BuckeyeSundae's recent activity

  1. Comment on What are some games in which movement itself is a joy? in ~games

    BuckeyeSundae
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    The Stanley Parable. To say much more than that is to ruin the experience.

    The Stanley Parable. To say much more than that is to ruin the experience.

    3 votes
  2. Comment on Ignoring bulk change commits with git blame in ~comp

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link
    Git maintenance seems like such a deep topic that I only have a small sliver of understanding for. Even if this feature was released in August, I don't feel like I've built up enough of an...

    Git maintenance seems like such a deep topic that I only have a small sliver of understanding for. Even if this feature was released in August, I don't feel like I've built up enough of an understanding of git for release notes to really help me much. Still, this was a neat little window into how to better use blame for debugging larger projects with more programmers in them. Thanks.

    4 votes
  3. Comment on Why doctors hate their computers in ~tech

    BuckeyeSundae
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    It's interesting. I don't work in healthcare, but I do a lot of work in what seems to be fairly similar industry (software security). I wonder how much overlap there is between your experiences...

    It's interesting. I don't work in healthcare, but I do a lot of work in what seems to be fairly similar industry (software security). I wonder how much overlap there is between your experiences and mine. We have been moving from a vastly more prescriptive initial implementation of a lot of these technologies to more of a user-augmented approach, where we try to be as out of the way as possible and design-flexible to the user's current needs. We have a similar userbase of overworked, strapped for time (and not always particularly technically sophisticated) users, where every minute and second counts. They have terrible technology scars from prior attempts at orchestration. They were promised that the technology (I, technically) provide would make their lives and jobs easier, often without the realization of that promise. And there are a lot of factors that drive that fraught dynamic:

    1. The software engineer/developer is too often too distant from the needs of the user (doctors, analysts, nurses, anyone who is intended to use the thing that's supposed to make their lives easier). - Basically this means that the concerns they hear about most often come from above (administration, compliance, and the people who pay the software developer's bills) than from those downstream of their content (the user).
    2. Most of us (software-side) are not particularly skilled project managers, and we're often tasked with doing complex project management, or given too little opportunity or room to figure out what might be a better path for user experience. This has a LOT of downwind impact, not the least of which being ...
    3. We're often not getting a good understanding of the actual needs of users in these industries before we release product increments, and how our content can make their lives easier. This restricts buy-in, especially from people who are strapped for time and working in what is effectively a constant state of emergency time management. The user doesn't have time to test, doesn't have time to engage in feedback, and often doesn't have incentive to believe they'll be heard if they do.
    4. The focus on "minimum viable product" often gets insufficient followup as the pressure becomes delivering "the next thing" without the time or investment in feedback. With how strapped the user usually is in the first place, this often means there is no feedback at all as to how the increment can be better, unless it actually breaks and is impossible to use (and sometimes not even then; the user will just try to work around the product rather than with it).
    5. Programmers generally are not often good about thinking about the whole design of the product all at once (a problem fed by not being particularly good at project management). Like, the design side should more often be thinking stuff along the lines of "if my product isn't perfect, how can I give the user the tools to do their job anyway" versus "my product will be fine. It's unit tested! Does exactly what it's intended to do. What's the problem?" We don't play well with failure. A lot of us are perfectionists (myself included).

    Does any of this resonate with you? It seems like Epic specifically is a toxic asshole of a company that intentionally makes product decisions in the way most suited to protect their ego, but even if they were trying to play nice I think there'd be a lot of very serious problems preventing a lot of industry buy in for these sorts of products.

    10 votes
  4. Comment on Everyone’s a socialist in a pandemic: Republicans want Medicare for all, but just for this one disease in ~misc

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    Oh absolutely. I'm not saying it's a particularly far ranging good quality to have as a people. But it's better than nothing!

    Oh absolutely. I'm not saying it's a particularly far ranging good quality to have as a people. But it's better than nothing!

