rosco's recent activity

  1. Comment on Thousands of people are trying to leave QAnon, but getting out is almost impossible in ~health

    rosco
    Link Parent
    Haha, that's pretty awesome to hear!

    Haha, that's pretty awesome to hear!

    1 vote
  2. Comment on Thousands of people are trying to leave QAnon, but getting out is almost impossible in ~health

    rosco
    Link Parent
    If you can point me to a mommy blogger who has become a radical leftist I'd love to see it. I have never run across that type of radicalization.

    If you can point me to a mommy blogger who has become a radical leftist I'd love to see it. I have never run across that type of radicalization.

    7 votes
  3. Comment on In celebration of No Time To Die releasing next week, what are your favorite Bond books? in ~books

    rosco
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    I'm a big fan of you only live twice, the movie is a really interesting departure from the book. Most of the characters are the same but their roles and importance vary heavily. Some of the scenes...

    I'm a big fan of you only live twice, the movie is a really interesting departure from the book. Most of the characters are the same but their roles and importance vary heavily. Some of the scenes in the book would have been impossible to translate to film.

    To everyone saying they haven't read the books, give them a go. They are incredibly short, most used book stores have a cheap little section (like 50 cents to 1 dollar), and they are a breeze to read.

    2 votes
  4. Comment on "The Hiring Post" - How to hire exceptional engineers in ~tech

    rosco
    Link
    I have some pretty serious feels about this. I'm diving into a very anecdotal rant, so please take it with a grain of salt. I think the intentions of the author are on the right path, but like so...

    I have some pretty serious feels about this. I'm diving into a very anecdotal rant, so please take it with a grain of salt. I think the intentions of the author are on the right path, but like so many engineers they have focused on the task and missed the bigger picture.

    I'm currently hiring engineers for my company and my partner just started as a PM at Google. I think this article articulates the current status quo: If you have the high technical capacity you don't have to be a pleasant or functioning human being. You can be misogynistic. You can be unhygienic. You can be an asshole. While the rest of the world is progressing, engineers seem to have entrenched themselves deep into the archaic boys club the rest of us are trying to shut down. Parts of this article perpetuate it.

    When my partner was interviewed she fielded questions such as "What do you do if a developer says they have no need for your role here and you have to justify your presence?", or "How do you handle a potentially hostile engineer?", or "Tells us some ways you engage with 'prickly' teammates?". It boiled down to, convince us you can work with and control an self-righteous, sexist team. So far, the work experience has mirrored the questions.

    My own experience has been equally disappointing. My background is in remote sensing, and while there are similar issues of sexism in our field, a general lack of social skills is not tolerated. While hiring for an ML engineer, the interview was our only opportunity to weed out candidates who otherwise excelled at the technical problems they were given. One was openly hostile to our female technical lead, two were dismissive, and a large percentage were terrible communicators. The point of an interview isn't to understand how competent an engineer is at writing code, it is to understand how they will work within the greater team. How will they respond when they hit a roadblock? What is their communication style like? Will they be defensive of their code? Can they take direction from someone who doesn't look or think like they do?

    In 5 more years there will be a hit piece about this article written by someone similar on how we need to move away from strictly data driven results and I think I'll be more inclined to agree with them. I know plenty of folks who are incredibly talented engineers, and I wouldn't want to work with most of them. I believe 'data driven' metrics allow engineers to maintain anti-social behavior and with all of the effort to get women into stem, why are we ignoring the anti-women culture this behavior creates?

    That said, I really enjoyed their perspective on aggressive or hostile interviews. Those truly need to be a thing of the past. I also fully agree that preparing candidates for their interviews and giving them a reasonable understanding of timeline and expectations is largely overlooked.

    With that in mind I'd like to take a go a refining their message. When structured correctly and carried out with openness and positivity, interviews can be a truly enlightening process and provide candidates with the runway to show off their personality and skills (regardless of confidence). Employed in tandem with technical problems, interviewers can get a well rounded picture of what to expect when their candidate starts with the side benefit of stymying problematic team culture (if that is a priority of the team).

