imperialismus's recent activity

  1. Comment on Netflix stock price drops 35%, posting biggest fall since 2004 in ~finance

    imperialismus
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    At least internationally, this was kind of how it started. When Netflix launched in my country, it was the only streaming service available that wasn't the national broadcaster, and the national...

    The notion that you could stream everything on Netflix was never real.

    At least internationally, this was kind of how it started. When Netflix launched in my country, it was the only streaming service available that wasn't the national broadcaster, and the national broadcaster pretty much only had domestic programming. So the only alternatives were piracy or the 'Flix. It was basically a one-stop-shop for all legal international shows and films, everything else was at best torrents or shady porn-ad-infested illegal sharing sites. Since then, it feels like half the content/IPs available on Netflix then have disappeared to ten different streaming services, some of which aren't even legally available here. And at least half of the new stuff as well.

    It's not anyone's fault. It's not Netflix's fault that other media companies started demanding outrageous fees or outright refusing to renew licenses. It's not the media companies' fault that they realized they could make more money with their own streaming services and did so. And it's not the customers' fault that they were conditioned to the idea that all streaming content would be available either on Youtube for free or Netflix for exactly one reasonably priced monthly payment. But it certainly is a problem for Netflix as a company that, in many markets, they were the only company filling a certain niche and now that niche is filled with ten different companies and they're fragmenting the subscriber base.

    4 votes
  2. Comment on ‘We're making wine in Norway’ – climate change is pushing vineyards further north and south towards the poles in ~food

    imperialismus
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    My point was rather that they're competing for attention with a product that is from the same region, fills a similar niche, and has a lot more resources going into promoting it. Not that a new...

    My point was rather that they're competing for attention with a product that is from the same region, fills a similar niche, and has a lot more resources going into promoting it. Not that a new wine region prime facie can't arise.

    3 votes
  3. Comment on ‘We're making wine in Norway’ – climate change is pushing vineyards further north and south towards the poles in ~food

    imperialismus
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    Interesting from a climate change perspective, I guess. But I don't see Norwegian wine becoming a hit internationally. There's a big push from both market forces and the government to make...

    Interesting from a climate change perspective, I guess. But I don't see Norwegian wine becoming a hit internationally. There's a big push from both market forces and the government to make Norwegian cider an international brand. Cider from the Hardangerfjord (the next big fjord to the south of the Sognefjord on the map) has a Protected Geographic Indication status, like, say, Italian mozzarella, and it's got a much longer history. If you want to sell premium alcoholic beverages, it really helps to be able to say "we've been doing this for hundreds of years, this is our cultural heritage."

    3 votes
  4. Comment on Megathread: April Fools' Day 2022 on the internet in ~misc

    imperialismus
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    Hackers leak lichess source code I think someone did this joke before with Linux, but it's still mildly amusing.

    Hackers leak lichess source code

    I think someone did this joke before with Linux, but it's still mildly amusing.

    11 votes
  5. Comment on "...more than half of our members globally tuned into [anime] last year" - Netflix Anime Director in ~anime

    imperialismus
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    They're doing their part to cure English native speakers of their phobia of subtitles. Although many non-English shows still get English dubs, I've seen more and more people say they prefer the...

    They're doing their part to cure English native speakers of their phobia of subtitles. Although many non-English shows still get English dubs, I've seen more and more people say they prefer the original audio (which I've always considered the superior option, but then again I grew up watching subtitles).

    5 votes
  6. Comment on Bruce Willis, diagnosed with aphasia, steps away from acting in ~movies

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    A few years ago, my father had a stroke. I went with him to be hospital, and when he arrived in the ambulance, he had lost all ability to speak except for the words "yes" and "no". But he could...
    • Exemplary

    A few years ago, my father had a stroke. I went with him to be hospital, and when he arrived in the ambulance, he had lost all ability to speak except for the words "yes" and "no". But he could still perfectly understand everything that was said to him. It was pretty terrifying to witness, and must have been even worse to experience. Thankfully, he was able to make an almost complete recovery, but there is still some residual aphasia.

    My dad is still able to do his job, which involves a lot of talking all day. Most of his colleagues probably don't notice anything. It's mostly when he gets tired that it becomes apparent. You know that feeling when you know what you want to say, the word is at the tip of your tongue, but you've temporarily forgotten it? Everyone experiences that occasionally. My father experiences it far more frequently than the average person. It can be very frustrating. There's so many times when he has to stop in the middle of a sentence to think of a word, and he goes, "don't say it" - we can usually guess the word from context - "let me think of it."

