vektor's recent activity

  1. Comment on California will discourage students who are gifted at math in ~humanities

    vektor
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    Even in the frustrating scenario you outlined, there is a big aspect of learning to communicate abstract thought. It helps solidify and repeat topics you already understand, but it also helps a...

    Even in the frustrating scenario you outlined, there is a big aspect of learning to communicate abstract thought. It helps solidify and repeat topics you already understand, but it also helps a hell of a lot to communicate your intuition. Your intuition is damn near worthless unless you can make other people understand your point. This is particularly important for the people who understand the topic but fail at peer teaching.

    6 votes
  2. Comment on California will discourage students who are gifted at math in ~humanities

    vektor
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    I think there's plenty of research on this. My take, the last time I looked into it, was that most of intelligence is nurture rather than nature, which of course can happen for a good part at...

    "inherited" doesn't mean "innate". Wealth is inherited. Where are the money genes? Heritability for intelligence could well mean some families have the resources to increase intelligence.

    I think there's plenty of research on this. My take, the last time I looked into it, was that most of intelligence is nurture rather than nature, which of course can happen for a good part at home, thus inherited but not genetically. But there are some genetic factors iirc. This is of course not in contrast to your point: This is in fact describing that we are losing potentially "gifted students" (ewww) by not nurturing them more. Which we could be doing in the classroom.

    2 votes
  3. Comment on California will discourage students who are gifted at math in ~humanities

    vektor
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    Holy spin of a headline. Counter points to the headline, straight from the article; quotation formatting indicated quotes from the article, quotation marks indicate quotes from the report it draws...

    Holy spin of a headline.

    Counter points to the headline, straight from the article; quotation formatting indicated quotes from the article, quotation marks indicate quotes from the report it draws from:

    "The inequity of mathematics tracking in California can be undone through a coordinated approach in grades 6–12," reads a January 2021 draft of the framework. "In summary, middle-school students are best served in heterogeneous classes." In fact, the framework concludes that calculus is overvalued, even for gifted students.

    Can't say I disagree with the report. Calculus is neat and should be taught in many different college courses and, where possible, to high schoolers. But to most it is never useful in life. Therefore, to impact the education of the not-gifted in pursuit of goals useless to them, seems unfair. I also believe that keeping classes heterogeneous will help gifted students really solidify their knowledge. The act of teaching your fellow students what you've acquired is mutually beneficial.

    I'm not a huge fan of the report's language around social issues as related to math, but that might be because I read them out of context in an adverse framing by who I can only assume is an elitist asshole.

    The framing of math following is good though: "we need to broaden perceptions of mathematics beyond methods and answers so that students come to view mathematics as a connected, multi-dimensional subject that is about sense making and reasoning, to which they can contribute and belong." - I can only agree. Math is in my experience in German schools often regarded as this abstract toolbox with little relation to reality. The task of how to rephrase a real-world problem such that it is accessible with that toolbox is largely ignored and is an important skill that makes math exciting. I had to teach it myself, and I was only able to do that because of out-of-school education (by my parents) and a good amount of curiosity.

    I am generally in favor of better tailoring school subjects and emphases to students, but I don't think we're there yet, and acknowledging that some students fall behind on one of the most fundamental subjects this early is admitting defeat.

    Not a fan of the piece overall. Too much of an elitist angle. The author seems to be solely concerned with gifted students, to the extent that every mention of concern for other students seems tacked on as defense against my kind of counterpoint.

    Paging @kfwyre because this is about education and I want his opinion.

    Got more thoughts on the matter that are more detached from the concrete article, but I gotta get going.

    13 votes
  4. Comment on Deepfake lips are coming to dubbed films in ~tech

    vektor
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    It isn't only that people are too slow for subtitles. They're also distracting. And if you don't understand the language at all, more often than not, they're insufficient to give a good experience...

    It isn't only that people are too slow for subtitles. They're also distracting. And if you don't understand the language at all, more often than not, they're insufficient to give a good experience to most people. I'm not going to listen to japanese audio just because it matches the director's intent and the lip movements. I listen because I want to hear information about the plot.

    Without dubs, most people wouldn't watch US movies at all here in Germany.

    Now granted, to a purist or a fan of the director, or in some cases where language does a lot of work (Hans Landa in inglorious bastards speaking different languages e.g.) I certainly agree that you want the original, and I accept that. Dubs to German are good but I often find myself discovering minutia that were lost in translation when I watch the original afterwards. In that way I can see your stance.