    12 votes
  5. Comment on What's something about yourself that you had to face? in ~life

    rosco
    Link Parent
    Just popping in with a link to a relevant Ted Lasso scene: "Be curious, not judgmental"

    Just popping in with a link to a relevant Ted Lasso scene: "Be curious, not judgmental"

    3 votes
  6. Comment on What have you been eating, drinking, and cooking? in ~food

    rosco
    Link Parent
    If you have room, freezing bread is a great option. I'll usually eat it fresh for a day, then cut off the amount I'll want for the next day and freeze the rest. It springs back beautifully from...

    If you have room, freezing bread is a great option. I'll usually eat it fresh for a day, then cut off the amount I'll want for the next day and freeze the rest. It springs back beautifully from the toaster!

    4 votes
  7. Comment on What have you been eating, drinking, and cooking? in ~food

    rosco
    Link Parent
    Your takeaway from the second paragraph is such a great perspective on life. Glad you enjoyed the bean sprouts!

    Your takeaway from the second paragraph is such a great perspective on life. Glad you enjoyed the bean sprouts!

    2 votes
  8. Comment on Is it me or are "news" articles on the web getting more and more irritating to read in ~tech

    rosco
    Link Parent
    Seconding NYT and adding the small gripe that their crossword puzzle is under a separate subscription.

    Seconding NYT and adding the small gripe that their crossword puzzle is under a separate subscription.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on Is it me or are "news" articles on the web getting more and more irritating to read in ~tech

    rosco
    Link Parent
    I'm with you on the pricing but the veeeery Amazon friendly articles put me off. 1 vote for the Guardian or the Atlantic.

    I'm with you on the pricing but the veeeery Amazon friendly articles put me off. 1 vote for the Guardian or the Atlantic.

    4 votes
  10. Comment on What is something you've changed your mind about recently? in ~talk

    rosco
    Link Parent
    Yes, I've always been a fan of the Chinese-style but I actually prefer the Vietnamese ones now.

    Yes, I've always been a fan of the Chinese-style but I actually prefer the Vietnamese ones now.

    2 votes
  11. Comment on List of Rock and Roll movies? in ~movies

    rosco
    Link Parent
    Oh man, the sound track and it's use in that movie is absolutely perfect. Going to give personal favorite to the Golden Years scene.

    Oh man, the sound track and it's use in that movie is absolutely perfect. Going to give personal favorite to the Golden Years scene.

    1 vote
  12. Comment on What is something you've changed your mind about recently? in ~talk

    rosco
    Link Parent
    Seconded! I tried golden beets for the first time this year and am in love!

    Seconded!

    I tried golden beets for the first time this year and am in love!

    2 votes
  13. Comment on What is something you've changed your mind about recently? in ~talk

    rosco
    Link
    There are a lot of serious ones here so I'm going to jump in with u/streblo and go with food. Big covid discoveries for me were that contrary to what I believed spring roles are delicious. I'm not...

    There are a lot of serious ones here so I'm going to jump in with u/streblo and go with food.

    Big covid discoveries for me were that contrary to what I believed spring roles are delicious. I'm not sure why but when I was younger I found the texture to be too akin to a condom. Now I eat them at least once a week. 10/10 delicious dinner option.

    6 votes
  14. Comment on Hands-on with Facebook and Ray-Ban’s first pair of smart glasses in ~tech

    rosco
    Link
    Just going to echo the other comments here. Feels like another weird dystopian turn in this bizarre new decade. Let's hope they go the way of google glass.

    Just going to echo the other comments here. Feels like another weird dystopian turn in this bizarre new decade. Let's hope they go the way of google glass.

    3 votes
  15. Comment on Plans for $400-billion new city in the American desert unveiled in ~design

    rosco
    Link Parent
    I totally get the cost benefits aren't there, but when we say "let nature reclaim it" it really just means let's forget about this brownfield site. Outside of waiting thousands of years we'll have...

