Cycloneblaze's recent activity

  1. Comment on Stadia is shutting down in ~games

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    Seems you're right! I had a mistaken impression then - I think I was thinking of Artefact which cost money to buy but also ongoing costs to buy new card packs. I think it still put me off but hey,...

    Seems you're right! I had a mistaken impression then - I think I was thinking of Artefact which cost money to buy but also ongoing costs to buy new card packs. I think it still put me off but hey, that's on me for not being informed.

    3 votes
  2. Comment on Stadia is shutting down in ~games

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    I think the pricing model (pay for a subscription and then also buy the games) put a lot of people off, myself included, who might otherwise have given it a try. But they never changed that -...

    I think the pricing model (pay for a subscription and then also buy the games) put a lot of people off, myself included, who might otherwise have given it a try. But they never changed that - despite that they were just ploughing money into the service to get the games and will also be spending untold millions on refunds now.

    But also, many of the people who might have been early adopters were certainly warned away by Google's history of killing products. I don't think anybody assumed this (pretty laudable) refund scheme would be in place when Stadia did die (and for many it was a when), so they'd just have sunk a bunch of money into something they did not own and would lose after not too long. Stadia was a victim of Google's reputation before it even launched, so, maybe Google should have seen this coming! I vainly hope that this will get it through to them: when your business is running services, not releasing products, people need to be able to trust that you will actually keep offering the service, otherwise you may as well not launch it.

    7 votes
  3. Comment on America’s self-obsession is killing its democracy in ~humanities

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    I think in its current form the federal structure of the United States is more of a drag on its ability to serve its people than a legitimate defence of theirs against tyrannical government. While...

    I think in its current form the federal structure of the United States is more of a drag on its ability to serve its people than a legitimate defence of theirs against tyrannical government. While in the 1700s states may have been distant enough (in terms of travel time but also information spread and therefore politics) that balancing them against each other in a federal system made sense, today the US is very homogenised, but the federal system vastly limits its ability to express that, and more importantly, the ability for the national government to actually govern in a national way. States end up being a barrier between people and democratic government. Are the people in Texas really that different from Californians that they need to have their own additional sovereign governments?

    I also tend to think that this applies to other countries with federal governments - in general federalism seems to tie together groups who would rather not be united, or it puts a layer of bureaucracy and abstraction between people who have no reason to be divided so. Local government is important, but removing policy areas from the national government which would be better managed there ain't it.

    5 votes
  4. Comment on What's changed here on tildes? in ~talk

  5. Comment on Creators are mitigating burnout with longform YouTube videos in ~tech

    Cycloneblaze
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    An article giving a look into what some video essayists think about the rise in popularity of their format.

    An article giving a look into what some video essayists think about the rise in popularity of their format.

    Nicholson, who attended VidCon as a Featured Creator, noted the demand for longer, nostalgic content during a panel featuring pop culture commentary YouTubers.

    Despite doing the complete opposite of what industry experts and many established creators recommended, like posting frequently to engage with viewers, Nicholson's church play video was viewed more than a million times in the few days since she posted it. She and other creators who specialize in documentary-style deep dives, pop culture analyses and video essay takes have carved out a niche of viewers who demand quality over frequency.

    5 votes
  6. Comment on Introducing the Himitsu keyring & password manager for Unix in ~comp

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    This is apparently used for an optional key, like a comment. Personally I think the exclamation point conveys importance and caution well enough while being simple. Maybe you could put it before...

    How about using a question mark instead?

    This is apparently used for an optional key, like a comment. Personally I think the exclamation point conveys importance and caution well enough while being simple. Maybe you could put it before the key name?

    4 votes
  7. Comment on Broadcom announces plans to buy VMware in $61 billion deal in ~tech

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    Anecdotally, I've heard of people who work at VMware polishing up their resumes after hearing this news.

    Anecdotally, I've heard of people who work at VMware polishing up their resumes after hearing this news.

    4 votes
  8. Comment on Leaked draft opinion show the Supreme Court has voted to overturn abortion rights in ~news

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    It really is an incredibly weak and unfounded distinction to draw. The legal analysis, the weapon that has been constructed here with which to destroy Roe, is equally applicable to all those other...

    they are listing the cases used to justify the autonomy that provided the legal framework for Roe v Wade and saying they are not applicable because there is no "critical moral question" regarding "potential life" involved in those.

    It really is an incredibly weak and unfounded distinction to draw. The legal analysis, the weapon that has been constructed here with which to destroy Roe, is equally applicable to all those other rights. Except that abortion is special somehow. Why? Doesn't go into it. You can have all these rights that are supposedly unsupported by the Constitution, apparently, unless babies are being killed. It doesn't make sense on any level!

