Adys's recent activity

  1. Comment on Does anyone know a search engine for news articles only? in ~tech

    Adys
    Link Parent
    I’m wondering if anyone tried to just do a search engine for news, instead of generic ones that have news tabs.

    I’m wondering if anyone tried to just do a search engine for news, instead of generic ones that have news tabs.

    1 vote
  2. Does anyone know a search engine for news articles only?

    I’m looking for a search engine just for news; kind of a Google News competitor but something independent. Any ideas? I know of Ground News, it’s already pretty good though it’s less search engine...

    I’m looking for a search engine just for news; kind of a Google News competitor but something independent. Any ideas?

    I know of Ground News, it’s already pretty good though it’s less search engine and more aggregator. Open to hear more.

    16 votes
  3. Comment on I got paid $0.33 for confirming with Google that I got a haircut where I did and paid with a card in ~tech

    Adys
    Link Parent
    Your comment is absolute fan fiction … Google isn’t buying information. 33c is an obscenely high price for this. Another poster got it right; they’re buying QA. And op installed Google rewards to...

    Your comment is absolute fan fiction …

    Google isn’t buying information. 33c is an obscenely high price for this. Another poster got it right; they’re buying QA.

    And op installed Google rewards to be asked this question, for financial compensation. This is akin to telling an eBay seller “Just remember you sold that thing to the buyer! They will not forget it!”

    16 votes
  4. Comment on Is anyone here a consultant? I have questions... in ~life

    Adys
    Link Parent
    I don’t have much to add but: Most lawyers will not help with taxation questions. You need an accountant, one that knows your financial situation. Whether you get that equity through an email or a...

    I don’t have much to add but: Most lawyers will not help with taxation questions. You need an accountant, one that knows your financial situation. Whether you get that equity through an email or a very official looking contract won’t change anything about those implications, it’s the way the equity is delivered that will. And that … is a talk you should have with an accountant (though even a preliminary talk with ChatGPT will offer guidance).

    4 votes
  5. Comment on Is anyone here a consultant? I have questions... in ~life

    Adys
    Link Parent
    Hard disagree to all of this, especially when you're just starting out (and definitely in OP's case). For longer-term missions, sure, you want a robust contract because there's more chances of...

    You may be given a consulting agreement by your client. You definitely want a lawyer to review it. Do not assume you understand the agreement just because it all makes sense to you. Many words in a contract have a specific legal meaning that may not be what you think it is.

    Hard disagree to all of this, especially when you're just starting out (and definitely in OP's case).

    For longer-term missions, sure, you want a robust contract because there's more chances of something going wrong, so you want to clearly outline procedures. But the outlining is more important than the "fairness" of the contract in this case. Like "What happens if you pay late" -> "You get a $X surcharge per day" vs "Hey, you paid late so I'm just gonna randomly add numbers to the invoice and threaten you".

    When you do the same thing a lot, also yes sure, have a lawyer draft you a standard contract to send out yourself. This is primarily so that YOU have consistency across your clients: Same payment terms, recovery procedures, arbitration rules, etc.

    Here are a few facts of consulting:

    1. Having parties acting in good faith is more important than having a good contract. If the counterparty is acting in bad faith, the contract gives you ammunition, but you're still very fucked. Pick your clients more carefully than you review the terms.
    2. Reviewing contracts professionally is expensive for both parties and will severely cut into the margin of the job. You may end up doing the job at a loss because you spent the entire profit from it on the lawyer.
    3. You can spend your whole life redlining, you won't actually know what WILL go wrong. So you spent $3k redoing the whole contract only to get screwed by some other thing you completely overlooked and that wasn't even in the contract in the first place. The lesson to draw from that? "Well, I wasted time, money, and got fucked anyway. I should have spent that doing due-diligence on my client instead."

    (seriously, before spending even $100 on a lawyer, spend half of that digging dirt on your prospect, especially from other contractors similar to you that have dealt with the client before)

    Also, In most countries, this whole "this doesn't mean what you think it means" is kinda nonsense. Plain english is fine. Here's my favourite little factoid about this in fact:
    The whole thing about "signing a contract" is bullshit in the first place. I'm sure you already knew you don't need to do the whole print-sign-scan song-and-dance and a digital signature is sufficient (people use docusign after all, right?). But really, even the signature is useless: It's all about intent, and being able to reliably say that the parties have read, understood and accepted a clear set of terms. In other words, an email is a contract: I have given out equity with zero PDFs/signatures, simply by stating the terms in clear plain english in an email and "If you accept these terms, please respond to this email with the words "I accept these terms". Yes it works. Don't need a lawyer. Intent matters. Saved thousands.

    7 votes
  6. Comment on Is anyone here a consultant? I have questions... in ~life

    Adys
    Link Parent
    I don't have a good answer to this. I succeeded at it because of sheer luck, I think. I stayed extremely curious, and I get burned out if I do the same thing too many times, which has forced me to...

    how do you ensure you get to solve unique issues and that it stays that way?

