21 votes

Why You Should Start a Blog Right Now

10 comments

  1. lepigpen
    Link
    Agree, although article seems to over complicate the concept while simultaneously saying 'its easy, just do it'. I guess those 5 words don't constitute a compelling article, but they could. It's...

    Agree, although article seems to over complicate the concept while simultaneously saying 'its easy, just do it'. I guess those 5 words don't constitute a compelling article, but they could. It's honest lol

    I started a blogger.com years and years ago and although I no longer write in it, basically treated it as a type of journal, to this day I regard it as INVALUABLE in terms of self development and ironing out concepts of time and maturation (personality change). That blog has gone through 3 cars, 3 jobs, 2 girlfriends, and much much more. It can either be used as a utility to remember dates of certain events or it can be used emotionally as a testament to my willpower through time, keeping my head high after so many failures and lifestyle changes.

    Also, back when blogs were actually a thing, I started a surf blog that gained a small following and through that experience I ended up working at a surf website for 3 years.

    So yes, no matter what your reason or usage, a blog is a terrific concept. And I believe the greatest version of it is a private, personal blog that can be utilized for one's own personal needs through out time. Social media (mostly facebook) bastardized the concept of a personal or at least tight knit online experience that could be used to gain self awareness. Instead we now have the exact opposite, we portray unrealistic versions of ourselves to larger audiences in order to curate a fake reality to live in. Ancient philosophers are rolling in their graves at our inability to appreciate the simple concept of the 'self'.

    9 votes
  2. [2]
    ubergeek
    Link
    I struggled with maintaining a blog that is done through a web ui, mainly because it really didn't fit in with my workflow. So, once I started using the feels engine available on most tilde...

    I struggled with maintaining a blog that is done through a web ui, mainly because it really didn't fit in with my workflow.

    So, once I started using the feels engine available on most tilde servers (Not tildes.net), I tend to blog more frequently now.

    I guess a take-away from this: Try a "slower" form of blogging: Use a text editor to compose them offline, and then once in a while, upload them? That tends to help me keep at it more regularly.

    7 votes
    1. hook
      Link Parent
      I very much agree. Also, there is no need to push yourself to blog on a regular weekly (or even daily!) time schedule. Well, unless that is your work. For maintaining a blog, static blog...

      I very much agree. Also, there is no need to push yourself to blog on a regular weekly (or even daily!) time schedule. Well, unless that is your work.

      For maintaining a blog, static blog generators (e.g. Pelican) are perhaps a tiny bit harder to learn to use initially, bu the easiest to maintain. Especially since even if you forget to update the software for years, there is no security risk, as it is all just HTML.

      2 votes
  3. [3]
    kate
    Link
    All good reasons to start a blog. However, if you’re interested in improving your writing & getting to know yourself better, instead of building an audience, it would be easier to just journal.

    All good reasons to start a blog. However, if you’re interested in improving your writing & getting to know yourself better, instead of building an audience, it would be easier to just journal.

    6 votes
    1. imperialismus
      Link Parent
      Exactly. Why make it public? If the point was to think more clearly by putting it in writing, make a private journal. I ran a rather successful personal blog and, although I started it not...

      Exactly. Why make it public? If the point was to think more clearly by putting it in writing, make a private journal. I ran a rather successful personal blog and, although I started it not intending to reveal anything too private, over time, I ended up gradually opening up until the point where there's now things on the internet that I'd very much like to remove, but can't. I let myself fall into the trap of "one detail doesn't matter" until the sum of details is rather more personal than I'd like to publish to the general public.

      I also ran a less personal blog that was even more successful. I didn't do it to gain connections or money, I did it for fun. But in the end it became a stress factor, and I was never able to leverage it into any gains to my economy or career. I wouldn't take it back, because I enjoyed it and I think I provided value to a lot of people. If I could have a do-over, I wouldn't not do it, but would I want to do it again? I've had a couple of years without blogging after a decade of doing so quite successfully, and I don't see why I would want to start again. I'd have to have a plan to make sure I could actually benefit from it more materially than I did.

      7 votes
    2. Akir
      Link Parent
      That's exactly what I was thinking. Journaling has the added benefit of there being no way for you to accidentally publish information that can be used to aid in identity theft.

      That's exactly what I was thinking. Journaling has the added benefit of there being no way for you to accidentally publish information that can be used to aid in identity theft.

      3 votes
  4. [2]
    Archimedes
    Link
    It's a great idea but feels impossible for me to stick to longer than a couple of weeks, especially when I feel like I need to produce something unique (to me). The only things I tend to stick to...

    It's a great idea but feels impossible for me to stick to longer than a couple of weeks, especially when I feel like I need to produce something unique (to me). The only things I tend to stick to involve interaction with others, otherwise I just lose steam.

    5 votes
    1. hook
      Link Parent
      No need to keep shoveling out content on a regular schedule. Write when you feel like it.

      No need to keep shoveling out content on a regular schedule. Write when you feel like it.

      5 votes
  5. welly
    Link
    A ran a photography blog for years, which had a strong following in the niche area of photography I used to blog about (large format, traditional photography). It gave me the opportunity to meet...

    A ran a photography blog for years, which had a strong following in the niche area of photography I used to blog about (large format, traditional photography). It gave me the opportunity to meet and work with some very highly reknowned and respected photographers in that particular area of photography which is something I never expected when I started the blog. I no longer run it but have been thinking about starting blogging again, on a different subject, as I did enjoy writing even though I'm certainly not from a journalism background. It's a fairly easy creative outlet as all you need is a laptop/tablet/desktop computer (or even just a pen and notepad).

    As an aside, this guy's "Why You Should Join Twitter Right Now" post doesn't give any reasons why you should join twitter right now.

    3 votes
  6. HanakoIsBestGirl
    Link
    A journal / diary seems a lot more convenient, private and allows you to be more honest

    A journal / diary seems a lot more convenient, private and allows you to be more honest

    1 vote