    One level that I wonder about though is that it seems very much in line with the GOP agenda to take down the rights to gay marriage and contraceptives and so on. And the right to privacy more broadly, in terms of the freedom to make choices about your personal life without government interference. I can see the conservative justices not wanting to repeal all of those rights now in the same decision, which is probably why they've erected this unfounded barrier between them and the right to abortion, but presumably they do want to repeal them later at some point, when an appropriate case comes up. As much of a non-sequitur as this distinction is, if they adhere to it, I can't see a way around it. So why do it? Have they just painted themselves into a corner here and are lazily deciding to deal with it later?

    9 votes
  9. Comment on Leaked draft opinion show the Supreme Court has voted to overturn abortion rights in ~news

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    This problem seems like a very minor consideration next to the fact of the Court having seemingly been worked into an assembly line to deliver fringe right-wing legal opinions in service of...

    However, note that I did state “within” the court, i.e., the justices, clerks, and staff won’t trust each other to protect the confidentiality of court proceedings.

    This problem seems like a very minor consideration next to the fact of the Court having seemingly been worked into an assembly line to deliver fringe right-wing legal opinions in service of regressive causes.

    Like, so what if the staff and Justices of the Court work together less effectively on foot of this leak? If anything it might be a good thing. It certainly can't make the defence of progressive ideals in the Court any less effective. That's what should be focused on here, not whether legal ethics are being flaunted.

    9 votes
  10. Comment on I think I might be starting to freak out a bit here in ~talk

    Cycloneblaze
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    It sounds like you're panicking some. I definitely recognise the overthinking, racing thoughts, anxiety about my body and health, hyperawareness of how I feel... all that. And I definitely had...

    It sounds like you're panicking some. I definitely recognise the overthinking, racing thoughts, anxiety about my body and health, hyperawareness of how I feel... all that. And I definitely had some anxious nights specifically about COVID, earlier in the pandemic. So for one I'd say you're not being unreasonable - panic is an unpleasant reaction, but it's not an abnormal one.

    The acute worry it sounds like you're feeling right now will pass. It would help if you have a friend or family member you can talk to, just to talk you through what you're feeling and let your emotions out a bit. It's also a good way to distract yourself. If not, hopefully this thread can fill that purpose a bit.

    One other thing that helped me about COVID specifically was, as someone told me, you're playing the odds. The odds of actually contracting COVID right now are high (as you'll know, having now got it), but the odds of it making you severely ill are low, especially since you are young, healthy and vaccinated. Remember, even as you've got the disease, you've already rendered it less harmful to you. If you can put that risk into perspective, you can hopefully see that it's still quite far from you. Your chances are very good in this game.

    I can't speak to how common it is to get the symptoms of loss of taste and smell from the current COVID variants in Europe, so I can't tell you that it's normal or not. The best thing for you to do there is to call your doctor and ask them for advice. They will be able to know your symptoms better than we would, and they will have seen a lot of patients with COVID recently, so they should have a good idea of how common such symptoms are right now.

    I hope these thoughts help some! Feel better soon.

    8 votes
  11. Comment on Believe it or not, men who can’t tell the difference between attraction and connection are not unusual in ~life

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    It's a lot easier to answer "does this happen" than "why does this happen".

    It's a lot easier to answer "does this happen" than "why does this happen".

    4 votes
  12. Comment on Megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - March 28-29 in ~news

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    Thanks for going straight to the source like I didn't! That is significant protection, and I think to go further than that (giving Russian equal status to Ukrainian, for example) would be somewhat...

    Thanks for going straight to the source like I didn't! That is significant protection, and I think to go further than that (giving Russian equal status to Ukrainian, for example) would be somewhat of a cultural capitulation to Putin. Better than giving up land or people, though.

    3 votes
  13. Comment on Megathread for news/updates/discussion of Russian invasion of Ukraine - March 28-29 in ~news

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    A question for closer observers than I, would it not be a good idea for Ukraine to give Russia this one? There's already a significant Russian-speaking minority of Ukrainians in the country, such...

    legal protection for the Russian language in Ukraine

    A question for closer observers than I, would it not be a good idea for Ukraine to give Russia this one? There's already a significant Russian-speaking minority of Ukrainians in the country, such as in cities like Kharkiv, presumably many of them are not separatists. It's in line with what many other European countries do as well (admittedly I'm not very clear on how many Eastern European countries do this). It could be a sop to Russia that mollifies their demands for other things like demilitarisation, without actually hurting Ukraine much or at all. Or would it hurt them?

    4 votes
  14. Comment on The end of the nice gtk button in ~tech

    Cycloneblaze
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    Kind of off-topic, but this is a really tiresome sentiment. Of course one is allowed to have opinions - the author is clear that they have been making themselves heard repeatedly. Other people...

