9 votes

The three best ways to cook steak

Tags: meat, steak, howto

10 comments

  1. CharlieConway
    Link
    I've been reverse searing my steaks for a few years now and find it to be the most reliable cooking method. It also doesn't require any specialized equipment beyond a wire rack which is a big plus...

    I've been reverse searing my steaks for a few years now and find it to be the most reliable cooking method. It also doesn't require any specialized equipment beyond a wire rack which is a big plus in my book.

    This may not apply to many people here but the short time it takes to sear in the skillet is also ideal for apartments or homes with sensitive smoke detectors or inadequate stovetop ventilation.

    4 votes
  2. [8]
    tomf
    Link
    I like the idea of a sous vide, but I'd never bother with one for home. Can you use a ziploc, submerging the bag in water up to the seal, then sealing it so it's faux-vacuum sealed? For the other...

    I like the idea of a sous vide, but I'd never bother with one for home. Can you use a ziploc, submerging the bag in water up to the seal, then sealing it so it's faux-vacuum sealed?

    For the other two, I always reverse sear thicker steaks but butter baste thinner ones... if I'm making steak for other people.

    For me, I'm all about the ol' black and blue / Pittsburgh rare. I've used my baking steel on my BBQ (cranked) to get a crazy good sear. I haven't done it like this dude, but I do get a similar result.

    3 votes
    1. [5]
      Akir
      Link Parent
      Yes. In fact that is the most commonly recommended method for home chefs. As long as you don't have any big air bubbles you will be fine.

      Can you use a ziploc, submerging the bag in water up to the seal, then sealing it so it's faux-vacuum sealed?

      Yes. In fact that is the most commonly recommended method for home chefs. As long as you don't have any big air bubbles you will be fine.

      5 votes
      1. [4]
        tomf
        Link Parent
        oh nice. That's not too bad. I have now promoted sous vide up to 'neutral'. It could be handy. I'm typically against 'gadgets', but it seems like it'd be handy for larger meals.

        oh nice. That's not too bad. I have now promoted sous vide up to 'neutral'.

        It could be handy. I'm typically against 'gadgets', but it seems like it'd be handy for larger meals.

        1 vote
        1. [3]
          emdash
          Link Parent
          Sous vide makes steaks looks pretty gross, though. It cooks them perfectly, but presentationally it's a bit of a disaster. You need a good blowtorch or a quick 1 minute sear in a hot skillet to...

          Sous vide makes steaks looks pretty gross, though. It cooks them perfectly, but presentationally it's a bit of a disaster. You need a good blowtorch or a quick 1 minute sear in a hot skillet to really get that nice browning on the exterior once it's removed from the vacuum pack.

          4 votes
          1. [2]
            tomf
            Link Parent
            Torching is my love language. I've been going down the rabbit hole with this. Some folks had issues with a bad smell (lactobacillus), but one site suggested a 30 second 'scald' with boiling water....

            Torching is my love language.

            I've been going down the rabbit hole with this. Some folks had issues with a bad smell (lactobacillus), but one site suggested a 30 second 'scald' with boiling water. Boiling seems like a bit much and I think it would die above 130˚F -- but I'd have to test that.

            I'm still not sold on the entire process. My goal this month is to find someone who has one, so I can give it a spin.

            4 votes
            1. wundumguy
              Link Parent
              You can get one for under a hundred bucks. You don't need a blow torch. And just wait till you learn that you can make brisket with one

              You can get one for under a hundred bucks. You don't need a blow torch. And just wait till you learn that you can make brisket with one

              1 vote
    2. [2]
      ffmike
      Link Parent
      You can also get a cheap-ass handheld food sealer and a few bags to test for around $30 at Walmart. I find that works a little better than the "press air out" method, though maybe not enough to be...

      You can also get a cheap-ass handheld food sealer and a few bags to test for around $30 at Walmart. I find that works a little better than the "press air out" method, though maybe not enough to be worth the bother. Cheaper than the thermal countertop ones though.

      This also assumes that you don't mind shopping at Walmart, and that having another single-use gadget around won't upset you.

      3 votes
      1. tomf
        Link Parent
        I don't mind walmart, but its the plastic that will kill my near-zero-waste vibe :) For this sort of thing, I simply do water displacement, like this. I don't use as much water though --- Kenji's...

        I don't mind walmart, but its the plastic that will kill my near-zero-waste vibe :)

        For this sort of thing, I simply do water displacement, like this. I don't use as much water though --- Kenji's video is overkill.

        If I do go down the sous vide route, I'll demote vacuum seal water to plant watering water, then reuse the bags for years and years.

        1 vote
  3. joplin
    Link
    Wow! I gotta try this. Looks like we're having steaks this week. 😉 I'm going to give reverse-searing a try. Should be interesting.

    Wow! I gotta try this. Looks like we're having steaks this week. 😉 I'm going to give reverse-searing a try. Should be interesting.

    1 vote