    I don't have a good answer to this. I succeeded at it because of sheer luck, I think. I stayed extremely curious, and I get burned out if I do the same thing too many times, which has forced me to simply quit jobs and clients I no longer enjoyed.

    What formal education, if any, and what informal education did you acquire yourself to be equipped for these kinds of presumably challenging tasks?

    Formal: None, I quit school at 14.

    Informal: I started self-teaching programming and reverse engineering, then entrepreneurship -> starting my own startup with cofounders was a good way to speed-run the "wearing MANY hats" thing. I got burned out coding so after having done it for 17 years, I stopped being able to really code (I get seriously stressed and headachy if I start). I moved to management and got into it; the past few years I've been powering through a lot of new knowledge: VC world, politics, grant funding, financial planning, how money flows in the EU, etc etc... it's fascinating, to be honest, and I love that I'm still acquiring so many new skills after two decades in my career.

    feel like I would severely lack practical experience and knowledge, were I to want to start consulting in “my” area right now.

    Yeah I mean plenty of people call themselves consultants with a day of experience on their resume. I think it's the other reason why consultants are despised, there's a lot of people out there selling lukewarm air. I would say, a good consultant has skills which are very difficult to acquire in any way, be it either expensive, taking a long time, or requiring a particular network. I also personally expect the consultants I work with to be top-tier, and if you're not there yet, I would expect them to call themselves "freelancer". But yeah, it's just a title, and people interpret it however they want so at this point it's all very meaningless.

    being able to experience work that’s not the same over and over in one’s job until retirement sure sounds appealing

    If you can't do it passively, do it actively. Apply the google 20% rule to your own life: Budget a chunk of your work time to learning new work skills and applying them professionally. But like, radically different things, not just "Oh I know React so I'll learn Vue", more like "Oh I know React so I'll learn to read sheet music and make a sheet music react app".

    2 votes
  7. Comment on Is anyone here a consultant? I have questions... in ~life

    Adys
    Link Parent
    Ah, and since you asked about rates. I have in the past been able to sell my most niche / rarest skills at what I consider absolutely crazy rates (~$500 / hr). Despite having acquired much rarer...

    Ah, and since you asked about rates.

    I have in the past been able to sell my most niche / rarest skills at what I consider absolutely crazy rates (~$500 / hr). Despite having acquired much rarer and nicher skills since, my prices have gone way down due to the current market, which has made consultants the first to go in cost-cutting measures.

    What you might know as the "Big Four" are four consulting firms (Deloitte, KPMG, PwC and EY) which are able to charge these ridiculous rates (often with extra zeroes) for a large variety of mixed consulting services. If you work for them, however, you won't see much of the actual hourly; most of it goes into various management fees. This is a common reason why consultants are disliked: They are seen as highly inefficient machines whose output is platitudes, bullshit and reports nobody reads.

    I personally like consulting quite a lot because I love solving unique issues for a large variety of people, more than I like solving the same problem over-and-over for the same employer. But that's since pushed me less into "consulting" and more into creating my own ventures.

    15 votes
  8. Comment on Is anyone here a consultant? I have questions... in ~life

    Adys
    Link
    There are two types of consultants: Consultancy firms, and independent consultants. You're in the latter case in this situation, we'll skip the former. A consultant is, in short, somebody who is...

    There are two types of consultants: Consultancy firms, and independent consultants. You're in the latter case in this situation, we'll skip the former.

    A consultant is, in short, somebody who is paid to advise on a matter of expertise. A lawyer will often be nothing more than a "Legal consultant", and an accountant is more often than not a "financial consultant". You pay for their time in giving their advice. That advice may be delivered over a simple phone call/zoom meeting, in-person directly, over an email, or in a 517 page report.

    Without more details as to what your matter of expertise actually is, it's difficult to say what your rate should be or what you even will be doing. But the point is, the company has identified you as a subject-matter expert, and wants you to advise them.

    Your price should probably simply start at what you are comfortable charging, for your own time, on an hourly basis. If the subject matter is highly niche, or locked behind expensive certifications, you can charge a high premium on that. There's plenty of ways to optimize this, but with zero prior experience as a consultant, it's going to be a waste of your time.

    I would respond something like:

    "Thank you for your offer. I am happy to make myself available on an advisory capacity on A, B and C. My hourly rate is $X."

    Where $X is probably something between $65 - $150. If in doubt, make it 100; it's a very good hourly rate, and it's probably not crazy for something a company would explicitly ask for advice for.. and they might just ask for 1 hour of your time anyway. I'm making loads of assumptions here of course.

    17 votes
  9. Comment on Alexei Navalny, galvanizing opposition leader and Vladimir Putin’s fiercest foe, died in prison, Russia says in ~news

    Adys
    Link
    A less reported part of this. Today was the Munich security conference where years ago Putin declared the west as his public enemy. Yulia Navalnaya was a speaker there. It’s not a coincidence he...

