8 votes

Internet is slow, but only when opening a new domain

Internet in my fiancee's house is weird. Once I open up a domain, going to links in the same domain is quite fast, but if I try opening another domain in another tab it is super slow. On Chrome it is really bad, Firefox is better but still sluggish. This occurs similarly on different devices running Windows, Linux, and Android. What could be causing this?

7 comments

  1. [5]
    Adys
    Link
    Your post is hinting at the DNS configuration in your router. Are you able to change it? If it's set to your ISPs DNS servers and your isp isn't a particularly good one, this could be it. Are you...

    Your post is hinting at the DNS configuration in your router. Are you able to change it? If it's set to your ISPs DNS servers and your isp isn't a particularly good one, this could be it.

    Are you able to reproduce the issue on other people's networks?

    10 votes
    1. [4]
      mrbig
      Link Parent
      Yeah, I have access to the router. I just have to figure out how to access it, the interface, etc. When I use my smartphone, tablet, and laptop on my house, the issue does not occur.

      Yeah, I have access to the router. I just have to figure out how to access it, the interface, etc.

      Are you able to reproduce the issue on other people's networks?

      When I use my smartphone, tablet, and laptop on my house, the issue does not occur.

      3 votes
      1. [2]
        Adys
        Link Parent
        192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 will usually do it. Google the router's model name, or your ISP's name, there's lots of communities that have help and wiki articles for all kinds of variations. "Change...

        192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 will usually do it. Google the router's model name, or your ISP's name, there's lots of communities that have help and wiki articles for all kinds of variations.

        "Change DNS [isp name]" should be fruitful. If you do change it, try 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 as the DNS servers to use instead.

        7 votes
        1. Keegan
          Link Parent
          Also try 10.0.0.1 or 10.0.1.1 for the router if those did not work :) These 4 cover the vast majority of most router IPs.

          Also try 10.0.0.1 or 10.0.1.1 for the router if those did not work :)

          These 4 cover the vast majority of most router IPs.

          4 votes
      2. Keegan
        Link Parent
        I would agree that it sure sounds like a DNS issue. @mrbig if you aren’t aware of what DNS is, a brief explanation is as follows: when you type in a URL or your device queries a website, your...

        I would agree that it sure sounds like a DNS issue.

        @mrbig if you aren’t aware of what DNS is, a brief explanation is as follows: when you type in a URL or your device queries a website, your device will first send the domain (the stuff between https:// and before the / after that) to a DNS server. That server then returns to you an IP address. Then you device uses that to continue the process of loading the site. This result gets saved for a period of time on your device, so that might explain why going to the same site that is already open is a normal speed.


        To verify that this is the issue you could do the stuff below:

        First we should figure out what your current DNS provider is, since if they are slow then that could cause the issue! There’s a few steps you could take to examine this to determine what your current DNS provider is. This site will give you the IP address and name of your DNS after you click the button there. Alternatively (and more reliably), on a Windows device you can open a command prompt and type ipconfig, it will list out a bunch of info, but what matters is the “Connection-specific DNS Suffix”.

        It’s most likely that the DNS you find from this will be owned by your ISP. These are often-times slow and can have downtime even if the internet itself is working. So many people switch their DNS to one owned by a larger company such as Google, Cloudflare, etc.

        Before you switch the DNS in your router, it’s easier to test on a single device if changing the DNS improves load times/fixes the problem. This guide has direction for most OSes and how to change the DNS server.

        I would suggest doing it on Windows first. If you trust Google, you can use 8.8.8.8 as the primary server and 8.8.4.4 as the secondary. Alternatively, Cloudflare has a great DNS at 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1.

        If changing it to either of those improved the load times, then you can either go through that process for all of your devices, or if you do get access to the router then you can just set it in there and all devices will automatically use the DNS you set there. If that didn’t fix it, you could change it back to what it was before, or keep it if you want.


        This is a bit technical, so here’s a link to a LinusTechTips video that explains DNS better than I ever could: https://youtu.be/Rck3BALhI5c

        and here is a video explaining the benefits of changing your DNS to Cloudflare: https://youtu.be/kqnvrjgyEMc


        Ninja edit: It seems others have provided the same answer I have, but hopefully my information is still helpful to you.

        7 votes
  2. [2]
    moocow1452
    Link
    This might be something that the ISP would have to look at, but assuming that's not an option, might want to narrow down if it's the modem, the router, or the wireless if they're not all the same...

    This might be something that the ISP would have to look at, but assuming that's not an option, might want to narrow down if it's the modem, the router, or the wireless if they're not all the same device. Power Cycle everything is always a pretty good option, maybe check if there are some weird cache settings, or do a factory reset if it's something your comfortable with and/or can easily do.

    2 votes
    1. Keegan
      Link Parent
      I would agree that this is the first step to try. Turning things on and off is much simpler than going into DNS settings like @Adys and I suggested. I would suggest waiting for a few seconds after...

      I would agree that this is the first step to try. Turning things on and off is much simpler than going into DNS settings like @Adys and I suggested.

      I would suggest waiting for a few seconds after you have turned it off before you turn it back on. That will ensure that it’s truly off even if all the lights have turned off.

      2 votes