Kuromantis's recent activity

  1. Comment on Scientists present plan to cool the world through geoengineering whiter clouds in ~science

  2. Comment on SPD candidate Scholz consolidates German election lead with TV debate win in ~news

    Kuromantis
    Link
    This seems like the big question if the CSU is going to fail. If Linke is primarily Ostalgists who aren't supporters of the EU for more fundamental reasons than insufficient democracy instead of a...

    A snap poll for ARD television taken soon after the 90 minute debate showed that 41% of those asked thought Scholz was the most convincing performer, compared to 27% for Laschet and 25% for the Greens candidate, Annalena Baerbock.

    In the last three months the conservatives have lost 8-9 percentage points. Laschet, the jovial if uncharismatic leader of Germany's most populous state North Rhine-Westphalia, is trying to make up for mistakes during the campaign.

    In the debate, Laschet also pressed Scholz on whether he would form an alliance with the Greens and the far-left Linke, which opposes NATO and is critical of many aspects of the EU.

    Scholz again declined to rule out working with the Linke, arguing first that voters must have their say in the election. However, he made clear that there were clear differences between the parties which would make a coalition very difficult.

    This seems like the big question if the CSU is going to fail. If Linke is primarily Ostalgists who aren't supporters of the EU for more fundamental reasons than insufficient democracy instead of a German DSA analogue and all of the SPD's (brand) new voters are centrists who voted for the CSU that aren't concerned about the state of Germany, and unlike in the US there isn't a laundry list of problems and talking points for progressives to bring up immediately when someone says things are fine, (although there still are some fairly important problems) then it doesn't seem to be likely that anyone will actually be pressed to not just make another centrist government and continue to do nothing.

  3. Comment on What's something that you feel is unfairly criticized? in ~talk

    Kuromantis
    Link Parent
    I find a more accurate description to be a dictatorship (well, usually just the rule of) of whoever sits at the middle of the legislative offices and their electors (assuming they care). It's...

    I find a more accurate description to be a dictatorship (well, usually just the rule of) of whoever sits at the middle of the legislative offices and their electors (assuming they care). It's pretty apparent in the US for example, where the current administration is more accurately described as a Manchin (& some other 'moderate democrats')-McConnell administration than the Biden-Harris administration because basically most of the legislation being passed is being passed with his blessings and no one else. Politics used to be known for the watering down of bills and inertness before people had enough. It seems the only way to get more meaningful change is to change who is at the middle of the legislative offices (usually by changing the median political opinion) or to try to not have a center at all like in the US. (Relatively speaking.)

    2 votes
  4. Comment on Hyperbolica devlog #6: Pushing Unity to it's limits in ~games.game_design

    Kuromantis
    Link Parent
    I do think this guess someone gave to you that the game will not be about that much other than said walking in hyperbolic space is likely. IMO, given we've seen the character shooting some...

    I do think this guess someone gave to you that the game will not be about that much other than said walking in hyperbolic space is likely. IMO, given we've seen the character shooting some electrified-looking bubbles, done some light platforming and talking to other characters, I think it will be a mix of those things, so a mix of walking around in the hyperbolic geometry, platforming and maybe some shooting, followed with occasionally having some characters tell you what you need do to.

    1 vote
  5. Comment on Weekly US politics news and updates thread - week of September 6 in ~news

    Kuromantis
    Link
    Some polling on how Americans relate to (Islamic fundamentalist) terrorism and 9/11: Americans have never forgotten 9/11 I would have liked some polling on how people feel about the public...

    Some polling on how Americans relate to (Islamic fundamentalist) terrorism and 9/11: Americans have never forgotten 9/11

    There are so few moments in history that call for the question “Where were you when you heard the news?” But the Sept. 11 attacks are undoubtedly one, and most Americans can answer that question without missing a beat. Earlier this month, YouGov asked Americans if they could remember where they were, and 81 percent said they could. In a separate poll, Pew Research Center found that 93 percent of adults age 30 (or 10 and older at the attacks) and over could remember.

