UniquelyGeneric's recent activity

  1. Comment on Alex Jones’s Pepe the Frog Copyright Trial Will Help Decide Who Can Use Memes in ~misc

    UniquelyGeneric Link Parent
    Aren’t memes monetizable today, though? Know Your Meme and Meme Generator are sites dedicated to memes, with potential profit off of an ad model. Reddit, if it could get its own shit together,...

    Aren’t memes monetizable today, though? Know Your Meme and Meme Generator are sites dedicated to memes, with potential profit off of an ad model.

    Reddit, if it could get its own shit together, would probably make the most revenue/views off of memes. Even Grumpy Cat’s owner made thousands of dollars off the likeness of their pet.

    Copyright law has been ruined by Disney, so I’m very conflicted by the desire to protect original artist’s work, but I don’t think this is a headline due to the Internet’s need to make meme-money, but rather due to Alex Jones’s VERY polarizing figure.

    7 votes
  2. Comment on What is something you are reasonably certain is true, but you have no proof for it? in ~talk

    UniquelyGeneric Link Parent
    One could surmise that the flood myths are oral tradition remnants of ancient flooding.

    One could surmise that the flood myths are oral tradition remnants of ancient flooding.

    6 votes
  3. Comment on Meal kit delivery services like Blue Apron have an overall smaller carbon footprint than grocery shopping because of less food waste and a more streamlined supply chain. in ~science

    UniquelyGeneric Link
    I think a key aspect for me that the article fails to mention is that these meal packs were entirely designed around a 2 person home. When I first moved to NYC I tried Blue Apron in order to see...

    I think a key aspect for me that the article fails to mention is that these meal packs were entirely designed around a 2 person home.

    When I first moved to NYC I tried Blue Apron in order to see if I could continue to cook for myself, but the lifestyle that NYC enables is not one well fitted for cooking bachelor meals. I would find myself getting overrun with meal packs (3 meals to feed two people). Leftovers can only remain appetizing for so long, and by the time you’re wrapping up one pack, you have a backlog added by the next shipment. Inevitably I had to throw out food that had gone bad.

    Perhaps I didn’t realize how easily I would have been eating out, but I have a small stomach to begin with, making leftovers necessary. It also expects multiple hands in the preparation, which for a single person can add up extra time for food preparation, and increasing my commitment to the plan.

    The last straw for me was that I had conscientiously deferred a few weeks of food shipments, hoping to use a more ad-hoc model of the service, but they only let you cancel so many weeks in advance, and when I discovered I had a shipment I did not expect I knew I could not continue a service that was unsustainable.

    Perhaps I’m in the minority of users, but I certainly wasted food for lack of planning my entire week around it. I’m sure it wasn’t good for the environment, and that’s partly why I stopped (it also wasn’t any cheaper than if I had just gotten groceries for each meal myself).

    6 votes
  4. Comment on Movie Monday Free Talk in ~movies

    UniquelyGeneric Link Parent
    I, too, watched Paterson this weekend. I saw it was a comedy about the banality of life and I thought it would be a good balance to watching Neighboring Sounds, which I actually picked up from a...

    I, too, watched Paterson this weekend. I saw it was a comedy about the banality of life and I thought it would be a good balance to watching Neighboring Sounds, which I actually picked up from a Tildes user.

    Neighboring Sounds was good, but built up a lot of unrelieved tension throughout. I liked it for the “slice of life” scenes that made it feel more human, and while the plot was interesting in retrospect, it had more atmospheric danger than I expected, making it a bit of a stressor to watch.

    Paterson, in retrospect, was not a great follow up for a more lighthearted comedy. All the jokes were exposed in the trailer, and the entire movie was ennui at full blast. I enjoyed the overall tone of the movie as it was a little less draining than Neighboring Sounds, but it still dragged on in a way that was necessary to the plot. Had I been in a different mood, I might have enjoyed its ponderous vibe a little more.