    I totally get the cost benefits aren't there, but when we say "let nature reclaim it" it really just means let's forget about this brownfield site. Outside of waiting thousands of years we'll have to address at some point.

    Starting fresh is definitely easier, but that's why this proposal feels like a copout to me. It's effectively a "fuck it, the fed will deal with our mess".

    1 vote
  16. Comment on Plans for $400-billion new city in the American desert unveiled in ~design

    rosco
    Link Parent
    Definitely! Pie in the sky always seems to get the most attention and funding unfortunately. I don't know a ton about the Carlsbad plant other than it seems to be next in a long line of coastal...

    Definitely! Pie in the sky always seems to get the most attention and funding unfortunately.

    I don't know a ton about the Carlsbad plant other than it seems to be next in a long line of coastal power/desal plants that seem to be going offline. There was one in San Luis Obispo that was paired with a nuclear called Diablo Canyon that is going offline, the power plant at Moss Landing has gone that way as well. One of the most interesting ideas proposed with the Moss landing facility was to turn it into a giant water driven battery to offset peak usage times. I think as we move away from traditional forms of energy it will change our relationship with desalination pretty significantly. Here in the central coast we have moratoriums on construction until issues around water access is solved so there is a pretty significant incentive to tacking this issue.

    The quote was from a info page on desal in general, not for or against just general info. The one issue in your retyping is that it is 40,000 homes and 300,000 people. I think in the United States we usually count an average of 4 persons to a home so it's over to 50% at 160,000 people to 300,000 people (if we convert apples to apples). That makes it a little less palatable.

    (Also I'm going to address your other comment here) I totally agree that there doesn't seem to be another option. If you want to do a real deep dive into ridiculous policy check out California's issues with water rights in general. The way we bake them into land rights has effectively circumvented any ability for us to regulate them effectively. That's why you can grow alfalfa, which takes up double the water needed as almonds, as a cattle feed or a low value export crop.

    As far as the Moss Landing Project Goes there are a ton of links online. My favorite is a white paper put together by a consortium in the bay but I'll link a few others including from a 3rd party environmental impact group, regional governmental report, and by the pacific institute. It's a really interesting project and I've kind of waffled between both sides. In the end, many of the final decisions come down to it having high cost, low offset of water issues, and high ecological impacts. Super happy to dive deeper if you're interested.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on Plans for $400-billion new city in the American desert unveiled in ~design

    rosco
    Link Parent
    I agree with nearly all your points, particularly your last one. All of them add up to some really interesting ideas around new development. I'm working on a project right now in the central...

    I agree with nearly all your points, particularly your last one. All of them add up to some really interesting ideas around new development. I'm working on a project right now in the central valley looking at the bio-diversity and carbon offset effects of creating fake beaver dams in smaller creeks and rivers. People are definitely working on some really interesting and innovating stuff. I can get a little doom and gloom but I think it's because so many of these "solutions" are lauded as a silver bullet. I love your last thought "Especially if higher density which enables returning more land to wilderness in more arable lands more capable of sustaining large biomass." And I'd like to riff on it.

    Sorry if this is too much but I love thinking about innovative infrastructure and climate resilience. I think a big grip I have with the thinking in the proposed "revolutionary city" is that it effectively goes "well things are bad so fuck everything and start fresh". To me that is just going to make new problems. We have a ton of already developed and underutilized land. Why not revitalize one of the 21st century ghost towns in the midwest like Detroit or Cleveland? Cost? I mean if you're going to drop 400 billion, lets put some of that into pollution mitigation and superfund site cleanup. I'm sure it will be a more complex project as you would need to work with local stakeholders and address current issues, but that would allow you to get out in front of the same problems a new city would face 10-20 years down the line. It just feels like the incredibly capitalistic mindset that cutting losses, regardless of the impact, is preferable to fixing an standing issue. There are some really interesting revitalization projects going on in cities from Detroit to Grand Rapids and I think those programs, with community co-development, could provide a much bigger impact than a brand new city. I'm fully with you, lets build up in the cities we have with the infrastructure in place to support it rather than chasing the shiny new thing.