    2 votes
  5. Comment on Deepfake lips are coming to dubbed films in ~tech

    vektor
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    Is there a particular reason why you want this to fail, rather than just abstaining? Because I don't think subtitles are going away due to this. With video on demand these days, you can just watch...

    Is there a particular reason why you want this to fail, rather than just abstaining? Because I don't think subtitles are going away due to this. With video on demand these days, you can just watch the version you want with the subtitles you want. If I'm on netflix, I don't have to watch the German dubs, I can just watch in English and add subtitles if the actors are hard to understand. I would imagine this wouldn't be any different if this caught on. I could just watch the original, if that's what I wanted and add some subtitles.

    5 votes
  6. Comment on The chip shortage keeps getting worse. Why can't we just make more? in ~tech

    vektor
    Link Parent
    To add to what stu2b50 said, I imagine that companies have different willingness to pay extra for on-time delivery. Apple for example has substantial financial weight to throw around, and loyal...

    To add to what stu2b50 said, I imagine that companies have different willingness to pay extra for on-time delivery. Apple for example has substantial financial weight to throw around, and loyal customers that demand their products be available. Add on that apple is (according to my completely-out-the-ass estimate) the electronics company with the widest profit margin, and they can afford to pay extra. PS5s are much lower-grade products (not saying they're not worth it or anything) that are built to a price. They are engineered so that they can be cranked out in huge quantities for relatively cheap. Add on that Sony seems to want to hold on to their previous price promises I think, and they were probably previously already on the slimmest of margins because they want the consoles cheap so they can sell lots of games, and they just can't budge that much.

    4 votes
  7. Comment on The chip shortage keeps getting worse. Why can't we just make more? in ~tech

    vektor
    Link Parent
    Also people equipping themselves for remote work. I imagine that a lot of desk workers have corporate laptops that didn't have them before.

    Also people equipping themselves for remote work. I imagine that a lot of desk workers have corporate laptops that didn't have them before.

    5 votes
  8. Comment on Armed doesn't mean dangerous: Black gun owners are often portrayed negatively. One photographer set out to change that. in ~misc

    vektor
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    To give a german perspective here: Our cops are (I think) universally armed. Every time you meet a cop in uniform, you can assume he has a sidearm. You can also assume that bigger guns are in the...

    To give a german perspective here: Our cops are (I think) universally armed. Every time you meet a cop in uniform, you can assume he has a sidearm. You can also assume that bigger guns are in the car. The german population is mostly unarmed (1/6 the guns per capita compared to US) and actively carrying is basically unheard of.

    And that's ok. Because the police use their guns responsibly. (They don't use some of their other powers as responsibly, we do have some problems there, but it's a sunshine and rainbows in comparison) Demanding the police disarm when the population is heavily armed is not going to work well. The whole "any person could pull a gun on me anytime" fear of police officers is not in itself irrational in the US. Meanwhile, in germany you do have armed cops because you occasionally get armed criminals even if the population is generally unarmed. I'm not sure cops universally carrying is strictly necessary in this context, but I don't think it's doing a lot of harm either, so we're chasing a very small effect here either way. The much bigger effect would be police culture, the system of internal affairs investigations, legal constraints, etc. And these are alive and well over here.

    All this to say that I don't think cops carrying guns is a problem. It's the widespread use of those guns that is.

    8 votes
  9. Comment on Is there anything considered pseudoscientific/unscientific that you suspect has some truth to it and might be re-examined in the future? in ~talk

    vektor
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    The more I read your original statement the more it makes sense. Maybe it's also helpful to think of it as a kind of bias/variance tradeoff (maybe not to the most technical definition of those two...

    The more I read your original statement the more it makes sense. Maybe it's also helpful to think of it as a kind of bias/variance tradeoff (maybe not to the most technical definition of those two terms): by increasing noisiness/pseudo-random behavour (variance), you're decreasing overfitting (bias).

    4 votes
  10. Comment on Is there anything considered pseudoscientific/unscientific that you suspect has some truth to it and might be re-examined in the future? in ~talk

    vektor
    Link Parent
    Off topic, but that's a unusual perspective on regularization imo. Would you care to elaborate? My education told me that regularization was about preventing overfitting. But the theory was not at...