    1 vote
  5. Comment on Linguists found the weirdest languages – and English is one of them in ~humanities

    UniquelyGeneric (edited ) Link Parent
    Again, I'm only a wordsmith by hobby, so I'm by no means an expert, but perhaps I can revise my original thought to instead be that while English may have a Germanic root, the Latin influence was...

    Again, I'm only a wordsmith by hobby, so I'm by no means an expert, but perhaps I can revise my original thought to instead be that while English may have a Germanic root, the Latin influence was far stronger than later influences due to it preceding the overall global spread of the language. As English exposed itself to new geographic locations and foreign languages, even the distances between regional dialects start to contribute loan words.

    english doesn't have a couple of the major tells of the romance languages

    It still borrows over half it's lexicon from Latin and French nonetheless, and the lack of stringent word formulation rules allow it to use more varied spellings and pronunciations (e.g. gendered conjugations no longer require the same handful of suffixes).

    agglutinative languages for example can pretty casually create "words" that are incredibly precise

    I feel that's not quite the same vein, where English also has words like "antidisestablishmentarianism" which get can the specific point across, but are obscenely unreadable. One could argue that Finnish needs those agglutinative words because it's less ubiquitous and doesn't share enough loan words with other languages.

    If you look at the Latin alphabet that English inherited, it originates from the Phoenicians who themselves needed a written method to keep track of the various phonemes they spoke while trading across the Mediterranean. English, similarly, has had to adapt through its constant exposure to other languages, fulfilling a virtuous cycle of extensibility.

    Now, something that's not unique to English is slang, which is itself an invented word for "shorted language". I feel it's in that ever-evolving repurposing of language where newly connected neurons in the linguistic part of the mind achieve language's original desire to communicate novel experiences. So, while any language+mind can potentially foment new words, I guess my point is English is uniquely positioned to be the progenitor of many due to a critical mass of speakers that's only further enhanced by its omnipresence on Internet.

    1 vote
  6. Comment on Linguists found the weirdest languages – and English is one of them in ~humanities

    UniquelyGeneric (edited ) Link Parent
    What I think contributes to English’s “weirdness” is that it’s actually a combination of two language families, Romance/Latin and Germanic, with some sprinkles of other language roots (Greek,...

    What I think contributes to English’s “weirdness” is that it’s actually a combination of two language families, Romance/Latin and Germanic, with some sprinkles of other language roots (Greek, Gaelic, and even Arabic). Without pretending to be a linguist myself, I’m fascinated by etymologies as they show a more organic flow of history as it affected people’s lives.

    It’s this hodgepodge of roots that provides English with a large amount of flexibility in creating new words. For example, “hodgepodge” has a French root and “mishmash” has a Germanic one. They mean the same thing, but either can be used depending on the context (e.g. “mishmash” can be used to imply that there is more of a mismatch that occurred).

    Because of this, we have words like “Internet” which are a mix of Latin (inter-) and Germanic (net), and have been adopted across the world. This influx of words surely makes learning English more difficult, but it also opens the possibilities of more appropriately describing increasingly complicated concepts of the modern world.

    I can’t tell whether English is the de facto language of the Internet is a function of:

    • US creation of the infrastructure & programming languages

    OR

    • Ubiquity of English due to British colonialism

    Regardless, I think its flexible lexicon (flexicon?) has enabled English to adapt better than most languages to the changing dynamics of human thought.

    5 votes
  7. Comment on Behind the process of Helvetica’s 21st century facelift in ~misc

    UniquelyGeneric (edited ) Link
    For those that haven’t seen Helvetica, I highly suggest giving it a shot. Not only is it one of the better of Gary Hustwit’s design trilogy, it’s a fascinating dive into the process and psychology...

    For those that haven’t seen Helvetica, I highly suggest giving it a shot. Not only is it one of the better of Gary Hustwit’s design trilogy, it’s a fascinating dive into the process and psychology of the most common font.

