vektor's recent activity

  1. Comment on Valtteri Bottas has taken full responsibility for the early chaos at the Hungarian Grand Prix, which ended his and several other drivers' races in ~sports

    vektor
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    What do you think of the AM effort to contest the DSQ of Vettel?

    What do you think of the AM effort to contest the DSQ of Vettel?

    2 votes
  2. Comment on What sports matches have you watched recently? in ~sports

    vektor
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    Was going to make a joke about the front falling off of Verstappen's car. Then I saw the Spa clip. Now I'm not so sure. Damn, that looks scary. Hungarian GP was a blast though, sad to see so many...

    Was going to make a joke about the front falling off of Verstappen's car. Then I saw the Spa clip. Now I'm not so sure. Damn, that looks scary.

    Hungarian GP was a blast though, sad to see so many drivers out, but I really like that Hamilton really had to work for his points. Shame that Verstappen didn't get the same opportunity. Great drive from a lot of other drivers, including MSC, Vettel, the Williamses and Alpines. I really want to see more wacky grid orders. I'd much prefer starting the race in reverse championship order (possibly modulated somewhat by qualifying position). Or heck, go completely random order. Be weird. The sprint race last time out was alright, but we can do better.

    4 votes
  3. Comment on Valve argues anti-Steam suit lacks “the most basic elements” of antitrust case in ~games

    vektor
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    EU/German Copyright law: You bought it, you own a copy. Easy as that. Or did the button in the shop say "rent"? No, it bloody didn't, so you own it. Slightly hot take: That allows you to pirate...

    EU/German Copyright law: You bought it, you own a copy. Easy as that. Or did the button in the shop say "rent"? No, it bloody didn't, so you own it.

    Slightly hot take: That allows you to pirate the game as you please. Steam servers go down or restrict your use of the game unreasonably? Fuck that. Arrr, sail the data seas.

    I am, of course, not a lawyer.

    7 votes
  4. Comment on Formula E: How could they improve? in ~talk

    vektor
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    Here's a simple solution to that: statistics. You normalize the votes by the votes they usually get. You could go as far as to guarantee every driver gets first, second and third each once per...

    Here's a simple solution to that: statistics. You normalize the votes by the votes they usually get. You could go as far as to guarantee every driver gets first, second and third each once per season, but that's overdoing it a bit imo and kind of defeats the purpose of the fan boost entirely but guarantees fairness. Should still be able to get it a few times more than that. Either way, what it does is it gives the boost to the driver for whom the current race is super important. Think George Russel in F1 starting from 8th important. All eyes on him, he gets a bit of a boost. I'd like that.

    1 vote
  5. Comment on The fall of Minecraft's 2b2t in ~games

    vektor
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    That's fair enough. I get that it's a deliberate choice not to ban hackers. I also think anarchy-but-no-hacking can be quite interesting, but this definitely isn't that. And if your base location...

    That's fair enough. I get that it's a deliberate choice not to ban hackers. I also think anarchy-but-no-hacking can be quite interesting, but this definitely isn't that. And if your base location can be acquired via hacks, it completely loses any leftover appeal.

    I'm also reminded of the time I built a base somewhat out of the way and completely underground, because I wanted some secrecy and there was a online map for the server. Fun times. That server didn't appreciate hacking though.

    4 votes
  6. Comment on The fall of Minecraft's 2b2t in ~games

    vektor
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    Adding the following segment from wikipedia for context that I was lacking, emphasis mine: Made your bed, now lie in it. Technically interesting, but completely expectable behavior imo.

    Adding the following segment from wikipedia for context that I was lacking, emphasis mine:

    2builders2tools (2b2t) is a Minecraft server founded in December 2010. 2b2t is the oldest anarchy server in Minecraft, as well as one of the oldest running Minecraft servers of any variety. Additionally, 2b2t's world is one of the longest-running server maps in the game, which has never been reset since its creation. As the server has virtually no rules or authority, griefing and hacking are common amongst players, with no risk of getting banned. The server is permanently set to the "hard" difficulty, and player versus player combat is enabled throughout. The server has seen over 639,000 players explore its procedurally generated map, increasing its file size to over 10.3 terabytes. 2b2t has been described in news media as the worst Minecraft server due to its playerbase and culture.

    Made your bed, now lie in it. Technically interesting, but completely expectable behavior imo.

    8 votes
  7. Comment on Everything announced at today's EA Play Live 2021 event in ~games

    vektor
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    Only think of that that interests me personally: Battlefield Portal. Sounds interesting, certainly, but I'm not sure if this is just shenanigans or whether this is halfway serious. The...

    Only think of that that interests me personally: Battlefield Portal.

    Sounds interesting, certainly, but I'm not sure if this is just shenanigans or whether this is halfway serious. The defibrillator melee and the explosive laden nonsense kind of makes me think twice, but I think it could be quite interesting to see how 2010 infantry fares against 1940 infantry, for example. I fear they're going to mess with the game balance quite a bit though, to achieve even footing... which I'm not sure how I feel about. I like some asymmetry.