    Off topic, but that's a unusual perspective on regularization imo. Would you care to elaborate?

    My education told me that regularization was about preventing overfitting. But the theory was not at all about promoting pseudo-random behaviour, but iirc rather that it was about eliminating spurious effects from weights that are unsupported by evidence. Kind of like pruning in decision trees. To be fair, I don't quite remember the justification for regularization, but it wasn't that.

    Edit bc clumsy wording.

    3 votes
  11. Comment on Is there anything considered pseudoscientific/unscientific that you suspect has some truth to it and might be re-examined in the future? in ~talk

    vektor
    Link Parent
    It also determines the season of your birth. There might be an effect of seasons on infant development, possibly communicated through other factors like general human activity. Of course, a useful...

    It also determines the season of your birth. There might be an effect of seasons on infant development, possibly communicated through other factors like general human activity.

    Of course, a useful control would be people in a similar climate in the opposite hemisphere. If your behavioural patterns match the offset-by-6-months group in the other hemisphere, rather than your zodiac in the other hemisphere, then it's a bingo.

    But with the other hemisphere, cultural factors will probably throw off any results too. Urgh.

    10 votes
  12. Comment on Let's talk about attention in ~talk

    vektor
    (edited )
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    I think this thread is lacking answers from more neurotypical(?) people to the question "how would you describe your attention/focus to someone who experiences theirs in a different way." Anyone...

    I think this thread is lacking answers from more neurotypical(?) people to the question "how would you describe your attention/focus to someone who experiences theirs in a different way." Anyone got anything?

    E: To clarify, this is such that people who lack the context or terminology to share their own views have a bit better starting point. I'd really like to hear how neurotypical people would describe theirs, because I don't quite know where I fit in here. (And I have a hard enough time verbalizing this anyway.)

    5 votes
  13. Comment on Caitlyn Jenner opposes trans girls competing in girls' sports: 'It just isn't fair' in ~lgbt

    vektor
    Link Parent
    Wait, just to clarify: F1 drivers deliberately train their neck muscles. Their idea of a workout is getting their head yoinked side to side with a rubber band. Are you claiming that the dimorphism...

    Wait, just to clarify: F1 drivers deliberately train their neck muscles. Their idea of a workout is getting their head yoinked side to side with a rubber band. Are you claiming that the dimorphism is such that this does not matter at all? I.e. are you claiming that neck muscles (different from any other skeletal muscle I could think of) do not grow better with high testosterone? Or are you claiming that because we're looking at the tail of a distribution, we can't know? (in which case, why the difference to other skeletal muscles, where we do see the effect?)

    Now, I could believe, with some evidence, that with some workout the requisite neck strength can be achieved by women too. I mean, there's no point in being better than necessary (different from other sports where more muscle is more good), so if that point of sufficiency is far outside the norm (we know that) but within reach for an athlete, then women should be able to compete at top level. I can also believe that motorsports is sufficiently sexist to explain the difference. I don't agree with you calling the above point absurd. (!)

    Also, neck strain on astronauts is way less. That's a cozy 3g or so for a few minutes, with a cozy head rest. It's mostly strain on the cardiovascular system, I imagine. Compare F1: Shitty/No headrest, higher forces, for something like 1.5-2 hours; intervals depending on the track layout. I believe my neck could do the astronaut job (maybe not my heart though). I don't for a second believe I could drive an F1 car.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on Caitlyn Jenner opposes trans girls competing in girls' sports: 'It just isn't fair' in ~lgbt

    vektor
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    Oh, certainly. You need some serious neck muscles. But I don't think that explains the disparity. Not sure though.

    Oh, certainly. You need some serious neck muscles. But I don't think that explains the disparity. Not sure though.

    1 vote
  15. Comment on Caitlyn Jenner opposes trans girls competing in girls' sports: 'It just isn't fair' in ~lgbt

    vektor
    Link Parent
    Isn't that kind of the point? The special olympics are interesting to watch because they are segregated from the rest. If special atheletes would have to compete with able-bodied athletes, they...

    The Special Olympics could be considered low rank games.

