ClearlyAlive's recent activity

  1. Comment on iPad recommendations in ~tech

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    Should point out for base model, under no circumstances should you get the 32 GB version.

    Should point out for base model, under no circumstances should you get the 32 GB version.

  2. Comment on Top Canadian museum to be imminently gutted in the name of 'decolonization' in ~humanities

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    Honestly the main article is pretty misleading about it.

    The facades, staging and display cases of the exhibits need to be modernized. When the galleries on the third floor were built over 50 years ago, materials were used that do not meet today’s standards. They contain hazardous materials such as asbestos and lead. In normal operations these materials do no provide any risk to visitors or staff, but with the modernizing and changing of the spaces, these materials could be disturbed which requires us to take proper precautions and ensure everything is modernized and up to current standards.

    Honestly the main article is pretty misleading about it.

    9 votes
  3. Comment on Does the Internet feel American centric to you? in ~talk

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    I think there is one thing that isn’t being considered here. English orthography is a lot harder than Portuguese orthography. A study which asked children to write words after their first year of...

    I think there is one thing that isn’t being considered here. English orthography is a lot harder than Portuguese orthography. A study which asked children to write words after their first year of school showed an average error rate of 25 % for Portuguese, but more than 70 % for English. With this type of difficulty, it’s no wonder English speakers don’t manage to learn the language at the same level as other languages. I think culturally, anglophones address the issue by simply not caring as much for spelling, unlike Portuguese or in my case, French. Getting corrected here and there is one thing, but I think a significant minority in English would otherwise suffer constant corrections, and all of this to no real benefit.

    3 votes
  4. Comment on What's something that you feel is unfairly criticized? in ~talk

    ClearlyAlive
    Link
    French spelling. It's not as phonetic as other languages, but it's a godsend compared to English. It's true that in French we don't always pronounce every letter, but unlike English, French has...

    French spelling. It's not as phonetic as other languages, but it's a godsend compared to English. It's true that in French we don't always pronounce every letter, but unlike English, French has some generally clear rules and conventions on how we pronounce words. French dictionaries tend not to feature IPA guides for words, unlike in English because of this.

    5 votes
  5. Comment on A friendly reminder: If you own a bicycle, you must own a helmet in ~hobbies

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    I’m generally against any strong advocacy of helmets because it discourages cycling. According to the federal office for territorial development bicyclists save 3,7 centimes for every kilomètre...

    I’m generally against any strong advocacy of helmets because it discourages cycling. According to the federal office for territorial development bicyclists save 3,7 centimes for every kilomètre they cycle, this is a very high societal benefit and every fewer cyclist means society is losing out on at least 10 centimes per kilometre (assuming the take the bus instead; more for a car). With such great benefits on the line, we really should not make cycling appear less safe or accessible by mandating helmets.

    4 votes
  6. Comment on <deleted topic> in ~talk

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    So you use quite, quite too much?

    So you use quite, quite too much?

    2 votes
  7. Comment on Denmark is a liberal paradise for many people, but the reality is very different for immigrants in ~life

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    I agree that ghettos are undesirable but I think the current classification system is simply unacceptable and unnecessary. I don’t see why they couldn’t just base it on if you’re an immigrant or a...

    I agree that ghettos are undesirable but I think the current classification system is simply unacceptable and unnecessary. I don’t see why they couldn’t just base it on if you’re an immigrant or a second génération native as other countries do.

    In terms of the UK, while I don’t really have any first-hand experience, I learnt in school that there were also Polish/EE enclaves as well; I don’t see why these are any better than the Asian ghettos and I think mixing the populations would be better in both cases.

    1 vote
  8. Comment on Denmark is a liberal paradise for many people, but the reality is very different for immigrants in ~life

    ClearlyAlive
    Link
    This descendants of immigrants classification is completely crazy and goes counter to the naturalisation process. If I, as an immigrant who naturalises, is still treated differently than...

    This descendants of immigrants classification is completely crazy and goes counter to the naturalisation process. If I, as an immigrant who naturalises, is still treated differently than "first-class citizens", what even is the point? No matter the amount of assimilation, it treats me differently. I agree with the example in the article, it goes against the recognition of "equality of people".

    12 votes
  9. Comment on Google Play Music will shut down later this year - features are now available for transferring history/library to YouTube Music in ~music

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    Can't you do that on Amazon?

    Would anyone be able to suggest a service where I can buy albums from artists that isn't iTunes?

    Can't you do that on Amazon?

    1 vote
  10. Comment on What are you reading these days? in ~books

    ClearlyAlive
    Link
    On Intelligence by Jeff Hawkins. I’m really enjoying it, and it’s doing a good job of rebutting a lot of the GOFAI beliefs. I also like the model of intelligence it proposes.