    For example, Americans have remained convinced that a terrorist attack is likely. A series of polls from The Economist/YouGov conducted from 2013 to 20211 asked what Americans think are the chances of a terrorist attack in the U.S. in the next 12 months. Those who thought an attack was “very” or “somewhat” likely rarely dipped below 50 percent and often spiked following major terrorist attacks in the U.S. or Europe. (Any time the responses rose about 70 percent, it was following a major attack.)

    Similarly, Pew’s annual survey of policy priorities has found Americans rank terrorism at or near the top of the list year over year. As recently as 2020, 74 percent of Americans said defending against terrorism should be (one of the) top priorities for the president and Congress, making it the number-one policy issue.

    Americans also consistently say that 9/11 has had a lasting impact on this country. [...] Notably, though, the feelings on whether this is a change for the better or worse has shifted: In 2002, 67 percent of Americans said that the 9/11 attacks changed America for the better. That number has declined since, with only 33 percent saying so in 2021.

    I would have liked some polling on how people feel about the public reaction to the attack in hindsight since to me the highlight of the attack is that somewhere around 3 out of 4 Americans who previously opposed George H.W Bush became supporters of him basically overnight, although IMO the way the article talks about the event demonstrates that asking that question would probably not give you the best results.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on Hyperbolica devlog #6: Pushing Unity to it's limits in ~games.game_design

    Kuromantis
    Link
    A video about how the lack of engines built for hyperbolic geometry forces him to bend Unity to suit his development needs, among other technical tricks.

    A video about how the lack of engines built for hyperbolic geometry forces him to bend Unity to suit his development needs, among other technical tricks.

    1 vote
  7. Comment on China's media cracks down on 'effeminate' styles in ~news

    Kuromantis
    (edited )
    Link
    And more stuff about the Chinese government hinting at a potential return to leftist economic practices: But generally, a large amount of this is related to the CCP's cultural leanings, whether...

    China's broadcasting regulator has said it will ban "effeminate" aesthetics in entertainment shows and that "vulgar influencers" should be avoided.

    It's part of a tightening of rules over what it described as "unhealthy content" in programmes.

    The National Radio and Television Administration (NRTA) said political and moral conduct should be included as criteria in the selection of actors.

    And more stuff about the Chinese government hinting at a potential return to leftist economic practices:

    Rana Mitter, a professor of the history and politics of modern China at the University of Oxford, said the idea of "common prosperity" was a way of "criticising the immense inequality that now marks society".

    "Prominent figures with high wealth are a clear target because criticism of them resonates on social media," he said.

    "Having started with tech billionaires, the Party is making it clear that prominent showbiz stars are now another clear target."

    Earlier this month, at a meeting of the Chinese Communist party's Central Financial and Economic Affairs Commission, state media reported that while in the early years of China's reform some were enabled to "get rich first", now the government wanted to invoke prosperity "for all". The committee pledged to regulate high earnings in a better way and to "reasonably adjust excessive income".

    But generally, a large amount of this is related to the CCP's cultural leanings, whether they're doing it for some "practical" reason or purely because they personally don't like the idea of gender-non-conforming men.

    The country's official Xinhua News Agency criticised what it termed society's effeminate male celebrities in 2018. The agency added: "To cultivate a new generation that will shoulder the responsibility of national rejuvenation, we need to resist erosion from indecent culture."

    In China, homosexuality is not illegal but authorities are strict on censorship and edited out gay references in the Oscar winning Freddie Mercury biopic "Bohemian Rhapsody", though they kept many similar references in the movie "Green Book". Nudity and sex scenes were also edited out of widely-viewed series such as "Game of Thrones" and the film "The Shape of Water".

    3 votes
  8. Comment on Andrew Yang to launch a third party in ~news

    Kuromantis
    Link Parent
    The way I understand it: One can get a majority of the electoral college vote (which you get by getting the largest share of the popular vote in the individual states+DC) with a plurality or even...

    Can't someone with a plurality of votes be elected POTUS?