    It was built for the modern world, and as such got rid of many serifs and appendices that were holdovers of printing long ago. With better technology became better precision and there was no need to provide additional indicators of a letter’s shape, when it can clearly be discerned from afar.

    I find it very interesting that Helvetica is being revamped to fit more recent developments of modern life becoming micro-focused, but I can’t say that I’m all that taken aback by the sample at smaller fonts they shared. Perhaps that’s the magic of how seamlessly they shrunk the typeface, but I couldn’t discern what was so revolutionary about making a logical iteration of the same font.

    I’m also not sure we need a typeset that can be read at sizes the human eye struggles to identify. Without advanced technology to provide the precision for perception, it seems the updated font may just be an ambitious marketing effort to get a design company back in the limelight.

    4 votes
  8. Comment on Unknown Mortal Orchestra - Hunnybee (be sure not to miss out on the video) in ~music

    UniquelyGeneric Link Parent
    I definitely have grown on Hunnybee, though I would say that it is more down tempo and therefore the vocal track stands out more thank is typical for UMO. Also, @rkcr if you haven’t heard of...

    I definitely have grown on Hunnybee, though I would say that it is more down tempo and therefore the vocal track stands out more thank is typical for UMO.

    Also, @rkcr if you haven’t heard of Unknown Mortal Orchestra, I highly suggest Multi-Love, although the video may be a bit disorienting (which is a bit of the point).

    3 votes
  9. Comment on Tildistas, do you read or have you read any webcomics? in ~talk

    UniquelyGeneric Link Parent
    I loved this webcomic when it was still ongoing. There was something about its enigmatic simplicity and somber tone that made it feel like a zen koan. The artwork certainly reflected its vibe as well.

    A Softer World (some of my absolute favorite art that I periodically revisit)

    I loved this webcomic when it was still ongoing. There was something about its enigmatic simplicity and somber tone that made it feel like a zen koan.

    The artwork certainly reflected its vibe as well.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on The privacy paradox in ~tech

    UniquelyGeneric Link Parent
    This will surely impact the profitability of many adtech companies (which isn't necessarily a bad thing), but it could lead to more desperate/invasive moves to gather data. Apple has taken a good...

    Privacy settings need to be opt-out, with the default being more privacy.

    This will surely impact the profitability of many adtech companies (which isn't necessarily a bad thing), but it could lead to more desperate/invasive moves to gather data. Apple has taken a good stance towards privacy-by-default, and it looks like Google will inevitably have to do something similar.

    Rather than depend on the input of apathetic users (read: "I have nothing to hide, so why should I care" types), perhaps building privacy into products is the only way to protect it. Of course this requires the benevolence of corporations, and ones who make money off of advertising have an economic incentive to sandbag any increase in privacy, so we'll see how things net out.

    4 votes
  11. Comment on What are your hobbies? And how do you get into them? in ~hobbies

    UniquelyGeneric Link
    I have a handful of hobbies that I pursue when I’m feeling productive in my free time: Piano I’ve been playing for 20+ years. Originally I was classically trained, with the past 5-10 less formally...

    I have a handful of hobbies that I pursue when I’m feeling productive in my free time:

    Piano

    I’ve been playing for 20+ years. Originally I was classically trained, with the past 5-10 less formally taught, but perhaps the most advancement as well.

    I enjoy learning new jazz standards, or covering songs I enjoy, but without the time (or maybe patience) to learn every detail of a song, I’ve gotten more comfortable coming up with my own. I started writing music after jamming with others and I find this is when I enjoy music the most, so I’ve tried to make it productive by recording (audio or writing it down) as much as possible.

    Creative Coding

    One of my more recent endeavors has been setting up a website where I can focus on artistic creation. Not willing to share as I’d want to build it out more, but the general idea has been creating looping images through p5.js and then pairing music I’ve written with it.

    Eventually I would like to have the music be the driver behind the animation so it would all sync, but that would require more familiarity with the process that I’m just not at yet.