    On Intelligence by Jeff Hawkins. I’m really enjoying it, and it’s doing a good job of rebutting a lot of the GOFAI beliefs. I also like the model of intelligence it proposes.

    1 vote
  11. Comment on Sanders says another presidential run is 'very, very unlikely' in ~news

    ClearlyAlive
    Link
    I’m sad, but I kinda already knew this 😭.

    I’m sad, but I kinda already knew this 😭.

    2 votes
  12. Comment on May 13th, 1985: The day Philadelphia police bombed a city street, leaving 250 homeless and eleven dead, including five children in ~humanities

    ClearlyAlive
    Link
    As far as I’m concerned, the catchphrase should be “No forgiveness before prosecution”. There is no way I would be willing to offer any party forgiveness without them being investigated and...

    As far as I’m concerned, the catchphrase should be “No forgiveness before prosecution”. There is no way I would be willing to offer any party forgiveness without them being investigated and prosecuted.

    6 votes
  13. Comment on I’m a developer. I won’t teach my kids to code, and neither should you in ~comp

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    Definitely, I just think that will become easier because you'll already understand what the program is doing so when learning the new language you can focus on syntax more since you already...

    The only problem I see with with learning lisp, even if it's "easier" syntactically, is that you will eventually have to learn the Fortran-C (imperative?) family of language syntax anyways.

    Definitely, I just think that will become easier because you'll already understand what the program is doing so when learning the new language you can focus on syntax more since you already understand the basic programming concepts.

    In the status quo, people are forced to learn both programming concepts (conditions, loops etc) at the same time as the syntax which can really frustrate people. I agree with the author that the syntax is not really that important to learn as the underlying skills are.

    FYI While Scheme is focused on being functional, Common Lisp and other dialects are multi-paradigm and indeed CL is very imperative.

    So you are just delaying the necessary struggle with syntax for another point down the road. Does learning lisp really ease that?

    My experience has been that my second programming language was much easier than my first because I understood all the concepts and I was mostly just learning a new syntax (and some extra features/difficulties in the case of JS). In terms of helping my friend with learning Java, she doesn't exactly get what each part does as well as the syntax.

    A data scientist needs to know how to manipulate their data with modern tools, which will inevitably use a modern and widespread language.

    The issue I have with this is that it's difficult to predict which language will actually be modern and in use in the future. I'm sure Fortran isn't and so focusing on a specific language won't be that useful as paradigms change very rapidly; indeed, today we're seeing a move to the functional paradigm of programming. That's why I'm very focused on the teaching of programming concepts such as looping, conditions, variables.

    They don't necessarily need a low level understanding of what the machine is doing

    I'm not promoting an assembly or C level understanding of the what the machine is doing, but I think there are some skills you need to program computers that are independent of programming language that we can teach them.

    4 votes
  14. Comment on Should x < $foo < y read from $foo once or twice? Perl debates in ~comp

    ClearlyAlive
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I’ve had a look yes. My view is primarily based on what the user knows and expects. In the user’s conception of the language tied variables have the following axiom: Everytime a tied variable is...

    Have you read through the issue?

    I’ve had a look yes.

    So it probably isn't something a beginner would touch.

    My view is primarily based on what the user knows and expects. In the user’s conception of the language tied variables have the following axiom:

    1. Everytime a tied variable is used it may mutate.

    The problem with the fetching twice is that it seems violates that axiom in the user's conception.

    Also note that since it ends up as something like $x < $y && $y < $z (if everything is a scalar, that is), I'm guessing that $z won't be fetched if the left side is false. So with that in mind, it makes sense that $y should possibly be fetched twice, right?

    Of course, technically it doesn't as you rightly point out. But this misses the UX issue in terms of how people read code. People will translate the above axiom into the following:

    1. Everytime a tied variable appears it may mutate.

    in their brains. That way whenever reading code they can see easily see how tied variables are changing. The current behaviour clearly violates that axiom and makes reading code harder. It's true, as developers we can expect them to be more aware of implementation details as compared to end-users, but still I think that because of how trivial the solution is: { temp = $y; $x < temp && temp < $z} we should change it to better suit these axioms.

    In general I believe that developers and users shouldn't need to worry about the underlying representation unless they really need to (e.g. speed optimisations), this doesn't strike me as one of those cases.

    1 vote
  15. Comment on I’m a developer. I won’t teach my kids to code, and neither should you in ~comp

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    Do you agree with my analysis on which programming language to learn? Most of my points aren’t super controversial but I thought that one might be.

    Do you agree with my analysis on which programming language to learn? Most of my points aren’t super controversial but I thought that one might be.