    Isn't that kind of the point? The special olympics are interesting to watch because they are segregated from the rest. If special atheletes would have to compete with able-bodied athletes, they would not stand a chance (or where they would, it would only be because of "unfair" aids that would be inadmissible for able-bodied athletes. It wouldn't be interesting to watch, because they would not be able to compete. In an integrated league, special athletes compete in C league, and no one watches C league. Same for women: Integrate it, and women can not complete at A level, so at C level you start to see women. But no one watches that, and there being women won't change that a lot. Seeing a bunch of women compete in a very competitive environment where they aren't being outclassed by C-league men is fun. Seeing the best woman sprinter get outclassed by a mediocre male athlete isn't. (* Not claiming Joe Average could outrun the world's best woman sprinter, but there are likely 1000s of men who can.)

    Which is why we segregate most sports. (Still wonder why there's no women in F1, as the sexual dimorphism doesn't explain this one well. Probably sexism in the motorsport world, I suppose.)

    Anyway, in amateur ranks, the calculation is different as you stated. Not sure if the lower stakes mean we should integrate, or whether the higher focus on competition (as opposed to viewership) means we should keep them separated.

    6 votes
  16. Comment on SSD manufacturers start warning that mining proof-of-space blockchains like Chia Coin will void warranty in ~tech

    vektor
    Link Parent
    The hardware manufacturer who thinks this is a fad. Capacity has to be used to be economically viable.

    The hardware manufacturer who thinks this is a fad. Capacity has to be used to be economically viable.

    3 votes
  17. Comment on The clockwork universe: A growing chorus of scientists and philosophers argue that free will does not exist in ~humanities

    vektor
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    What convinced me of a position not unlike yours is the question: Does it matter? Does it matter that in every parallel universe given the same situation I would make the same decision? Nahh. The...

    What convinced me of a position not unlike yours is the question: Does it matter?

    Does it matter that in every parallel universe given the same situation I would make the same decision? Nahh. The only other alternative is that I would be a stochastic process that produced genuinely random actions.

    Does it matter that I have no other choice, physically, but to decide this or that way? No, because the decisions I make are not forced upon me by an external power, but by my own wants and reasoning. I act this way, because I want to, which is what matters. The fact that my wants were always going to be this or that is of no import to my happiness. (This of course applies only to restrictions of my actions based on e.g. physical determinism as opposed to e.g. slavery. Slavery is markedly different because my decisions are necessarily distorted from my wants.

    Does it matter that the murderer had no choice? Well, not really. The point of consequences isn't merely to punish people for making shitty choices. It's also a deterrent to others (and prevention of reoffense) and a protection from people who do more harm than the rest. All these still work. A person who is held to account will be less likely to reoffend because this will factor, on a physically deterministic level, into their decision making process the next time. Seeing other people held to account will do the same. (the discussion how effective each of the components mentioned are, is an entirely separate one, albeit very interesting too.)

    10 votes
  18. Comment on Academic surveillance software company Proctorio is suing a researcher critical of them, seeking to obtain private communications in ~tech

    vektor
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    Meanwhile, covid-era exams over here in germany (I do not claim this is representative): "Yeah, here's the exam, there's the moodle form you use to submit your answers. You've got 4-5 hours for a...

    Meanwhile, covid-era exams over here in germany (I do not claim this is representative): "Yeah, here's the exam, there's the moodle form you use to submit your answers. You've got 4-5 hours for a 2-hour test because we can't guarantee the servers are up 100% of that time. Please list any sources you used. Good luck." Zero surveillance.

    Did people cheat? Probably. Do I care? Nahh. This isn't a difficult exam, and it isn't the kind of stuff that will break your back if you're "unworthy" of the degree. The exams can tell the student they're "unworthy", as can many other aspects of studying. The measurement teachers should use to award a degree or not are (imo) not the kind of exams you can cheat on (save for copying other's work). The skills required are much better displayed in a thesis, a project or similar.

    4 votes
  19. Comment on Academic surveillance software company Proctorio is suing a researcher critical of them, seeking to obtain private communications in ~tech

    vektor
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    Oh fuck off. That alone should be cause enough to not give them any access to private communications. What the fuck.

    Oh fuck off. That alone should be cause enough to not give them any access to private communications. What the fuck.

    9 votes
  20. Comment on Search for tag site-wide? in ~tildes

    vektor
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    Oh yeah, that's it. Don't think I did that, was that perhaps off-by-default for some reason?

    Oh yeah, that's it. Don't think I did that, was that perhaps off-by-default for some reason?

    2 votes