    There isn’t an ultimate goal, but having gone to school for engineering I wanted to find a way to keep up my skills even though I don’t have a true outlet at work. Perhaps it’s a portfolio that will be useful later, or maybe it’s a fun thing to show at a bar. Either way, it’s art for art’s sake (and maybe my own interest).

    Obscure Media

    I enjoy finding and curating a collection of media that is off the beaten path. This could be anything from silent films, art house, SlowTV, out of print magazines, etc.

    There isn’t a specific criteria any of them must meet, but I do look for more through-provoking, boundary-pushing pieces. The obscurity is also subjective, as even a classic can fit in if it seems to stir the right kind of emotions up in its presentation.

    8 votes
  12. Comment on The privacy paradox in ~tech

    UniquelyGeneric Link
    I worked at a behavioral economics lab back in college, and one of the experiments focused on privacy. The experiment at its core was to incentivize you to give a juicy (but true) secret....

    I worked at a behavioral economics lab back in college, and one of the experiments focused on privacy. The experiment at its core was to incentivize you to give a juicy (but true) secret. Regardless of the veracity of the secret, it would be exposed to the person next to you, the row you sit in, or the entire room (everyone would know it was you who wrote it).

    The interesting part of the experiment is that when you factored in probabilities (e.g. it’s only a 10% chance everyone in the room knows your secret), no one changed their valuations. A rational actor would change their expected value of the situation, but when you talk about people’s privacy their emotional mind takes over, and it’s an all-or-nothing switch.

    The outcome of the experiment was twofold: everyone feels their privacy is an inalienable right, but that they’re not willing to spend any money to protect it. I think this point is even more prescient with the current state of technology today. Here we are with privacy scandal after privacy scandal, and yet opt out rates remain abysmally small with only modest adoption of privacy tools.

    Will the world get more privacy conscious and act on it? It’s unclear, but as others have alluded to in the thread, it might just be our human nature to ignore it until it’s too late.

    6 votes
  13. Comment on Google is rolling out AMP for Gmail to let you shop and fill out forms without leaving your inbox. in ~tech

    UniquelyGeneric (edited ) Link Parent
    Many ISPs only allow port 25 on a static IP if you have a business account. Otherwise you might be in a goofy situation where you can only send email but not receive. While there are certainly...

    Many ISPs only allow port 25 on a static IP if you have a business account. Otherwise you might be in a goofy situation where you can only send email but not receive. While there are certainly ways to set up a proper POP/IMAP server, it’s unfortunately not the most easy solution and for many they will be forced to trust a corporation managing their email.

    5 votes
  14. Comment on Why So Many Americans Are Turning to Buddhism in ~humanities

    UniquelyGeneric Link Parent
    Apologies if my hot take struck the wrong chord with you. I didn't intend to put down Buddhism as a religion, I had just read OP's article, and it was a subject I was interested in generating...

    Apologies if my hot take struck the wrong chord with you. I didn't intend to put down Buddhism as a religion, I had just read OP's article, and it was a subject I was interested in generating conversation around. I hurriedly wrote a comment while the post was still fresh to maximize its visibility. Since I am the only parent comment, it seems to have worked, and I appreciate your in depth response. That being said, I think you misinterpreted my comparisons as remarks on Buddhism, when I was more intending to comment on the perniciousness of the Western ego.

    Modern western science (not the silly eastern homeopathic stuff) has shown multiple benefits for yoga and meditation

    100% agree, and just today the NIH posted an article stating that "In one recent study, meditation was reported to increase release of dopamine," as well as "self-induced changes in mood can influence serotonin synthesis."

    Most of the time, though, you can disregard the nonsense and focus on the parts that have actual science behind them

    I do think there are elements of alternative medicines that can provide positive paths forward in medical research. CBD's recent federal treatment is certainly progress against the War on Drugs, which held back scientific research on chemicals with potential mental benefits. The comment about homeopathy/"healthy alternatives" was an observation that snake oil salesmen are nothing new, and the likes of Dr. Oz or the supplement MLM industry is just the Western capitalist ego sneaking itself back into the search for loss of ego.

    that's deeply ironic considering the approach eastern philosophies have toward minimizing the ego.