    2 votes
  8. Comment on Dune | Official main trailer in ~movies

    vektor
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    I thought I remembered a militarist knucklehead in Arrival who was, well, not quite "yippee ki yay", but certainly less patient. But he definitely was relegated to a less important role. Might be...

    I thought I remembered a militarist knucklehead in Arrival who was, well, not quite "yippee ki yay", but certainly less patient. But he definitely was relegated to a less important role. Might be misremembering.

  9. Comment on War Thunder devs won’t use classified documents posted in forums to tweak tanks in ~games

    vektor
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    Classic case of "I would tell you [why you have to change the tank model this way] but then I'd have to kill you". And then he told them anyway and killed his own career and possibly freedom. I...

    Classic case of "I would tell you [why you have to change the tank model this way] but then I'd have to kill you".

    And then he told them anyway and killed his own career and possibly freedom.

    I have no words.

    TBF, it doesn't seem like it's super secret stuff. I highly doubt the major nation state adversary of UK haven't already got copies of the manual.

    6 votes
  10. Comment on Weekly coronavirus-related chat, questions, and minor updates - week of July 12 in ~health.coronavirus

    vektor
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    Yup, that's reasonable. You basically have two well-defined endpoints. If the level of immunization (from any cause) is at an equilibrium in the balance of infections vs (loss of immunity &&...

    Yup, that's reasonable. You basically have two well-defined endpoints. If the level of immunization (from any cause) is at an equilibrium in the balance of infections vs (loss of immunity && Population replacement), then it is obviously endemic. If level of immunization is zero, it's obviously epidemic/pandemic. Somewhere in between those two extremes, you're going to have to draw a line. Since the equilibrium is moving about, you're just going to have to pick a level of immunization and go with it. With the major industrial nations sitting at 40-70% vaccination (depending on if you count partly vaccinated) +X% recovered, these countries are certainly closer to endemic status than epidemic.

    I don't think it'd be unreasonable to call the pandemic over in some of those highly vaccinated countries. Then again, because of non-random vaccine distribution, there might be clusters left that are still susceptible where the disease will keep on spreading. Case numbers might prove me wrong, I suppose.

    3 votes
  11. Comment on What do you think about voting? in ~talk

    vektor
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    Oh yes. They make close elections all the more unlikely (though parties balance intentionally by splitting the electorate roughly 50/50). But they also rid you of your political passions because...

    Oh yes. They make close elections all the more unlikely (though parties balance intentionally by splitting the electorate roughly 50/50). But they also rid you of your political passions because there's no way either party is acceptable without pains to you.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on What do you think about voting? in ~talk

    vektor
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    Consider the following: The tally of the vote stands 100000 to 100001. Had you voted, it would've ended up being 100001 to 100001. This is, of course, quite unlikely. But it is also a case in...

    Consider the following: The tally of the vote stands 100000 to 100001. Had you voted, it would've ended up being 100001 to 100001. This is, of course, quite unlikely. But it is also a case in which the vote of every single non-voter would've counted a lot. The thing is that you never know ahead of time whether the vote might end up being similarly contested.

    I won't try to convince you to vote in any election where polls have established a landslide victory. But in any other case, there's a small chance that you hold heavy sway. Considering the uncertainty about the result before the vote, you can "smooth out" the probabilities here and consider that a guaranteed chance of small sway.

    Or in other words: How much would you beat yourself up if your candidate lost to the other guy by a margin of one vote, and you didn't vote? Would that be worth the gained convenience of not voting?

    4 votes
  13. Comment on You are not a visual learner: The biggest myth in education in ~humanities

    vektor
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    Oh, I absolutely think that that's a huge impact. But I also observe the hugely different ways two people can talk about a complex subject - both knowledgeable, both right, both mutually barely...

    Oh, I absolutely think that that's a huge impact. But I also observe the hugely different ways two people can talk about a complex subject - both knowledgeable, both right, both mutually barely comprehensible. This suggests to me that people will subjectively think about the same topic in wildly different ways. That makes me think that there's some amount of useful signal in the noise that is learning outcomes.

    Or frame it another way: Is the benefit of individual instruction (1 teacher - 1 student) really only that the teacher can match the pace of the student? Or is it also that a good teacher would change the way he phrases things, the demonstrations and material he chooses, or maybe even which topics to focus or omit?

    Now granted, this is hard to figure out, as I highly doubt any simple model will be able to explain the signal in the noise. So I can't fault education research for it's current stance; it's the only one currently supported by evidence. But I also believe that with the right tech, we could build a model of learning that in the end will also consider the student in more ways than just his previous grades.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on You are not a visual learner: The biggest myth in education in ~humanities

    vektor
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    Honestly, I was only modestly convinced by the evidence presented. To be fair, I was aware that learning types are a myth even before this video, so maybe that colors my perception. But to test...

    Honestly, I was only modestly convinced by the evidence presented. To be fair, I was aware that learning types are a myth even before this video, so maybe that colors my perception. But to test the myth by having students self-identify? Seems unsatisfactory to me. What would be much more convincing is to run the experiment (i.e. teaching and testing) twice. The first run can be used to infer learning types, and the second one tests that. Or in other words: You test whether what worked previously predicts what will work in the future. The more complicated you can make the "what" you test for, i.e. the learning types under consideration, the better.