    The way I understand it:

    One can get a majority of the electoral college vote (which you get by getting the largest share of the popular vote in the individual states+DC) with a plurality or even a minority of the popular vote like in 1912 where Wilson got 435 (out of 531) electoral votes with 42% of the vote because there were 3 (relatively) large parties opposing them as opposed to just one like it was since the Civil War.

    However, if no one gets a majority of the electoral college vote, the election is then passed to the house of representatives where the majority of the house members of each state vote for who will become president, and whichever candidate has the most states backing him wins. This happened in 1825 where 13 states voted to elect John Quincy Adams president after not reaching a majority in the electoral college or the popular vote.

    In Canada three parties exist just fine in FPTP -- yes, there is a layer of abstraction in that you don't vote directly for a PM but other than the possibility of a coalition government gaining confidence of the house I don't see how it would differ.

    Firstly, if you're talking about the Bloc Quebecois, FPTP with single member districts tends to favor regionalist parties partly by virtue of the districts being regional themselves and because a regionalist party usually only needs a plurality of the vote to get decent representation of the state, which isn't hard with multiple other parties. I also forgot to mention the Senate in the US is also elected like the house is but most of the states are much larger than any given house district, which makes it even harder for their parties to win.

    Strategically, I think the presence of the NDP in Canada does lead to some vote-splitting that does benefit the Conservatives from time to time but it also legitimizes and popularizes left-wing politics as well so I don't think its entirely self-harming. And I say that as a predominantly Liberal voter.

    While the NDP does seem to be perfectly capable of holding it's own politically (and it's politics are better than the libs), I think it definitely often lets conservatives get away with government with only 40% or so of the vote.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on Andrew Yang to launch a third party in ~news

    Kuromantis
    Link Parent
    No, just the nature of FPTP. There's also the fact that the president is also elected with a FPTP election unlike in the UK or Canada, which means multiple parties make it more likely for the...

    No, just the nature of FPTP. There's also the fact that the president is also elected with a FPTP election unlike in the UK or Canada, which means multiple parties make it more likely for the presidential election to be passed to the house.

    6 votes
  10. Comment on The 'Shoulder Check' problem, or when snippets of LGBT life feel out of place to others in fiction in ~lgbt

    Kuromantis
    (edited )
    Link
    An interesting article about how including doses of realism when it comes to LGBT living is often a bit of a roadbump to straight people who just want to read some wholesome love stories.

    An interesting article about how including doses of realism when it comes to LGBT living is often a bit of a roadbump to straight people who just want to read some wholesome love stories.

    Dino leaned over and kissed the top of his head. Silas glanced around the restaurant, but they were tucked in a corner, mostly out of sight.

    “Careful. This isn’t the Village,” he reminded Dino.

    — from “Faux Ho Ho,” by ‘Nathan Burgoine

    “I don’t like it when you have them check to see if anyone’s looking when they kiss. It’s sad. It kicks me out of the moment.”

    That’s a paraphrase of this most recent comment, obviously, but I’ve lost track of how many times I’ve had some variation of that feedback from women reading my queer romances, or had them bring it up face-to-face at conventions. As a counterpoint, I’ve never had it so much as mentioned negatively by queer men who’ve read my queer romances.

    10 votes
  11. Comment on Tech workers rebel against a lame-ass Internet by bringing back ‘GeoCities-style’ WebRings in ~tech

    Kuromantis
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Admittedly I am not remotely close to the target audience of these sites but I found Bill's World Wide Boutique and Melon King amusing because it just seems like someone designed these places...

    Admittedly I am not remotely close to the target audience of these sites but I found Bill's World Wide Boutique and Melon King amusing because it just seems like someone designed these places according to all the most obnoxious stereotypes about 1995 websites and they know that. That being said, some of the sites are pretty interesting in their own merits, like 2 Bit about 2 Bit color displays.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on Can progressives be convinced that genetics matters? in ~science

    Kuromantis
    (edited )
    Link
    Is it just me or is a lot of this article is just the writer describing what the girl he was talking to was dressing like or doing when he talked to her about genetics? That being said, this...