    This was my general point. The interest and adoption of eastern practices seems earnest in it's attempt. I just think it can get misguided, and sometimes seen as a status symbol for virtue signaling. Perhaps it's due to "buffet Buddhism" that yoga pants have become their own fashion line. People can choose what they want to incorporate into their lives, and for some that may include more heavy reliance on the ego. Maybe that's not an entirely bad thing, either.

    Committing to meditate regularly, even if not daily, is a big deal for a lot of people.

    I have tried meditation myself, although my biggest struggle is to let go of my own ego. I know that I can learn to clear my mind with more practice, but dedicating the time has had to battle with work and life getting in the way. One could argue it's the modern world imposing it's own stress on me, like OP's article implies, but it's still my responsibility to tend to my own mental garden.


    Anyways, figured I owed a response since you spent the time thinking about this, and I didn't want it to all have been spent on a potential misunderstanding, since I think we're closer aligned than you may think.

    Maybe you still don't agree with what I've clarified above, but that can be ok, too :)

    3 votes
  15. Comment on Movie Monday Free Talk in ~movies

    UniquelyGeneric Link
    I watched Burning yesterday, and thought it was really well done. It's a 2018 Korean film featuring Steven Yeun from The Walking Dead. The movie itself is based off a darkly ponderous short story...

    I watched Burning yesterday, and thought it was really well done. It's a 2018 Korean film featuring Steven Yeun from The Walking Dead. The movie itself is based off a darkly ponderous short story by Haruki Murakami.

    The story really hits home on themes around superficiality vs. authenticity, finding a greater purpose in life, and makes plenty of villainous comparisons with capitalist/Western/Gangnam culture.

    Fair warning, the movie is not incredibly uplifting, and is quite art-house, which makes it a slow burn (pun intended). That being said, it's certainly moving, and will leave you longing for a simpler world in this age of accelerating change.

    3 votes
  16. Comment on Apple Special Event - March 25, 2019 in ~tech

    UniquelyGeneric Link Parent
    The comment isn’t about Apple’s commitment to privacy (which is only a relatively recent stance, mind you), but the fact that Goldman Sachs is perceived as the epitome of immoral capitalist...

    When has Apple ever indicated it wasn't serious about the privacy of consumers?

    The comment isn’t about Apple’s commitment to privacy (which is only a relatively recent stance, mind you), but the fact that Goldman Sachs is perceived as the epitome of immoral capitalist behavior. While Apple can say that they have an agreement that Goldman will do nothing to further monetize user’s data, all that amounts to is an indemnification clause in their partnership agreement and no real ability to enforce the assumed-to-happen exploitation of finances that Goldman has become infamous for.

    The fact that the optics of using Goldman for such a high profile announcement could not be ignored, shows that Apple is either tone deaf at this point, or that they got a great deal from Goldman vs. other banks. I can’t imagine Goldman would make such a deal out of the goodness of their heart, but have alternative methods for receiving further revenue from supporting Apple’s infrastructure.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on Tame Impala - Patience in ~music

    UniquelyGeneric Link Parent
    Not quite the same 60s psychedelic rock, but here’s a few more: GUM Sweat Washed Out Mild High Club

    Not quite the same 60s psychedelic rock, but here’s a few more:

    • GUM
    • Sweat
    • Washed Out
    • Mild High Club
    3 votes
  18. Comment on Does anyone else get huge aimless bursts of inspiration? in ~talk

    UniquelyGeneric Link
    I totally get these as well, it’s usually when I’m in the middle of listening to new music, or having a new experience alone. Luckily, when I get this burst of creativity, I can record myself...

    I totally get these as well, it’s usually when I’m in the middle of listening to new music, or having a new experience alone. Luckily, when I get this burst of creativity, I can record myself playing piano to capture the moment. I usually review these recordings later so that I can start building on the motif I started.

