16 votes

The Loneliness Epidemic

8 comments

  1. emdash (edited ) Link
    I highly recommend watching this video by Matt D'Avella interviewing Johann Hari regarding societal depression, loneliness, and how social media, internet, & advertising has begun to act as a...

    I highly recommend watching this video by Matt D'Avella interviewing Johann Hari regarding societal depression, loneliness, and how social media, internet, & advertising has begun to act as a proxy pseudo-replacement for real social interactions and real needs, and how it's making western society sick.

    3 votes
  2. [7]
    user2 Link
    On minute 19, he mentions a study of the effect of ads in a child. Does anyone have a link to this study?

    On minute 19, he mentions a study of the effect of ads in a child. Does anyone have a link to this study?

    2 votes
    1. [6]
      cfabbro Link Parent
      From his book on page 100: And on page 286 he cites his sources for that section: Link to 1978 Study: https://www.jstor.org/stable/2488960

      From his book on page 100:

      There’s an experiment, by a different group of social scientists, that gives us one early clue. In 1978, two Canadian social scientists got a bunch of four and five year old kids and divided them into two groups. The first group was shown no commercials. The second group was shown two commercials for a particular toy. Then they offered these four or five year old kids a choice. They told them: You have to choose, now, to play with one of these two boys here. You can play with this little boy who has the toy from the commercials, but we have to warn you, he’s not a nice boy. He’s mean. Or you can play with a boy who doesn’t have the toy, but who is really nice.

      If they had seen the commercial for the toy, the kids mostly chose to play with the mean boy with the toy. If they hadn’t seen the commercial, they mostly chose to play with the nice boy who had no toys.

      In other words, the advertisements led them to choose an inferior human connection over a superior human connection, because they’d been primed to think that a lump of plastic is what really matters.

      And on page 286 he cites his sources for that section:

      Marvin E. Goldberg Gerald J. Gorn "Some Unintended Consequences of TV Advertising to Children" Journal of Consumer Research, Volume 5, Issue 1, June 1978, Pages 22–29; Kasser, High Price of Materialism, 66; Kasser, Materialistic Values, 499; S. E. G. Lea et al., The Individual in the Economy: A Textbook of Economic Psychology (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987), 397; Kasser, ed., Psychology and Consumer Culture, 16-18.

      Link to 1978 Study:
      https://www.jstor.org/stable/2488960

      3 votes
      1. [5]
        user2 Link Parent
        Nice! Did you read his book?

        Nice! Did you read his book?

        1 vote
        1. [4]
          cfabbro Link Parent
          Nope, just did some digging on google books and amazon preview search (to find the citations) because I was curious about the source of his story too. Unfortunately I couldn't find a PDF of the...

          Nope, just did some digging on google books and amazon preview search (to find the citations) because I was curious about the source of his story too. Unfortunately I couldn't find a PDF of the study anywhere though, so it came to an end rather abruptly after reading the abstract, since I'm not about to pay $16 to satiate it. ;)

          1. [3]
            user2 Link Parent
            Sci-hub should help, though it is giving me an error: https://sci-hub.tw/https://www.jstor.org/stable/2488960?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

            Sci-hub should help, though it is giving me an error:

            https://sci-hub.tw/https://www.jstor.org/stable/2488960?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

            1 vote
            1. [2]
              cfabbro Link Parent
              Ah sweet, thanks, it worked fine for me. Table 2 image p.s. Since sci-hub isn't working for you, if you want to still read it.

              Ah sweet, thanks, it worked fine for me.

              Not only did the commercial seem to induce the children to play with the toy, but it also appeared to increase the likelihood that they would disregard the negative ("not-so-nice") characteristics of a boy who supposedly had the toy. While 70 percent of the control group opted for the nice boy rather than the boy who was "not-so-nice" but had the Ruckus Raisers Barn, the percentages dropped significantly for children ex- posed to the Ruckus Raisers commercial on a single day, to only 35 percent initially and 49 percent one day later (see Table 2).

              Table 2 image

              p.s. Since sci-hub isn't working for you, if you want to still read it.

              1 vote