Seirdy's recent activity

  1. Comment on Misinformation about Permissions Policy and FLoC in ~comp

    Seirdy
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Updated the reference to the other post. Edit: updated again (a few times); it's less finger-pointy now. I really need to be less quick to publish

    Updated the reference to the other post.

    Edit: updated again (a few times); it's less finger-pointy now.

    I really need to be less quick to publish

    3 votes
  2. Comment on Misinformation about Permissions Policy and FLoC in ~comp

    Seirdy
    Link
    Lots of people have been spreading the often-unnecessary advice to add a Permissions-Policy response header to their sites to opt-out of Google’s FLoC, and some have been going so far as to ask...

    Lots of people have been spreading the often-unnecessary advice to add a Permissions-Policy response header to their sites to opt-out of Google’s FLoC, and some have been going so far as to ask FLOSS maintainers to patch their software to make this the default. When discussions got heated to the point of accusing webmasters who don’t implement these headers of being “complicit” in Google’s surveillance, I felt I had to write this.

    Everybody: please calm down, take a deep breath, and read the spec before you make such prescriptive advice about it.

    FLoC is terrible, but telling everyone to add a magic “opt-out header” in every situation conveys a misunderstanding of everything you need to know about the opt-in/out process.

    2 votes
  3. Comment on I like that the boat is stuck in ~life

    Seirdy
    Link Parent
    Is there a name for this humorous style of repetitive, cheerful, repetitive writing? Especially with regards to generally negative news (oil spills, a naval jam, etc). Another example: Discourse...

    Is there a name for this humorous style of repetitive, cheerful, repetitive writing? Especially with regards to generally negative news (oil spills, a naval jam, etc).

    Another example: Discourse on HTTPS from n-gate, one of my favorite websites. I don't entirely agree with it and it isn't as funny as "the front fell off" and doesn't have the same sort of microhumor as the OP, but it was an excellent read nonetheless.

    6 votes
  4. Comment on A look at search engines with their own indexes in ~tech

    Seirdy
    Link Parent
    I discovered Petal, Gowiki, Crawlson, Yisou, Seznam, and Apple Search through my own access logs. I'm sure more have hit my site, but only keep logs for three to five days (and only for certain...

    I think it'd be interesting to cross-reference your findings with an aggregate of webserver logs.

    I discovered Petal, Gowiki, Crawlson, Yisou, Seznam, and Apple Search through my own access logs. I'm sure more have hit my site, but only keep logs for three to five days (and only for certain HTTP responses) and I don't plan on changing that.

    Most spiders in my experience aren't for search engines, let alone publicly-available general search engines; they're for SEO services, adtech, or benign content scrapers that grab content for link previews or bookmarking services.

    1 vote
  5. Comment on A look at search engines with their own indexes in ~tech

    Seirdy
    Link Parent
    It was originally designed for finding Android apps; however, it expanded to general search a few months ago. It continues to be mobile-first. I wouldn't directly use it for anything non-trivial...

    It was originally designed for finding Android apps; however, it expanded to general search a few months ago. It continues to be mobile-first.

    I wouldn't directly use it for anything non-trivial given its obvious privacy issues and piles of JS, but I hope it can be incorporated into other privacy-respecting metasearch/proxy engines.

    1 vote
  6. Comment on A look at search engines with their own indexes in ~tech

    Seirdy
    Link Parent
    That's just the tip of the iceberg; there are tons more that I didn't include because the list of Bing-based engines was just way too long.

    That's just the tip of the iceberg; there are tons more that I didn't include because the list of Bing-based engines was just way too long.

    4 votes
  7. Comment on A look at search engines with their own indexes in ~tech

    Seirdy
    Link
    Feedback and additions are welcome. Currently contains 30 indexing search engines.

    Feedback and additions are welcome. Currently contains 30 indexing search engines.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on Who's on the fediverse? in ~talk

    Seirdy
    Link
    @seirdy@pleroma.envs.net (non-js link). It's part of the envs.net tilde. Been thinking of making my own site a Fedi and xmpp instance so I could be seirdy@seirdy.one for email, fedi, and xmpp.

    @seirdy@pleroma.envs.net (non-js link). It's part of the envs.net tilde.

    Been thinking of making my own site a Fedi and xmpp instance so I could be seirdy@seirdy.one for email, fedi, and xmpp.

    1 vote
  9. Comment on AWS announces they will create and maintain an Apache-licensed fork of Elasticsearch and Kibana in ~comp

    Seirdy
    Link Parent
    A better approach would be to make the software a complement of another product that isn't just hosting. Customization, training, consultation, migration, consultation, etc. can all help pay the...

    A better approach would be to make the software a complement of another product that isn't just hosting.

    Customization, training, consultation, migration, consultation, etc. can all help pay the bills.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on Becoming physically immune to brute-force attacks in ~comp

    Seirdy
    Link Parent
    I'd previously stumbled upon that article, but decided not to include it since it focused on too many variables and took a less extreme approach (A 1-kg black hole? That's it?). This was before I...

    I'd previously stumbled upon that article, but decided not to include it since it focused on too many variables and took a less extreme approach (A 1-kg black hole? That's it?). This was before I added a "further reading" section.

    Thanks for bringing it back to my attention; I added it to the "Further reading section. Diff.

    3 votes
  11. Comment on Anyone using a lightweight browser with Linux? in ~comp

    Seirdy
    Link
    Most "lightweight" browsers use a heavy engine like Blink, Webkit, or Gecko. Of these three. Webkit is the lightest. Lightweight browsers that use an actual lightweight engine: Netsurf: limited...

    Most "lightweight" browsers use a heavy engine like Blink, Webkit, or Gecko. Of these three. Webkit is the lightest.

    Lightweight browsers that use an actual lightweight engine:

    • Netsurf: limited and experimental support for JavaScript, but otherwise renders quite well.

    • Dillo: very limited support for CSS, passable support for HTML5. No JavaScript.

    • Konqueror with KHTML: KHTML isn't packaged for as many distros anymore, and is the ancestor to Webkit. Very poor JS support, but decent support for HTML/CSS. Can switch to QtWebengine (based on Blink) for sites that break in KHTML.

    • Links: has a graphical mode with -g. No support for CSS, poor text rendering.

    • hv3: uses tkhtml. I haven't used this one, but it seems slightly better than KHTML.

    Edit: also, obligatory "f1rst p0st!!1"

    5 votes