    I very much doubt that there is no such thing that could be described as a learning type. How complicated those types would get though....

    5 votes
  15. Comment on Trust in software, an all time low in ~tech

    vektor
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    Yeeeah, I can certainly see that. Maybe the key word should be "consent" and "decline" here? I suspect GDPR cookie popups have had a good bit of training effect. That way, the default option would...

    Yeeeah, I can certainly see that. Maybe the key word should be "consent" and "decline" here? I suspect GDPR cookie popups have had a good bit of training effect. That way, the default option would at least be safe.

    Also a bit of a "fuck you if you don't read what you're accepting". I can appreciate the art of building software such that functionally brain dead people can operate it, but I don't have to compromise other needs to ensure that they will be protected from their own stupidity. So if someone ends up clicking consent before reading, too bad.

    2 votes
  16. Comment on Trust in software, an all time low in ~tech

    vektor
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    I think I agree with you, though I'm not sure. Here's my thought: Both options of the consent form should be treated at least equally. Putting one in a graphically suggestive form, "forgetting"...

    I think I agree with you, though I'm not sure. Here's my thought: Both options of the consent form should be treated at least equally. Putting one in a graphically suggestive form, "forgetting" one setting but not the other, making rejection harder than consent; all of these are invalid in my book.

    What is valid consent (though maybe shitty UI design, depending on how critical your telemetry is) in my book though, is a simple, blocking form. One button to reject all, one for accept all, one for detailed settings if need be. Buttons are clearly labeled, do as they should and none is given preferential treatment using e.g. UI design. Info is provided on what data is sent and stored, whether it's anonymous and whether it might be deanonymizable. If we can't have that, we might be going a bit too far here in my opinion. Consider for example the plenty of websites that we expect to store some amount of personal data.

  17. Comment on Trust in software, an all time low in ~tech

    vektor
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    Absolutely. I was thinking about that while posting. Properly anonymizing things is hard, and things as simple as your hardware spec can give a lot of information and/or decrease the number of...

    Absolutely. I was thinking about that while posting. Properly anonymizing things is hard, and things as simple as your hardware spec can give a lot of information and/or decrease the number of possible subjects of that piece of info by a factor of 100 or more.

    So I completely agree. But I also think it's possible to make telemetry for technical purposes reasonably close to properly anonymous. And there are theoretical considerations for proper anonymization that involve statistics and information theory and should (if you model your assumptions properly) give properly anonymous results. These are, however, quite restrictive in the sense that even things that no reasonable person (or 4chan sleuth) would find deanonymizable, are considered not anonymous enough.

    To give a naive shot at the macOS case, without having read the literature I mentioned in passing above, you'd ask for every library and app loaded "how much information does this give to an attacker?". At the least, a boolean feature will cut your subject list in half (at worst, it'll rule in only one individual because it's unique to that person). You'll quickly realize that only after a few dozen boolean features, you've limited the subject list to a single person, even starting from the world population.

    FWIW, the taxi database smells immediately vulnerable to me. It's got someone's adress right in there, basically.

    2 votes
  18. Comment on Trust in software, an all time low in ~tech

    vektor
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    Agree completely on the last part, but I wonder how to properly balance this with the need for not-so-sensitive not-so-identifying information for telemetry purposes. If I have my own hard- and...

    All client-side data collection should be opt-in only, with no prompts to do so unless an account is logged into. If that's not deemed acceptable, at the very least user selections to opt-out should be persisted just as much as the opt-in.

    Agree completely on the last part, but I wonder how to properly balance this with the need for not-so-sensitive not-so-identifying information for telemetry purposes. If I have my own hard- and software out there, I might want to receive logs from rare crashes, and maybe I am not able to reliably scrub identifying info from those logs, or maybe the crash logs are practically unidentifying. Should I hope that the user goes into the settings and enables telemetry?

    10 votes
  19. Comment on The e-cigarette company Juul bought an entire issue of a scholarly journal, with all the articles written by authors on its payroll, to ‘prove’ that its product has a public benefit in ~science

    vektor
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    The point is to be able to point at journal articles and say "look, we wanted to know, so we did the research and it's peer reviewed so it must be legit. You really can't fault us for not knowing...

    But who is approving this fine-print? That must surely be the place where this bullshit meets at least some resistance?

    The point is to be able to point at journal articles and say "look, we wanted to know, so we did the research and it's peer reviewed so it must be legit. You really can't fault us for not knowing our research would turn out to be wrong in the end". Which, ya know, if it wasn't so obviously corrupt, is an argument that is at least structurally sound. How else is a company supposed to make sure their product is as good as they believe it to be, if not by commissioning peer-reviewed studies?

    1 vote
  20. Comment on Time to assume that health research is fraudulent until proven otherwise? in ~science

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    Is zombie trial a term I should've heard before? Completely unknown to me, but it's used without explanation here.

    Is zombie trial a term I should've heard before? Completely unknown to me, but it's used without explanation here.

    2 votes