    Is it just me or is a lot of this article is just the writer describing what the girl he was talking to was dressing like or doing when he talked to her about genetics?

    That being said, this article does have serious points worth taking about:

    Harden thinks that the conversation about behavior genetics will continue to go in circles as long as we preserve the facile distinction between immutable genetic causes and malleable environmental ones. We would be better off if we accepted that everything is woven of long causal chains from genes through culture to personhood, and that the more we understand about them the more effective our interventions might be.

    The ultimate claim of “The Genetic Lottery” is an extraordinarily ambitious act of moral entrepreneurialism. Harden argues that an appreciation of the role of simple genetic luck—alongside all the other arbitrary lotteries of birth—will make us, as a society, more inclined to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to enjoy lives of dignity and comfort. She writes, “I think we must dismantle the false distinction between ‘inequalities that society is responsible for addressing’ and ‘inequalities that are caused by differences in biology.’ ” She cites research showing that most people are much more willing to support redistributive policies if differences in opportunity are seen as arbitrarily unfair—and deeply pervasive.

    The perspective of “gene blindness,” she believes, “perpetuates the myth that those of us who have ‘succeeded’ in twenty-first century capitalism have done so primarily because of our own hard work and effort, and not because we happened to be the beneficiaries of accidents of birth, both environmental and genetic.” She invokes the writing of the philosophers John Rawls and Elizabeth Anderson to argue that we need to reject “the idea that America is or could ever be the sort of ‘meritocracy’ where social goods are divided up according to what people deserve.” Her rhetoric is grand, though the practical implications, insofar as she discusses them, are not far removed from the mid-century social-democratic consensus—the priorities of, say, Hubert Humphrey. If genes play a significant role in educational attainment, then perhaps we ought to design our society such that you don’t need a college degree to secure health care.

    I do think including genetic differences as something we can build cushions against with welfare like all the other more external burdens that affect the less fortunate is a good reason to care about because then we would need to know what sections of any given person's genome would make them worse at various things we want to improve in our society in order to help them. I think the main problem is that fundamentally the more common assocations people have with genetics, which is (as mentioned in article) to either explain behavior by comparing it to the person's parents, something which was once used to advance racism and something which makes some people worse-looking through poor luck, which all have in common of (as is mentioned in the article) being entirely unsystemic and entirely unchangeable, which, as is also mentioned by the article, needs to be changed. Thing is, if some genetically caused issues are not entirely unfixable, then IMO it implies that we can solve genetic problems with solutions that are not genetic in nature, which makes understanding why we need to understand why we need behavioral genetics to solve these issues harder.

    And more generally, the left doesn't seem to have a particularly understandable way of dealing with people's genetic differences. We have acceptance and making the language used to describe people who face those differences less negative with things like anti-ableism and preferring words like "plus sized" over "fat" which are fine but I find it hard to reconcile with when these conditions make people suffer for reasons that aren't easily addressed by a more accepting society, and changing how people use language is really hard to do, especially when simple etymological reasons for change may not be clearly within reach or perceived as up-to-date enough to push an argument.

    7 votes
  13. Comment on Weekly US politics news and updates thread - week of August 30 in ~news

    Kuromantis
    Link
    House panel backs requiring women to register for the draft (if the US govt decides to use the draft again, as of right now it's apparently a contingency plan and has been so since 1973.)...

    House panel backs requiring women to register for the draft (if the US govt decides to use the draft again, as of right now it's apparently a contingency plan and has been so since 1973.)

    During late night deliberations on the committee's annual defense policy bill, lawmakers voted 35-24 to adopt an amendment from Rep. Chrissy Houlahan (D-Pa.) to expand registration for the Selective Service System beyond men.

    The move caps off a contentious debate and could stir up conservative opposition to the National Defense Authorization Act, which authorizes defense spending and lays out military policy.

    Several Republicans broke ranks to help Democrats to adopt the amendment.

    If the provision remains in the defense bill and passes on the House floor, the change has a high chance of becoming law. The Senate Armed Services Committee adopted a similar provision in its defense bill, which awaits a floor vote.