    6 votes
  5. Comment on Everyone’s a socialist in a pandemic: Republicans want Medicare for all, but just for this one disease in ~misc

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link
    One thing that has been true about Republicans for literally decades is a strong sense of charity for those who suffer catastrophic, obviously unplannable disaster (it is one of the rare things...

    One thing that has been true about Republicans for literally decades is a strong sense of charity for those who suffer catastrophic, obviously unplannable disaster (it is one of the rare things that has broad consensus on the use of national power for with only weirdos like Ron Paul fighting it, usually even then only for other people's jurisdictions). Americans generally have been consistently united when it comes to giving to those hit by tornadoes, hurricanes, natural disasters, and in this case pandemics.

    So as much as things change, and as strange (and irresponsible) a leader as Trump is, it's striking to me how much some things stay consistent.

    12 votes
  6. Comment on The 2020 Endorsement Primary in ~misc

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    These days Biden represents a return to the optimism of the Obama years. Sanders represents a continuation and entrenchment of partisan politics. It's easy to forget that a lot of the reason for...

    These days Biden represents a return to the optimism of the Obama years. Sanders represents a continuation and entrenchment of partisan politics.

    It's easy to forget that a lot of the reason for Obama's initial success in 2008 breaking through the "juggernaut" that was Hillary's support came as a direct result of this exact same promise to transcend partisanship. Biden also has a long record of working with Republicans that he can point to for backing that hope up. He's had famously positive working relationships with people across the political spectrum, even as he's been fairly unwaiveringly liberal (though, obviously not as far to the left as Sanders, it's worth remembering that Biden is not really moderate in what he is proposing for a policy agenda for the next four years).

    People who like Sanders often will say that this doesn't make a convincing case, which for them is true. These are the type of voters who know that what they want is so far away that they have to fight loudly and hard to get it, because most voters don't agree with them on many of their most valued policy priorities. But it's more than enough for a lot of voters, and that's why you get a lot of people supporting Biden. They know Biden. Like Algernon is pointing out. Biden is safe. He is a return to a more sane political environment, where the average liberal voter can trust in their government officials again, rather than having to live in a constant state of fear and paranoia because ohgodwhatisthatorangemandoingtoday.

    "Normal" isn't a word we've been able to say for a while now about our politics. Don't underestimate voter fatigue. Many people will do a lot of things just to get someone in power they can trust and don't have to constantly watch every fucking moment of the day or else there will be another human rights tragedy on the border.

    6 votes
  7. Comment on Deployed a complete rework of the permissions system - please let me know if you notice anything strange in ~tildes.official

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    You're all so fast. Here I was just dropping by to say "I know this feeling; refactoring code is about half of what I do."

    You're all so fast. Here I was just dropping by to say "I know this feeling; refactoring code is about half of what I do."

    5 votes
  8. Comment on <deleted topic> in ~misc

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    The trouble with this theory is that if Trump truly didn't want to be President, all he would have to do is ... resign. No one is forcing him to do something he doesn't want to do. He chooses to...

    The trouble with this theory is that if Trump truly didn't want to be President, all he would have to do is ... resign. No one is forcing him to do something he doesn't want to do. He chooses to continue to do so. I can only surmise that, like a lot of what he says in social media and along the lines of a bunch of reporting about Trump's thinking from within the Oval Office, he sees himself as genuinely the representative for his fiercest supporters, and what they love about him is his himselfness (i.e., his ego and inability to admit fault).

    I think he wanted and still wants to be president. He has always struck me as the sort of guy who eats the shit he peddles to others about himself. He thinks he is the greatest, with the best mind, the best words, whatever. He thinks has the best, healthiest body, no matter how obviously wrong that is to just about any other observer. And anyone who doesn't agree with him is not likely to stay long in his administration, especially these days.

