legacy and what have you. I could see a...

      I'm of the opinion that Microsoft doesn't necessarily want to outmode Windows, as Enterprise is kind of a big deal for them with all the sunk cost into legacy and what have you. I could see a world where what is presented as Windows OS is mostly just an internet browser, with a separate hypervisor to systems to emulate legacy Win32 programs, Xbox games, WSL processes, maybe even Android Apps, since it's far more lucrative for Microsoft to sell services rather than be the OS for your computer, especially with Chromebooks nipping at their heels.

      8 votes
      1. tomf Link Parent
        That does sound more realistic in the context of MS -- especially with the direction of the market. But, as almost always, MS is a bit late to the game. I would like to see MS take another stab at...

        That does sound more realistic in the context of MS -- especially with the direction of the market. But, as almost always, MS is a bit late to the game.

        I would like to see MS take another stab at the mobile market. I've only briefly used their mobile OS, but it was decent for a somewhat minimalist system. If they could sort out a system similar to iMessage, they'd probably pick up a lot of traction. But that is a whole other can of worms.

        1 vote
    2. [2]
      rmgr Link Parent
      Oh man if that happened I'd be stoked to run Windows

      Oh man if that happened I'd be stoked to run Windows

      3 votes
      1. Diff Link Parent
        I mean heck even now with the new WSL, file operations are faster through WSL than native Windows. It'll be interesting to see if we start seeing any programs specifically targeting the WSL.

        I mean heck even now with the new WSL, file operations are faster through WSL than native Windows. It'll be interesting to see if we start seeing any programs specifically targeting the WSL.

        5 votes