    1 vote
  18. Comment on Plans for $400-billion new city in the American desert unveiled in ~design

    rosco
    Link Parent
    That's a pretty cool innovation. If that works functionally at scale then awesome, the energy input is fixed. I read this comment after replying to your other one, so i didn't understand the part...

    That's a pretty cool innovation. If that works functionally at scale then awesome, the energy input is fixed. I read this comment after replying to your other one, so i didn't understand the part about the "engineer's dream" but I think I do now. I still have gripes about origin of water and impacts to marine life though. Saudi Arabia is a bigger "sea desert" than anywhere on the western seaboard. We have a particularly vivid marine ecosystem because of the upwelling that occurs here, so what works in Saudi might not function similarly here.

    That said, I'm really excited at the possibility of a carbon neutral desal system and really appreciate you sharing the article. If you want a pretty even keeled debate about marine impacts check out the Moss Landing desalination project and the debate that has followed it.

    2 votes
  19. Comment on Plans for $400-billion new city in the American desert unveiled in ~design

    rosco
    Link Parent
    I'm not trying to demonize desal, it's just been sold as a silver bullet to the water crisis we're witnessing throughout the majority of the western states. Desal will inevitably have a negative...

    I'm not trying to demonize desal, it's just been sold as a silver bullet to the water crisis we're witnessing throughout the majority of the western states. Desal will inevitably have a negative impact on the marine environment, any really large scale extractive process will. Like fishing, damages from desal can be lessened but they will still be there. I'm not saying we completely avoid environmental damage, any human centered activity will likely cause some damage. I just don't understand why they couldn't select a more hospitable environment for the project. Secondly, the problem is a question of scale. If you are going to create a city of 5 million people (five times larger than San Francisco), that's a lot of water to get from desal. So we're not talking about one plant.

    I also completely agree that we could use solar instead. The benefit of pairing with gas or nuclear is that the cooling needs of those facilities already effectively cook the salt water pumped through their systems so you are using water that is already sterile and the impact to marine life has already occurred. Again, not endorsing those systems, just that if they are already operating you might as well use the water too. But beyond that is the magnitude of energy needed. I don't think they can have "sustainable energy production and a purportedly drought-resistant water system" if you need excessive energy to ensure the latter. The current power to water ratio is below:

    “In order to supply water to 300,000 people, the Carlsbad desal plant will require the equivalent of a 31.3 megawatt power plant operating around the clock — enough electricity to power nearly 40,000 average California households for a year.”

    I guess my proposal is rather than bring the resources to us we should be building where the resources already exist and will continue to exist into the future with current climate models.

    1 vote
  20. Comment on Plans for $400-billion new city in the American desert unveiled in ~design

    rosco
    Link Parent
    I'm not sure I get your point though. To me this feels like what we've seen with dams across the west. They underproduce in terms of electricity and have huge impacts to riverine systems and the...

    I'm not sure I get your point though. To me this feels like what we've seen with dams across the west. They underproduce in terms of electricity and have huge impacts to riverine systems and the associated species. The dream in that case is more of a nightmare that we're only just starting to address. Check out the Klamath Dam removal if you're interested.

    I could be misinterpreting your comment, and if so I apologize, but we know a good number of the impacts of desal at this point and without some pretty radical technological changes (and if they come I am all for it) there doesn't seem to be a real feasible way to avoid those impacts. Marine areas are actually improving in a lot of areas thanks to the introduction of MPAs and fishing limits.

    My suggestion is that projects like this should take place in areas with the resources available. New England seems like a potential location as precipitation trends seems to be increasing there and could feasibly support a much larger population.

    3 votes