Algernon_Asimov's recent activity

  1. Comment on Do you have any quirks/idiosyncracies in how you use the English language? in ~talk

    Algernon_Asimov
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    I've been told off for my habit of writing "noone" as one word instead of two. For some reason, people can read "someone" without pronouncing it like "galleon", but they can't read "noone" without...

    I've been told off for my habit of writing "noone" as one word instead of two. For some reason, people can read "someone" without pronouncing it like "galleon", but they can't read "noone" without pronouncing it like "goon".

    3 votes
  2. Comment on Do you have any quirks/idiosyncracies in how you use the English language? in ~talk

    Algernon_Asimov
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    Why only the Greek gods? Why not all gods equally?

    and for variations on the Greek Gods' names (e.g. APÓLLŌ, HERMETICALLY sealed)*

    I'm a Pagan; it's a reverential thing

    Why only the Greek gods? Why not all gods equally?

    2 votes
  3. Comment on ‘Mulan’ to skip theaters for $30 rental (September 4th on the Disney Plus platform) in ~movies

    Algernon_Asimov
    Link Parent
    Yep. I was thinking something similar. On the plus side, at least you can pause the movie if you need to go to the toilet. And there's noone else around crinkling their lolly bags. But it still...

    At that point it's pretty much Gold Class/Lux pricing without the service

    Yep. I was thinking something similar.

    On the plus side, at least you can pause the movie if you need to go to the toilet. And there's noone else around crinkling their lolly bags.

    But it still falls far short of a cinema experience, and should be priced accordingly. Also, almost noone has a 15-metre movie screen at home.

    3 votes
  4. Comment on ‘Mulan’ to skip theaters for $30 rental (September 4th on the Disney Plus platform) in ~movies

    Algernon_Asimov
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    $30? I assume that's US dollars, so it's about $42 Australian dollars - which is equivalent to about 3 cinema tickets, give or take. And they're just providing the content. I'm providing the...

    while serving as a valuable test case to determine how much of their hard-earned cash they’re willing to part with in order to watch a movie that was originally intended to debut exclusively in cinemas.

    $30? I assume that's US dollars, so it's about $42 Australian dollars - which is equivalent to about 3 cinema tickets, give or take.

    And they're just providing the content. I'm providing the screen, the speakers, the seats, and the venue. All those overheads are removed for Disney.

    I expect a lower price.

    With sweeping battle scenes and lavishly appointed sets and costumes, Disney shelled out millions upon millions to make “Mulan” a must-see on the big screen. In fact, when Disney delayed “Mulan” for the third time in June, co-chairman and chief creative officer Alan Horn and co-chairman Alan Bergman highlighted the necessity to see the film in theaters.

    So, wait a year. It's not like the product will go off. It's a movie, It can last for years - up to 100 years, or so we've seen so far.

    The fact that they're not willing to hold off for a year to release this movie which needs to be seen in cinemas tells me they're desperate for cash. This isn't about a new business model, or delivering what fans want. Disney needs cashflow - simple as that.

    11 votes
  5. Comment on Racism in the USA is higher among white Christians than among the nonreligious. That's no coincidence in ~humanities

    Algernon_Asimov
    (edited )
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    The abolitionists were also able to rely on the Bible for their calls to abolish slavery in the USA (EDIT: And the UK). That's the beauty of the Bible: no matter what you believe in, you can find...

    The Bible itself has several passages supporting slavery.

    The abolitionists were also able to rely on the Bible for their calls to abolish slavery in the USA (EDIT: And the UK). That's the beauty of the Bible: no matter what you believe in, you can find something in that collection of writings to support your point of view.

    6 votes
  6. Comment on What gets you out of bed? in ~life

    Algernon_Asimov
    Link Parent
    I honestly don't know how to get into this career. When I was active in networking and attended various professional conferences, I heard from most of my fellow Business Analysts that they...

    I honestly don't know how to get into this career. When I was active in networking and attended various professional conferences, I heard from most of my fellow Business Analysts that they stumbled accidentally into the career, just like I did. They had that little bit "extra" or "different" talent which made problem-solving a bit easier for whatever project they were working on. They could see problems that noone else could see, they could imagine solutions that other people couldn't think of, they could connect with workers in a way that their colleagues couldn't - so they got dragged in to do that bit extra to help the project run smoother. A lot of them weren't called Business Analysts, but they were effectively doing that work because it made the projects better.