    He also mixes up words. Sometimes it's antonyms - hot instead of cold, high instead of low. Sometimes it's substituting one word for a different word that belongs to the same category of things - apple instead of banana, wrench instead of hammer.

    But through it all, it didn't affect his intellect. He's still as clever as ever, albeit more prone to fatigue. My father's case is fairly mild, aside from during the stroke itself. It's purely expressive, meaning it affects only production of speech, not comprehension. It's also not progressive: it was caused by brain damage during the stroke, and once that was treated, no additional damage occurred. It won't get worse with time, but could potentially get better. There are many different forms of aphasia, with different causes and different prognoses. If it's the result of a one-time event like a stroke or head trauma, it doesn't get worse over time. If it's caused by some other neurodegenerative disease, it could get worse over time, and other symptoms could follow.

    I haven't really talked about this to anyone outside of my family, but I figured I'd share my perspective. I don't know what's the cause of Willis' aphasia, whether it affects comprehension/production/both, how severe it is, whether it will get worse over time. But I've witnessed how frustrating it can be even in a mild form.

    17 votes
  7. Comment on Bruce Willis, diagnosed with aphasia, steps away from acting in ~movies

    imperialismus
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    Aphasia is a symptom, usually caused by something else. It's a bit like saying "he doesn't have a traumatic head injury, he has a headache". Aphasia could be the symptom of some other...

    [1] Note: the rumours were dementia, he doesn't seem to have dementia, the family is saying it is specifically aphasia

    Aphasia is a symptom, usually caused by something else. It's a bit like saying "he doesn't have a traumatic head injury, he has a headache". Aphasia could be the symptom of some other neurodegenerative disease, head trauma, or stroke. Even in the rare cases of primary progressive aphasia, that is considered a form of frontotemporal dementia. We don't know what caused the aphasia in this case. Depending on the cause, it could be the start of more serious symptoms or it might be as bad as it's ever going to get already.

    10 votes
  8. Comment on What do revolutionary new Sudoku techniques teach us about real-world problem solving? in ~games

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    I've watched a few videos from the Cracking the Cryptic channel, which is mentioned in the article. I've only ever solved a few easy sudokus myself, but for some reason it's really satisfying to...

    I've watched a few videos from the Cracking the Cryptic channel, which is mentioned in the article. I've only ever solved a few easy sudokus myself, but for some reason it's really satisfying to watch a master solving fiendishly difficult ones. My favorite video of theirs that I've watched has to be this one, which features an anti-sudoku. The puzzle is constructed such that normal sudoku rules cannot apply. I think it's one of, if not the longest solve on the channel.

    I think it ties into what the article is saying about ontological remodeling. You can tell how hard it is, even for a very skilled solver, because none of the usual tricks apply. But you can also watch the pure joy as Simon figures out some unstated rules that follow from the premise, but are not explicitly stated.

    Like I said, I don't really solve sudokus. But I do solve a lot of chess puzzles, and there's definitely some overlap with what the article is talking about. My least favorite type of chess puzzle is pawn endgames, because I'm so bad at them. Seemingly, they should be the easiest kind of puzzle (except maybe trivial checkmates), because there's so few pieces on the board. Only kings and pawns. No tricky knights jumping around or queens that can whizz around the board. But they're actually really, really difficult. Often they require you to calculate many, many moves down the line very precisely. They are much trickier than many positions that have a bunch of different pieces on the board.

    However, there are many, many different techniques that apply to such seemingly simple positions. Sometimes, solving a puzzle can be fiendishly difficult if you haven't internalized the pattern, but if you have, it's only a matter of recognizing it, and then the actual solve is a straightforward application of a memorized pattern. Things like triangulation or corresponding squares. These concepts are nowhere to be found in the rules of chess - yet they follow logically from them. You need a new vocabulary to describe them.

    4 votes
  9. Comment on The metaverse is so stupid in ~tech

    imperialismus
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    That makes sense. I was fairly sure Facebook didn't invent the term, but I kind of assumed they wouldn't go all in on it without having a stranglehold on the IP rights for any adjacent...

    That makes sense. I was fairly sure Facebook didn't invent the term, but I kind of assumed they wouldn't go all in on it without having a stranglehold on the IP rights for any adjacent application.