    But more problematic is that this theory would have Trump (probably falsely) hold a role similar to Cincinnatus, which was the model Washington used to justify his stepping down after a measly 8 years in office. This mythological Roman figure was (and I would say still is) so important to the American understanding of propriety that we named a damn city after him, and any time a politician can appear to be working in the same mold, it is sure to get some following. Not only do I not think this applies to Trump (he is pretty obviously egomaniacal at minimum), but I think trying to apply it to Trump is tactically helpful to Trump and his supporters.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on <deleted topic> in ~misc

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link
    CNN likes its drama. Not sure this article is particularly good commentary. The question I start off with, which undermines Cillizza's main point, is whether Trump regularly defends Sanders at...

    CNN likes its drama.

    Not sure this article is particularly good commentary. The question I start off with, which undermines Cillizza's main point, is whether Trump regularly defends Sanders at all. Especially since he's trying to insult the guy in the main example Cillizza brings up, while "defending" him.

    Look, it's to Trump's benefit if Democrats end this primary cycle with more deep loathing for one another because people who are alienated enough from the party might become Trump supporters (or, just as well, not vote at all). It's not too hard to figure out. Russia's strategy is about the same if you're paying attention (support candidates in a way that enhances division and partisanship; the more at odds americans are with each other, the less they will likely think about Russia at all).

    7 votes
  10. Comment on Why six hours of sleep is as bad as none at all in ~health

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    Reminds me of this post on sleep from a while back. It was a blog post thoroughly reviewing a book that was attempting to overview studies like the one referenced in the article here.

    Reminds me of this post on sleep from a while back. It was a blog post thoroughly reviewing a book that was attempting to overview studies like the one referenced in the article here.

    3 votes
  11. Comment on Discord is not an acceptable choice for free software projects in ~comp

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    There's really not much getting around the fact that what Discord offers is a flexible means to have the old IRC community feel with modern VOIP and video chats (if that's your thing), for free to...

    There's really not much getting around the fact that what Discord offers is a flexible means to have the old IRC community feel with modern VOIP and video chats (if that's your thing), for free to all but those who opt into a subscription service. So long as we're all about the free and see any subscription-only service as too high a barrier to entry to stomach, it's highly unlikely anyone else can get the venture capital/infrastructure capital required to set up a reasonable alternative to Discord.

    Why is it that discord has kind of scummy personal data practices? Because it's how they pay the bills. It's the same with Facebook. Unless and until you find a way to pay the bills that people are willing to opt into, you're gonna struggle.

    8 votes
  12. Comment on Andrew Yang drops out of presidential race in ~news

  13. Comment on Andrew Yang drops out of presidential race in ~news

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    I think much of the importance placed on the first few moments that voters get to have a say is because just about everyone is terrified of a "contested primary" result because, well, it would be...

    I think much of the importance placed on the first few moments that voters get to have a say is because just about everyone is terrified of a "contested primary" result because, well, it would be awful for Dems and likely divisive in its result.

    The trouble in my view seems to be much more that Dems, nor republicans, have figured out a way to make a primary system allow for multiple participants and not lead inexorably to factional candidates vying for different constituent groups among the whole, who then potentially struggle to earn the legitimacy of the whole due to their having achieved success through largely factional means. More simply, the more candidates you have, the harder it is to arrive at the end goal of a primary system: the candidate with the most overall support from its party membership. So a lot of this funneling is even desired by the party because, like the voters, they fear a contested primary for its potentially permanently divisive result.

    6 votes
  14. Comment on Joe Biden's campaign has released an ad attacking Pete Buttigieg's record and experience in ~misc

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    Yeah, and the tonal difference between the music choices between each segment was also a little much for me. It's also worth noting that not all of the "accomplishments" being said of Pete were...

    Yeah, and the tonal difference between the music choices between each segment was also a little much for me. It's also worth noting that not all of the "accomplishments" being said of Pete were all that great. The last two "accomplishments" in particular are notable reasons why people of color may be a bit reluctant to hop on Team Buttigieg, rather than things that Pete himself has claimed pride in doing. So even on that front, I don't see these as true comparisons. These are a list of Biden's proudest accomplishments, as well as two things a generic small city mayor could be proud of and a couple things they may not be so proud of.