    Nearly 30 years ago, about the time I got sat in front of that PC and asked to work out what it could do for us, I used to think that there was a need for someone who could act as an "interpreter" between accounting nerds and computing geeks. I didn't know I was defining the career I would end up in, 15-20 years later!

    Most BAs I knew came to it from a programming background, while only a few of us came from a business background - but being a Business Analyst requires much more knowledge about working environments and business processes than about coding. It's helpful if a BA can read computer code, but they never need to write a single line of code. It's more helpful if a BA knows how businesses operate and how people work. But, because a lot of business analysis work is associated with projects that build or improve software, it was only natural that most BAs were ex-programmers.

    But that was a decade ago, and the career was still maturing. Just before I left the field, I heard of an Australian university that had started a Masters in Business Analysis - the first formal degree in Business Analysis in Australia. I suspect the career is now more mature, and the entry points better defined, than they were for me and my peers.

    FYI: @MimicSquid

    2 votes
  7. Comment on What gets you out of bed? in ~life

    Algernon_Asimov
    Link Parent
    "Business analysis is a research discipline of identifying business needs and determining solutions to business problems." "Business Analysis is the practice of enabling change in an...

    "Business analysis is a research discipline of identifying business needs and determining solutions to business problems."

    "Business Analysis is the practice of enabling change in an organizational context, by defining needs and recommending solutions that deliver value to stakeholders."

    Basically, someone in an organisation (whether that's a multinational corporation with 20,000 employees or a mid-sized company with 200 employees or a not-for-profit organsation with 20 volunteers) has a problem, and a Business Analyst is called in to:

    • a) investigate and identify the problem (often the real problem is not the same as the perceived problem);

    • b) research and suggest possible solutions;

    • c) assist in implementing the solution.

    It's all "analysis"; the "business" is just the environment in which the analysis is done. In the past, this job was also known as a systems analyst or a process analyst or even a data analyst; the titles have changed over the decades as the career became more mature, and people figured out the job is about more than just fixing computer software.

    I love it all: trouble-shooting, investigating, identifying the problem, researching solutions, implementing the chosen solution. One day, you're having a workshop with ten various workers, trying to find out what they think the problem is. Then you analyse the output of that workshop to figure out what the problem really is. The next day, you're diving into the guts of a computer system, trying to figure out what it actually does for the workers. Then you're analysing the difference between what the business and everyone in it needs in order to get their work done effectively and efficiently, and what the business and everyone in it is currently doing to get their work done - to work out what changes and solutions are needed to fill the gap ("gap analysis"). And so on.

    It's very intellectually challenging, and stimulating, and interesting.

    And it meets my need for achievement. I was making changes that improved people's working lives. My biggest achievement as a BA was to suggest, design, and help implement a software program which saved a company about $100,000 per month, and reduced the labour involved in those monthly processes by about 75%.

    I didn't choose the field. It chose me. I was doing this sort of work in various ways and at various companies since my early 20s. Back in the early 1990s, the corporate department I worked in was given a PC (all work was being done on mainframe terminals), and the manager of the department handed it over to me to look at, because I just knew how computers worked and I would be able to figure out what this brand-new tool which noone had ever seen before could do for us. Even when I worked in fast food, I ended up helping to design a better order-taking computer! I just kept getting drawn back to this kind of work; it followed me everywhere I went. But Business Analyst didn't exist as a career choice, and I wasn't aware of its predecessors like Systems Analyst and Data Analyst. It wasn't until I was recruited to help a software project as a subject matter expert, and saw a Business Analyst at work, that I realised this was the career I'd always been subconsciously been drawn to. I was 34 at the time.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on What gets you out of bed? in ~life

    Algernon_Asimov
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    If you want to get philosophical, I can't even prove that other people feel, let alone love! :P All I can do is observe behaviour; I can't attribute motives or emotions to that behaviour. For...

    If you want to get philosophical, I can't even prove that other people feel, let alone love! :P

    All I can do is observe behaviour; I can't attribute motives or emotions to that behaviour. For instance, I can't say that a mother who rushes into a burning building to save her baby is motivated by love or duty or a biological imperative or something else. I can't say that a man who proposes marriage to a woman is motivated by love or family pressure or societal expectations or something else. I can't say that a pet owner who takes care of their dog is motivated by love or obligation or self-interest or something else.