    Anyway, my broader point is that any competing technology will probably avoid using the same name as Meta, whether that is to avoid legal complications or simply to avoid confusing branding. Which means unless Facebook's metaverse succeeds, then the future of the internet will probably be known by another name.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on The metaverse is so stupid in ~tech

    imperialismus
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    If anything, the fact that Zuckerberg has presumably trademarked/patented the term means whatever the next paradigm of the internet will be, it will not be called the metaverse.

    I do believe that something called "the metaverse" will likely emerge in the next decade or so.

    If anything, the fact that Zuckerberg has presumably trademarked/patented the term means whatever the next paradigm of the internet will be, it will not be called the metaverse.

    8 votes
  11. Comment on <deleted topic> in ~tech

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    What's the point of posting this article, exactly? Theranos was a scam. The article could have made a poignant point about the poor quality of tech journalism, hailing someone as a savior all the...

    What's the point of posting this article, exactly? Theranos was a scam. The article could have made a poignant point about the poor quality of tech journalism, hailing someone as a savior all the way until an actual investigative journalist does the job of exposing the scam. But it didn't, really. Instead it pretends that the scam is just a small hiccup made up by the need for a media "narrative", and predicts that the company, which would go bust a couple of years later, will only come back stronger. No surprise it's written by a startup bro.

    Theranos wasn't crucified in the press because startups are now regarded as the elite, which needs to be taken down a peg. The tech press continues to praise startups. It was crucified because it sold a product which didn't exist by pushing outright lies. The shitty thing isn't that the press turned on Elizabeth Holmes, it's that they bought into her scam in the first place.

    12 votes
  12. Comment on Awesome Games Done Quick 2022 has raised $3,416,729 for the Prevent Cancer Foundation in ~games

    imperialismus
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    Is it online again? I actually really liked it that way. I imagine it's great fun for the people who get to attend, but as a spectator from home, the crowd is an annoyance more often than it adds...

    Is it online again? I actually really liked it that way. I imagine it's great fun for the people who get to attend, but as a spectator from home, the crowd is an annoyance more often than it adds to the atmosphere.

    6 votes
  13. Comment on Dolly Parton - Jolene (Destructo Remix) (2021) in ~music

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    To my mind, the greatest ever cover of this song is the White Stripes version. It sounds completely different and yet somehow expresses the emotion of the original way more intensely.

    To my mind, the greatest ever cover of this song is the White Stripes version. It sounds completely different and yet somehow expresses the emotion of the original way more intensely.

    3 votes
  14. Comment on Hi, how are you? Mental health support and discussion thread (December 2021) in ~talk

    imperialismus
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    Aww, that's awful. My sister has a phobia against vomiting... I remember as a child she would be reduced to a trembling, weeping mess even by minor nauesa. I don't understand the particular phobia...

    Aww, that's awful. My sister has a phobia against vomiting... I remember as a child she would be reduced to a trembling, weeping mess even by minor nauesa. I don't understand the particular phobia - to me, nausea and vomiting is deeply unpleasant but doesn't generate panic - but I can appreciate the sentiment. I've experienced panic attacks for other reasons.

    I guess my question to you is, what is the reason why you don't seek help? You say you wish your friend had booked you an appointment, and recognize you need help, but you don't want to do it yourself. What is preventing you from seeking help?

    6 votes
  15. Comment on Magdalena Andersson voted in as Sweden's first female prime minister – parliamentary vote putting her in the top job was very tight in ~news

    imperialismus
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    In this case, it means resigning cabinet positions held by the party and formally withdrawing support in parliament.

    In this case, it means resigning cabinet positions held by the party and formally withdrawing support in parliament.

    2 votes
  16. Comment on Ocarina of Time's source code has been reverse engineered in ~games

    imperialismus
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    They didn’t rebuild the code from scratch. They decompiled the original binary and then set about making it more human-readable while still matching the original in function. No human would write...

    What’s so impressive about these efforts is that nothing was stolen or leaked or pirated. These fans have simply rebuilt the entire game’s code—albeit “using modern coding languages”—from scratch, to the point where it functionally performs identically to the original.