    Now one of the worst parts is that everywhere I only even hint at not completely loving the new libadwaita theme I instantly get shut down and disagreed with before I can even get the chance to give some feedback. Apparently not liking flat themes makes me a madman in this world. Why am I not allowed to even have opinions about the look of the operating system I'm using?

    Kind of off-topic, but this is a really tiresome sentiment. Of course one is allowed to have opinions - the author is clear that they have been making themselves heard repeatedly. Other people also also allowed to have opinions, and importantly, they are allowed to disagree with yours. Just because your opinion isn't in the majority as you'd like it to be, doesn't invalidate it. What must be meant by this is "why am I not allowed to even have opinions without being disagreed with?" and I hope the answer to that is obvious.

    Not to mention this blog post itself, which does not have comments. There's your opinion!

    3 votes
  15. Comment on “I have become convinced that Kremlin has made a decision to invade Ukraine later this winter.” (Dec 21, 2021) in ~misc

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    I see you too listen to Risky Business?

    I see you too listen to Risky Business?

  16. Comment on <deleted topic> in ~misc

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    Have to object to this part. Ukraine extracted all the concessions (in the form of financial aid and so on) that it reasonably could in exchange for its nukes at the time, considering that the...

    Ukraine now sorely regrets that it disassembled its nuclear arsenal in the 1990s, while not getting formal defensive alliances to guarantee its borders. Had Ukraine still had nukes, they would still be a free and independent country and not under invasion.

    Have to object to this part. Ukraine extracted all the concessions (in the form of financial aid and so on) that it reasonably could in exchange for its nukes at the time, considering that the entire Western world was breathing down its neck, telling it not to keep them (to say nothing of the Russian Federation). What's more, while it had the nukes it didn't have the logistical or military infrastructure to keep, maintain and fire them on its own; also, most of them were long-range nukes suitable for the USSR to strike the USA, not Ukraine to strike its neighbour. Trying to keep the nukes would have been a very expensive and wasteful white whale, and would have cost them all the support that they did get, so it seems a stretch to say they regret not doing that.


    To your wider point, I agree that NATO can't be held responsible for this conflict, but not that the article is ridiculous. My takeaway was that the expansion of NATO gave Putin a low-hanging fruit to agitate around when he felt that military antagonism was his best option. Would he have found something else to object to, had NATO not been (supposedly) encroaching on his borders? Maybe. But it might have been much harder for him to sell, internally at least.

    The question posed is whether that rhetorical gift to Putin was worth the expansion of NATO - specifically worth it to America, because this piece is certainly US-focused. I think that's a valid question, from that focus.

    But I also think (and you make this point too) it ignores that those countries then, and countries like Sweden, Finland and Ukraine now, make their own decisions on whether a mutual-defence alliance is the right move for them. It's not a matter of them being American puppets as Putin would like, so it's ridiculous to demand that NATO not accept Ukraine as a member when that is ultimately the choice of Ukraine.

    Although, I was interested to learn that Ukraine has requested NATO membership for a long time and it's largely been NATO's side that has ignored it (precisely, you would think, for the risk of this invasion). Maybe this is a problem of Putin's own invention after all.

    9 votes
  17. Comment on In France, a racist conspiracy theory edges into the mainstream in ~news

    Cycloneblaze
    Link Parent
    This is predicated on the idea that "your people" is a discrete thing that is separate from "other people", and that "your people" must be defended from the "other people". That my family will at...

    "Your family and people will end and that's a good thing"

    This is predicated on the idea that "your people" is a discrete thing that is separate from "other people", and that "your people" must be defended from the "other people". That my family will at some nebulous point in the future die out, or be in some way different to the way (read: the skin colour) that I am now. That is tribalism and it's racism. I'd rather attack that idea at its root.

    7 votes
  18. Comment on International Astronomical Union establishes centre to coordinate response to satellite constellations in ~space

    Cycloneblaze
    Link
    I'm pleased to see this move. It seems they have some buy-in from industry, but I take issue with one quote: I do not at all think that it's better to make piecemeal agreements that rely on the...

    I'm pleased to see this move. It seems they have some buy-in from industry, but I take issue with one quote:

    And, critically, it will act as a forum to discuss with industry voluntary measures that can be implemented to minimise the intrusiveness of the satellites. A good example has been SpaceX's and OneWeb's willingness to discuss how they can reduce the reflectivity of their spacecraft by applying different coatings or sunshields.

    "It's better to make these agreements than to go through regulations. But we're hopeful in talking with them already that some compromises can be made," said Dr [Connie] Walker.

    I do not at all think that it's better to make piecemeal agreements that rely on the goodwill of a profit-motivated company, than robust regulation that encompasses the whole sector.

    1 vote