    However, I'm inclined to believe that people can love, without any expectation that the object of their affection will ever do something to earn that love. I've seen too much self-harming behaviour in the name of love (from making oneself miserable pining after someone who isn't available to the aforementioned rushing into a burning building) to think it's all just duty.

    So, yes, people can love. I'm not saying that all behaviour labelled as "love" is actually love. In fact, I believe a lot of behaviour that people call "love" is not actually love. But at least some of it is love.

    5 votes
  9. Comment on What gets you out of bed? in ~life

    Algernon_Asimov
    Link Parent
    Don't be sorry. I don't expect a dog - any dog - to provide "unconditional love". (Nor a cat - which I also have similar experience with.) I just think that people are projecting what they want to...

    Don't be sorry. I don't expect a dog - any dog - to provide "unconditional love". (Nor a cat - which I also have similar experience with.)

    I just think that people are projecting what they want to see onto their pets. The pets don't love their humans. They love what their humans do for them. And their humans interpret that as "unconditional love".

    I'm sure he still loves you though -- he looks to you for his care.

    That's kind of making my point for me! :P

    3 votes
  10. Comment on Today, in Brazil, I was hit by a car. I'm so grateful we have universal healthcare in ~talk

    Algernon_Asimov
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    It's good to know you're all patched up and on the road to recovery! It's a pity you can't remember how you had the accident. Or maybe that's a good thing? I had a similar healthcare experience a...

    It's good to know you're all patched up and on the road to recovery! It's a pity you can't remember how you had the accident. Or maybe that's a good thing?

    I had a similar healthcare experience a few years ago. I fell and fractured my elbow. My friend took me to hospital. I was admitted that night. I had X-rays and MRI scans. Two days later, I was operated on. After three days, I was released from hospital. And that all cost me zero dollars. I'm so grateful for Australia's Medicare healthcare system.

    8 votes
  11. Comment on What gets you out of bed? in ~life

    Algernon_Asimov
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    People keep saying this as if it's a truism, but I haven't observed it in the dog I live with and care for. I've been living with my housemate and his dog for over 3 years. In that time: I feed...

    but because dogs are the purest good love

    People keep saying this as if it's a truism, but I haven't observed it in the dog I live with and care for.

    I've been living with my housemate and his dog for over 3 years.

    In that time: I feed the dog about 12 out of 14 meals per week; I walk him just about every day (except when it's raining or too hot, but I even walk him when it's freezing outside); I throw his toy in the backyard a few times every day; I hose him down when it gets hot in Summer; I put his jacket on when it's cold at night; I give him treats (which I buy, not my housemate); and so on. Now that he's getting old, I even drive him to the park, so he can enjoy the park without getting worn out by the walk there & back.

    Meanwhile, my housemate feeds him 2 out of 14 times per week, accompanies us on our walks once a week, and... that's about it.

    I'm the one who points out when the dog is feeling bad. I'm the one who noticed when the dog was losing weight. I'm the one who spends time with the dog.

    As far as the dog is can see, I'm his primary caregiver. I've noticed he looks to me more than to my housemate, and he obeys me quicker than my housemate. In effect, after 3 years of caring for him and spending time with him, he has become my dog in all but name.

    And what do I get in return?

    I don't get cuddles. I don't get "kisses". I don't get company when I'm sad (I've tried). Every time I walk outside, all I get is his toy thrown at my feet for me to throw. That's it. He's not much different with my housemate - except that he doesn't throw the toy at my housemate (my housemate jokes that I'm the dog's "toy bitch").

    The dog doesn't love me, he loves what I do for him.

    5 votes
  12. Comment on What gets you out of bed? in ~life

    Algernon_Asimov
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    You can ask. I don't promise to answer. Maybe, if this going too off-topic for this thread, you should message me. (However, even in private, I don't promise to answer your questions.) To save you...

    You can ask. I don't promise to answer.

    Maybe, if this going too off-topic for this thread, you should message me. (However, even in private, I don't promise to answer your questions.)

    To save you some time: if it's the obvious question of why I don't work in my dream career any more, that's a question I won't answer.