    "We don't need to draft women in order for women to have equality in this nation," said Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-Mo.). "Women are of worth and of value right now and we are equal with men without having to pass a new law that would require 50 percent of this country — our daughters and our sisters and our wives — to have to be drafted."

    (Republicans claiming to support women is a new one, lol.)

    My personal opinion in this is basically that a gender-neutral draft is better than a male only draft, but worse than keeping the volunteer only force the US army is, and I do think that this can be a "more female drone pilots" situation.

    1 vote
  14. [>] VS [`>`] VS [\>] VS [>]

    a quote. >a pre-formatted quote >a non formatted quote via the stock markdown syntax >a non formatted quote using some technical naming apparently from HTML i just wanted to show off that the last...

    a quote.

    >a pre-formatted quote

    >a non formatted quote via the stock markdown syntax

    >a non formatted quote using some technical naming apparently from HTML

    i just wanted to show off that the last one is a thing that exists tbh

    1 vote
  15. Comment on What's the coronavirus like where you are? in ~health.coronavirus

    Kuromantis
    (edited )
    Link
    Concerning vaccination, 96.6% of my state's adult population have taken their first dose and a bit over half of them have taken the second one. I don't know if this is because the state has some...

    Concerning vaccination, 96.6% of my state's adult population have taken their first dose and a bit over half of them have taken the second one. I don't know if this is because the state has some amount of penalties for avoiding or has relaxed the lockdowns for people taking the vaccines or if only one out of 30 people in my state are antivax. The statistics for the whole population would be 76% with the first dose and 40% fully 'vaxxed'. (I honestly dislike that term partly for sloganeering vaccination.)

    Current they're vaccinating people from 17 to 15 years old and tomorrow they will begin doing so for 14 to 12 year olds, which if the state vaccination website isn't poorly coded is the youngest people group to be vaccinated. I got my first dose a day or 2 before this because they vaccinated people with various conditions including mine (autism) separately. Fortunately for me, this meant I got to avoid the long lines my classmates have waiting in to get the vaccine. I asked in my group if the lines were long after seeing a relatively long one in my trip to the psychologist and one of my classmates said he waited for an hour and a half to get their dose. Some of my classmates (including me lol) have posted in their whatsapp statuses that they got their first dose.

    As for cases and deaths, it seems that they peaked at April this year and are now around 5 times lower than they were at that time, which should probably be credited entirely to vaccination. Hopefully we are Almost There by the end of the year.

    Several city and state governments have posted some pretty amusing things related to the vaccination effort. The City of Aracaju posted this, for example.

    6 votes
  16. Comment on China cuts amount of time minors can spend playing online video games to three hours a week, with an hour extra during holidays in ~games

    Kuromantis
    Link
    Interestingly, a lot of this is seemingly about online games, implying offline games aren't as drastically affected or not affected at all. Perhaps the Chinese government (also) finds it too...

    China has ordered its online gaming companies to further reduce the services they provide to young gamers, in a move intended to curb what the authorities described as “youth video game addiction”.

    Under the new rule, young gamers are only allowed to spend an hour playing online games on Fridays, weekends and holidays, according to the official Xinhua news agency.

    The latest move followed reports that children were using adult IDs to circumvent rules. Previously, the authorities had limited young gamers’ playing time to 1.5 hours a day and to three hours on holidays.

    The new rules came amid a broad crackdown by Beijing on China’s tech giants, such as Alibaba Group and Tencent Holdings, which has unnerved investors, hammering Chinese shares traded at home and abroad.

    In July, Tencent rolled out a facial recognition “midnight patrol” function to root out children masquerading as adults to get around a government curfew on underage gamers.

    Interestingly, a lot of this is seemingly about online games, implying offline games aren't as drastically affected or not affected at all. Perhaps the Chinese government (also) finds it too difficult to control online voice chats and to remove dissent against itself or it's practices as opposed to this being purely paternalistic ideology or authoritarian anti-insomnia measures?

    10 votes