    1 vote
  16. Comment on I’m a developer. I won’t teach my kids to code, and neither should you in ~comp

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    When I said this I meant “computation”. I think because more and more things in our democracies are shifting to being computerised people need to understand how computation works to avoid treating...

    How is it important to know how computers work?

    When I said this I meant “computation”. I think because more and more things in our democracies are shifting to being computerised people need to understand how computation works to avoid treating them as infallible, or also being unnecessarily distrustful.

    Additionally, will learning basic Python really teach you much about how they work?

    I mean I’ve already mentioned I’m against teaching Python but I do think learning how software is made will give children a better idea of computation. Remember we’re talking about children here, I don’t think dry class discussions will really engage them that much; this is why we do science labs in school.

    4 votes
  17. Comment on I’m a developer. I won’t teach my kids to code, and neither should you in ~comp

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    The same is true of Art or Science (noöne needs to do a science lab), but just like painting or a science lab, coding is more fun. When I say “how computers work”, I don’t mean just the physical...

    It’s quite possible to have a general understanding of how computers work without ever writing a single line of code.

    The same is true of Art or Science (noöne needs to do a science lab), but just like painting or a science lab, coding is more fun.

    Just ask the thousands of gamers that plan, purchase and assemble their desktop computers every year.

    When I say “how computers work”, I don’t mean just the physical hardware, I also mean the software, the programs, the algorithms.

    And yeah, I suppose programming might help problem solving overall, but it’s certainly not the only resource.

    No of course not, but we try to teach children these skills with a variety of sources.

    Also see my edit.

    5 votes
  18. Comment on I’m a developer. I won’t teach my kids to code, and neither should you in ~comp

    ClearlyAlive
    (edited )
    Link
    I see a lot of pushback against teaching people to code because not everyone will (need to) be a software developer, but I feel this fundamentally misses the point. Not everyone will be a...

    I see a lot of pushback against teaching people to code because not everyone will (need to) be a software developer, but I feel this fundamentally misses the point. Not everyone will be a scientist, but we all still learn science in school because it's important to know how our world works; similarly, due to the reliance on computers, I think knowing programming is important because it enables one to understand how our computers work.

    It's true that most programs a child will write will not be reliable or efficient, but many times that simply isn't important even in the professional world (i.e. simply scripting). As an analogy, the author could be complaining about children learning Art, they won't paint breathtaking, technically rich paintings, but that's fine, the important thing is that children are creating.

    In this article the author specifically pushes back at the notion that learning syntax is not the key element of being a programmer. I mostly agree with this position, which is why I believe that most people should learn Lisp before due to the vastly simpler syntax. Compared to languages like Java or Python I make far fewer syntax errors when writing Lisp. I have a friend who tried to learn python but really struggled with it, but took to Lisp very quickly because of how simple the syntax is; indeed, right now they're learning Java as part of a Uni module and finding it very frustrating[0].
    For her, the fundamental issue (I think) is that she's essentially required to do two things, learn programming and learning the syntax. Lisp saves us from the syntax.

    [0]: Clarification: She only did around Lisp for a few days before uni started which is why she didn't manage to learn much to help her with Java.

    ETA: Another point I should make is that the necessity of basic coding skills has significantly increased among professions. All STEM students need to know how to code (for things like data analysis), but nowadays many people outside STEM also require the same skills such as the humanities (statistical analysis) or journalism (I was friends with a journalist who had to learn some Web dev skills). For those people having a small foundation in school probably would be helpful, just like we teach people some science or newspaper writing in school.

    I think schools should teach people enough programming skills that they are able to make medium level Siri Shortcuts.

    Were we to have such a course in schools, I’d like it to include a module on the physical design of computers and their components, formal logic, Boolean algebra in addition to simply programming. Ideally it would be joint between science and mathematics so formal logic and Boolean algebra is first studied in mathematics.

    18 votes
  19. Comment on Should x < $foo < y read from $foo once or twice? Perl debates in ~comp

    ClearlyAlive
    Link
    Obviously once. If I as the user wanted to insist on twice I’d write it twice.

    Obviously once. If I as the user wanted to insist on twice I’d write it twice.

    1 vote
  20. Comment on Programming Languages that are Both Interpretable and Compilable? in ~comp

    ClearlyAlive
    Link Parent
    Why is SBCL “clumsy”? Is it due to the lack of built in in readline? I think most people use SBCL or another lisp through SLIME or SLY so don’t really need to worry about the lack of readline as...

    Why is SBCL “clumsy”? Is it due to the lack of built in in readline?

    I think most people use SBCL or another lisp through SLIME or SLY so don’t really need to worry about the lack of readline as SLIME offers it.

    1 vote