    1 vote
  13. Comment on What gets you out of bed? in ~life

    Algernon_Asimov
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    The great tragedy of my life is that I found the work that fulfilled me and got to do it for a while, before it was then snatched away from me by circumstances beyond anyone's control. So now I...

    The great tragedy of my life is that I found the work that fulfilled me and got to do it for a while, before it was then snatched away from me by circumstances beyond anyone's control. So now I live with the memory of what it's like to have fulfilling and challenging work, and the knowledge that I can never do that work again.

    But, I didn't know what I wanted to be when I grew up until my mid-30s. It took that long for me to discover the career I'd been subconsciously looking for (the career also didn't really exist, except in embryonic form, when I was in my 20s). So maybe your dream job is still out there waiting for you to find it.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on What gets you out of bed? in ~life

    Algernon_Asimov
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    I would go back to Business Analysis. That was my dream career, which I had been unknowingly looking for all my life, before I finally found it in my mid-30s. I got to work in that career for...

    I would go back to Business Analysis. That was my dream career, which I had been unknowingly looking for all my life, before I finally found it in my mid-30s. I got to work in that career for about 7-8 years before my life changed and I couldn't any more.

    3 votes
  15. Comment on What gets you out of bed? in ~life

    Algernon_Asimov
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    Honestly? Routine. That's all that gets me out of bed in the mornings. "Here we go again." Each day has a different routine (Mondays are different to Thursdays, and so on), but the weeks are all...

    What gets you out of bed?

    Honestly? Routine. That's all that gets me out of bed in the mornings. "Here we go again." Each day has a different routine (Mondays are different to Thursdays, and so on), but the weeks are all the same as each other (every Monday is the same, and every Thursday is the same). They all blur into each other. Each week is like a super-long day, and every week is exactly the same.

    That, and the fact that it's more boring to stay in bed all day than to get up, where I'll at least have access to my computer, my television, and my books.

    My work isn't interesting at all. I had my annual performance review this week, and as I told my boss and my boss's boss, it's not an interesting job. But it is stable, which is what I need most at this point in my life. It's even survived the pandemic and the lockdowns.

    30 years ago, in an Organisational Behaviour subject in my university studies, I learned about one theory of motivation which said that people are generally motivated by one of these three factors: reward, achievement, recognition. I'm most motivated by achievement and least motivated by reward. I need to earn enough money to pay my bills but, beyond that, I don't really care about money. I'm more interested in making things and saying "I did that". However, my current job has minimal achievement possibilities. It's a routine job, which is pretty much the same thing, week after week after week after week. After 3 years, I'm bored. But I need a stable job, and I don't like change, and there are other circumstances which restrict my options, so I stay.

    My co-workers, while mostly nice people, really aren't my type of folks at all. I get along with them for work purposes, but I wouldn't go out of my way to spend time with them in a social situation.

    So I really have nothing to get up for, except for the fact that it's boring not to get up, work at least provides me with a distraction, and I need to work to earn money.

    10 votes
  16. Comment on What are three things you wanna do once the pandemic is over? in ~talk

    Algernon_Asimov
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    I happen to have some interest in the history of the English language, so I geek out about it occasionally. It's new to Tildes, but the concept itself was first studied back in 1957. It's called...

    Oh, okay. (You can tell this is not what I know about, right?)

    I happen to have some interest in the history of the English language, so I geek out about it occasionally.

    With that constraint lifted, socially active adults seem to be a large part of Tildes and the site's culture. Is that new?

    It's new to Tildes, but the concept itself was first studied back in 1957. It's called the technology adoption lifecycle. Social media is in the "late majority" stage, which means a wider variety of demographic groups - including your time-rich teenagers and socially active adults - are joining social media.

    But, teenagers were among the "early adopters" of Facebook. I joined Facebook nearly 11 years ago, as part of the "early majority". The teens were already there. In fact, over the next 5 years or so, as I and similar daggy middle-aged adults joined Facebook, the teenagers left because "OMG now my mom's on Facebook!!1! its not cool anymore!"

    Teenagers aren't new to social media. Most new social media platforms, from MySpace and Facebook to Instagram and TikTok were adopted by teenagers first, and adults followed.

    The innovators of social media platforms are the geeky, introverted people you talk about, but the teenagers came very soon after in almost every case.

    1 vote