5 votes

Oracle's BlueKai tracks you across the web. That data spilled online

10 comments

  1. [10]
    Nepenthaceae
    Link
    I had a really hard time coming to terms with the sheer amount of data tech companies siphon. My conclusion is to avoid ads like they are the devil and to be as skeptical as possible of anything I...

    I had a really hard time coming to terms with the sheer amount of data tech companies siphon. My conclusion is to avoid ads like they are the devil and to be as skeptical as possible of anything I see. This comes with its own drawbacks but I rather work a little harder than be a sheep to my own data.
    The only ads I see are from youtubers who incorporate the ad into the video and more often than not, I unsubscribe them.

    5 votes
    1. [2]
      cfabbro
      Link Parent
      Pssst... SponsorBlock. You're welcome. ;)

      The only ads I see are from youtubers who incorporate the ad into the video and more often than not, I unsubscribe them.

      Pssst... SponsorBlock. You're welcome. ;)

      6 votes
    2. [7]
      chas
      Link Parent
      I only know of two effective ways anyone can fight back. You either (1) throw out all your electronic devices and spend your life in a submarine somewhere at sea, or (2) use software to bury your...

      I only know of two effective ways anyone can fight back. You either (1) throw out all your electronic devices and spend your life in a submarine somewhere at sea, or (2) use software to bury your real web-browsing and purchases under a mountain of spurious data.

      Unfortunately, if you want your purchases to remain untracked, the second approach is cost-prohibitive. I might not want Amazon to track which books I read, but I can't afford to spend $10,000 a month on random literature.

      4 votes
      1. [5]
        Nepenthaceae
        Link Parent
        Option one is getting more interesting every time I read shit like this. Shit I know is happening all the time, everywhere, to everyone... but being confronted with it still doesn't sit right with...

        Option one is getting more interesting every time I read shit like this. Shit I know is happening all the time, everywhere, to everyone... but being confronted with it still doesn't sit right with me.

        Option two looks a lot like self-hosting and I've looked into that and discussed it with peers, that's just not my cup of tea.

        Does anyone know if and how my real-life purchases are being tracked and/or monetized?
        I mean, if my bank is selling that kinds of data on me I'd like to know so that I can start looking for a bank that doesn't (if that's even an option)

        5 votes
        1. [4]
          chas
          (edited )
          Link Parent
          I don't know about banking, but Gmail famously takes it upon itself to create a database from your email receipts to track your online purchases. Option 2 doesn't require running a server, but it...

          I don't know about banking, but Gmail famously takes it upon itself to create a database from your email receipts to track your online purchases.

          Option 2 doesn't require running a server, but it requires you run client-side scripts or programs to make fake requests. You can find a description in this paper about TrackMeNot.

          2 votes
          1. [3]
            Nepenthaceae
            Link Parent
            I'm guessing Microsoft's no different.

            I'm guessing Microsoft's no different.

            1 vote
            1. [2]
              chas
              Link Parent
              It's possible. I haven't got around to researching a better email client to Gmail yet. It kills me, because Gmail is absolutely the worst when it comes to privacy.

              It's possible. I haven't got around to researching a better email client to Gmail yet. It kills me, because Gmail is absolutely the worst when it comes to privacy.

              2 votes
              1. Nepenthaceae
                Link Parent
                I turned to ProtonMail. It's open-source, encrypted and all the good stuff. The problem with this kind of encryption is, whenever you send an e-mail to a non-encryption platform (so pretty much...

                I turned to ProtonMail. It's open-source, encrypted and all the good stuff. The problem with this kind of encryption is, whenever you send an e-mail to a non-encryption platform (so pretty much all the time) the other party has an unencrypted version of your mail and they get their data on you all the same.

                3 votes
      2. rosco
        Link Parent
        Alternatively, and post Covid quarantine, cash and brick and mortars are still a very viable option.

        Alternatively, and post Covid quarantine, cash and brick and mortars are still a very viable option.

        1 vote