    A less reported part of this. Today was the Munich security conference where years ago Putin declared the west as his public enemy. Yulia Navalnaya was a speaker there. It’s not a coincidence he died today.

    https://youtu.be/8Kc4ZuyRAbc

    11 votes
  10. Comment on NGOs allowed to seize €2.9 million from Belgian government for failure to shelter asylum seekers in ~news

    Adys
    Link
    Context for those unfamiliar:

    Context for those unfamiliar:

    Fedasil (Federal Agency for the Reception of Asylum Seekers) is a Belgian institution that is responsible for the reception of asylum seekers. It operates under the supervision of the State Secretary for Asylum Policy.

    4 votes
  11. Comment on Over 5,000 games industry workers have already lost their jobs in 2024 in ~games

    Adys
    Link Parent
    Tech salaries are still going down. They will keep going down until they normalise with where they are really valued right now … which is to say, not very highly, given that there is a massive...

    Tech salaries are still going down. They will keep going down until they normalise with where they are really valued right now … which is to say, not very highly, given that there is a massive surplus in the sector.

    Teaching coding to a load of students, young people, plus the sector being overpaid for years has massively contributed to this. There’s a renormalisation that was waiting to happen and a downturn was always going to be a trigger for it.

    9 votes
  12. Comment on ‘Impossible’ to create AI tools like ChatGPT without copyrighted material, OpenAI says in ~tech

    Adys
    Link Parent
    You don’t get to GPT4 quality LLMs by having random works being donated. Words aren’t just fuel you put in the vehicle. Quality matters. Extensive, varied and well curated datasets is what’s...

    You don’t get to GPT4 quality LLMs by having random works being donated. Words aren’t just fuel you put in the vehicle.

    Quality matters. Extensive, varied and well curated datasets is what’s needed. A bunch of low quality fanfiction will not cut it.

    Furthermore it’s like looking at what’s been achieved by the internet in the past few decades and saying “Yep, let’s not make something amazing with all this — instead let’s ask people to redo it all for free”.

    OpenAI broke copyright. Yep absolutely. So did Spotify and Netflix. So did a LOT of other companies throughout the years. Companies providing useful services for the world, from entertainment to productivity.

    Is it ethical to profit from it the way they do? Absolutely not. Is it reasonable to ask them to build it under the current framework? No, it’s not reasonable either.

    All the framework is doing is preventing ethical people from building these amazing tools and leaving it only for those willing to break the rules. We need a different, sustainable system, not more people slaving their work into the public domain.

    11 votes
  13. Comment on ‘Impossible’ to create AI tools like ChatGPT without copyrighted material, OpenAI says in ~tech

    Adys
    Link Parent
    So that’s it. We’re locked in with only OpenAI being able to train things to the level they did. De facto monopoly only broken by china who doesn’t care about the ownership of bits on the internet.

    Seriously. OpenAI has a market cap of $80 billion.

    So that’s it. We’re locked in with only OpenAI being able to train things to the level they did. De facto monopoly only broken by china who doesn’t care about the ownership of bits on the internet.

    34 votes
  14. Comment on Introducing ChatGPT for teams in ~tech

  15. Comment on American Red Cross declares an emergency blood shortage, as number of donors hits twenty-year low in ~health

    Adys
    Link Parent
    Hydrate loads, eat fruits and veggies and make sure to not go on an empty stomach (but also don’t overfeed yourself; just eat a couple hours before). Stay in the chair a few minutes when you’re...

    Hydrate loads, eat fruits and veggies and make sure to not go on an empty stomach (but also don’t overfeed yourself; just eat a couple hours before). Stay in the chair a few minutes when you’re done and take it easy, if you feel lightheaded it’s normal. No physical exercise the same day (no sex either) and take it easy the day after as well.

    In general it’s no big deal once you’re used to it, especially if you’re a large or muscly guy you will barely feel it.

    Have fun! Donating is fun, my next one scheduled is next week.

    4 votes
  16. Comment on I'm about to start my first ever job as a Software Engineer. I'm terrified about losing it in a layoff. in ~tech

    Adys
    Link
    The tech climate sucks more for old workers than new ones right now. People are getting laid off en masse mainly because their position is being replaced by cheaper people. If you’re fresh blood...

    The tech climate sucks more for old workers than new ones right now.

    People are getting laid off en masse mainly because their position is being replaced by cheaper people. If you’re fresh blood you are the replacement not the original.

    Congratulations on the job - I hope it works out for you and you enjoy it. Don’t think about what you cannot control.

    33 votes
  17. Comment on There are two types of airport people : Some travelers love being late [2019] in ~travel

    Adys
    Link Parent
    I think that one day if this keeps up, we’ll head out separately because she misses her flight 🙃

    I think that one day if this keeps up, we’ll head out separately because she misses her flight 🙃

    5 votes