    4 votes
  15. Comment on Joe Biden's campaign has released an ad attacking Pete Buttigieg's record and experience in ~misc

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    And, just as importantly, Biden is campaigning on his own record too.

    And, just as importantly, Biden is campaigning on his own record too.

    1 vote
  16. Comment on Joe Biden's campaign has released an ad attacking Pete Buttigieg's record and experience in ~misc

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    Yep, and even Obama had more track record than Buttigeig, with 7 years in the state legislature and then another 4 in the US Senate.

    Yep, and even Obama had more track record than Buttigeig, with 7 years in the state legislature and then another 4 in the US Senate.

    2 votes
  17. Comment on Joe Biden's campaign has released an ad attacking Pete Buttigieg's record and experience in ~misc

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    I think the idea is something along the lines that Buttigeig doesn't have much of a record at all, not just on national policy but in total. If all you can point to are successes while being mayor...

    I think the idea is something along the lines that Buttigeig doesn't have much of a record at all, not just on national policy but in total. If all you can point to are successes while being mayor of a small* city for eight years (there's only 100k or so inside the city, and only 310k in the metro area; you're really stretching things to say he's in charge of a city of 700k people, which would be the entire statistical area that includes a lot of land he isn't mayor of--Mishawaka in particular) ...

    I think it's a perfectly valid point to say that eight years of being major of a small city might not be enough to prepare you for the scale of what's involved at the national level. Maybe it isn't the most important thing for everyone's vote (we're all bad at scale), but surely it's important to enough people to be worth commenting on.

    12 votes
  18. Comment on Recruiting for a panel for an LGBT-focused Q&A session on Tildes in ~lgbt

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link Parent
    I would say it's also awkward to get name dropped if you're not expecting it. In my experience, a lot of people assume they won't be so remarkable as to be remembered--even when they are. I don't...

    I would say it's also awkward to get name dropped if you're not expecting it. In my experience, a lot of people assume they won't be so remarkable as to be remembered--even when they are.

    I don't think I saw the exchange being referenced here, but I thought I would speak up sympathy for you're feeling a bit put out. I'm a gay man too, and one reason I don't say it as often as I might is because I'm not looking for the conversation that often comes from admitting as much. That isn't to say you're a bad person for being among friends who would ask me questions, it's just that I don't always have the energy for that and so I choose when it's best for me to talk about that stuff. If you choose the same moments I choose, then we're golden. It's only when you choose other moments that I might react poorly, which (again) is not your fault! Just a mismatch of emotional energy to your good natured interest.

    6 votes
  19. Comment on Too Many of America’s Smartest Waste Their Talents in ~finance

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link
    I think it's a heuristic that many people associate going to Harvard and Yale (or Standford) with smarts. Intelligence is not the same as dedication or family connections. I know from experience...

    I think it's a heuristic that many people associate going to Harvard and Yale (or Standford) with smarts. Intelligence is not the same as dedication or family connections. I know from experience that the smartest students are not always the most driven, but the most driven are always among the disproportionately likely to apply for top tier schools.

    And doesn't that cast the problem in a different light? If you assume what I said just now is true, isn't it a different problem that the most driven students generally (or at least disproportionately) see Finance as the best avenue for personal success? And doesn't it force you to have to wrestle for better metrics to determine what the "smartest" students are doing?

    5 votes
  20. Comment on Dark Energy may be an illusion: Gravitons themselves may have mass in ~space

    BuckeyeSundae
    Link
    I want every journalist who covers any scientific anything to pay into science education funds for every instance of the phrase "just a theory" that comes up in their writing. I don't care how...

    I want every journalist who covers any scientific anything to pay into science education funds for every instance of the phrase "just a theory" that comes up in their writing. I don't care how much they pay. I just care that they pay.

    11 votes