    I tried writing and drawing but they don’t come as naturally (been playing piano for two decades). I have started getting into creative coding and pairing it with music, though, which has become an interesting output.

    4 votes
  19. Comment on Have you ever experienced Sleep Paralysis? in ~talk

    UniquelyGeneric Link
    Happened to me about 3 times, all in roughly the past 3-4 years. The first time was terrifying, but I was aware what sleep paralysis was, and that helped me to rationalize through it. My roommate...

    Happened to me about 3 times, all in roughly the past 3-4 years. The first time was terrifying, but I was aware what sleep paralysis was, and that helped me to rationalize through it. My roommate in college had experienced it a couple times and described it to me, and I had the same symptoms this time around as well. Eyes open. Completely immobile. The scary part of it is that despite knowing what was going on, the act of being completely immobile is incredibly claustrophobic. I would have hyperventilated if I could even control my breathing. Once I broke out of the paralysis, I was immediately gasping for air. The experience reminded me of the sensation of "getting the wind knocked out of you". I don't know if it was actually a form of sleep apnea, but I'm reminded of reading how in space the air needs to circulate or else you wake up in your own carbon dioxide pocket of air, which produces the suffocating effect.

    The most recent time I had sleep paralysis occur, I had the other scary side effect of feeling watched by some "other" being. I had this nightmarish dream wherein a decaying, zombie version of my mother walked into my closed bedroom. She slowly approached my bed menacingly, while I lay there staring at her. My screams were either muffled or choked out by the paralysis and I can say I was struck by terror in that moment. When I broke out of the dream/paralysis, I again had a shortness of breath and was deeply shaken.

    It might be relevant to point out I've had night terrors before, wherein I've woken up screaming, but those have occurred in the same frequency as my episodes of sleep paralysis (albeit since I was a kid). The same college roommate I referenced at the beginning was also known for regular sleep talking, and I have been known to do the same when sleep deprived. I'm not sure I can attribute any other factor into the onset of sleep paralysis, as they seem to have occurred sporadically in different environments, but I certainly do not look forward to the next one (if it happens).

    4 votes
  20. Comment on Apple confirms March 25th event, expected to announce new TV service in ~tech

    UniquelyGeneric Link Parent
    It doesn’t help that the death of net neutrality means that you could also be throttled despite having an adequate connection. As long as the telecoms see Netflix as harming their content...

    Internet SLA

    It doesn’t help that the death of net neutrality means that you could also be throttled despite having an adequate connection. As long as the telecoms see Netflix as harming their content business, they will continue to pull this lever.

    Content SLA

    I don’t think enough people realize how much content has only been leased for a limited time to stopgap the TV networks ability to produce their own competing platform. Disney’s complete exit from Netflix, and their upcoming new streaming service will be the bellwether if this is sustainable in an a la carte media ecosystem.

    Price creep

    On the subject of a la carte options, I think people didn’t realize the greatest lie that was ever told about the Internet: that it was free. Video distribution isn’t cheap, and many of the cable bundles were subsidized by the introduction of ads. People seem to forget that HBO was a premium service most people did not have access to. With every media company losing money on their linear broadcast by the day, they are going to offset their losses by charging for content. With everyone pricing for their own service, we’re going to see consumers pick and choose what they can live without. Unfortunately this means further conglomeration and less niche content.

    Tracking and Ads

    There are certainly instances where people are going to pay for an ad free experience, but the majority of people will likely accept the trade off of ads for cheap/free content. As has been argued before, piracy is a problem with content availability, not price. The pirates will still exist, for sure, but even that comes with some cost baked in (time, hardware, Usenet subscription). The net outcome of this effect will be that only lower income viewers will see the most ads, making the battle for their attention/wallet the most contentious. This will probably have some knock-on effects about consumption habits and attention disorders, while simultaneously making those who are willing to pay more for Apple/privacy-focused services a privileged class that also avoids brain rot.

    2 votes