    They didn’t rebuild the code from scratch. They decompiled the original binary and then set about making it more human-readable while still matching the original in function. No human would write a function signature like this:

    f32 func_8006C510(f32 arg0, f32 arg1, f32 arg2, f32 arg3, f32 arg4, f32 arg5)

    This is completely meaningless to a human and obviously machine-decompiled from the original binary.

    This doesn’t mean the project is necessarily in breach of copyright law, but it differs from the practice called clean room reimplementation, where you simply observe the behavior of a piece of software and write new software that replicates that behavior, without any reference to the original machine or source code. That’s what I’d call rebuilding the game from scratch.

    6 votes
  17. Comment on My current Oscar predictions in ~movies

    imperialismus
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    Really? When's the last time a straight up comedy won Best Picture? I guess Parasite has some comedic elements, but I wouldn't say it's primarily a comedy, and it's a huge outlier anyway. Most...

    (I also think it’s currently the front-runner to win Best Picture)

    Really? When's the last time a straight up comedy won Best Picture? I guess Parasite has some comedic elements, but I wouldn't say it's primarily a comedy, and it's a huge outlier anyway. Most Best Picture winners, or even nominees, are serious dramas. Often self-consciously so.

    1 vote
  18. Comment on A group of crypto enthusiasts named Krause House DAO are raising money to buy an NBA team in ~finance

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    Fan-owned clubs are a thing. The majority of the clubs in the German Bundesliga are majority fan-owned due to the 50+1 rule (member associations must retain a voting majority - this rule has some...

    Fan-owned clubs are a thing. The majority of the clubs in the German Bundesliga are majority fan-owned due to the 50+1 rule (member associations must retain a voting majority - this rule has some exceptions but applies to the majority of clubs at present). Things can get chaotic but ultimately the system has been in place since 1998 (before that, clubs did not have private ownership at all) and neither the teams nor the league has collapsed. It works.

    The novel idea here is that membership is tied to an NFT and general assemblies are conducted via digital voting. I assume there needs to be done some legal legwork to tie the crypto stuff together with traditional corporate law. But I don't see how the idea is fundamentally different from a corporation that is controlled by a membership club, like Bayern Munich.

    The idea that cooperatives or membership clubs can't work when they already exist, have existed for more than a hundred years, and in many cases are highly successful, is a little ridiculous. A crypto-coop is just an old idea packaged in buzzwords for a new generation.

    3 votes
  19. Comment on World Chess Championship 2021 - Megathread in ~games.tabletop

    imperialismus
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    Rd7 wasn't a blunder! The position was completely drawn before that move and still drawn after it. Magnus didn't miss the potential repetition, he deliberately left an opening for it. It's like a...

    Magnus kinda blundered the game away, on a move that surprised David Howell: 40...Rd7. By doing that, he opened himself to a fork that would lose him one of his rooks. The only way to escape the fork would necessarily lead to a draw by repetition. They agreed to draw right away instead. It felt like a fair result, but who knows what would have happened if Magnus didn't blunder move 40.

    Rd7 wasn't a blunder! The position was completely drawn before that move and still drawn after it. Magnus didn't miss the potential repetition, he deliberately left an opening for it. It's like a tacit draw offer. Sometimes players who are pushing for a win in an endgame accidentally give their opponent an opportunity to force a draw right away, but this wasn't one of those times.

    Is this the first chess tournament you're watching live? If so, welcome to the wonderful world of competitive chess!

    4 votes
  20. Comment on This webcomic made it okay to be sad online. Then its artist vanished. in ~arts

    imperialismus
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    Oh man, this sounded so familiar! I went to my bookshelf and sure enough, there was my copy of Sad Pictures for Children. I don't remember the drama, but I did receive my copy of the book. I...

    Oh man, this sounded so familiar! I went to my bookshelf and sure enough, there was my copy of Sad Pictures for Children. I don't remember the drama, but I did receive my copy of the book. I posted a couple of pictures om imgur where you can see the cover and the last page with the dead wasp. I couldn't find any high-quality pictures online of this book, so I assume it's pretty rare.

    I checked my email and apparently I paid $40 for this in 2012 (don't recall when I received it). Safe to say a substantial portion of that is shipping. It's not unusual when I buy books from abroad that half the cost is shipping, which is one reason I've almost entirely moved over to ebooks. But I'm really glad I have a physical copy of this book. It's a really high-quality production. It's a thick and heavy (but small) book that includes a blackened dead wasp and some of the pages have figures on them that are glued on top of the page rather than printed on it, which has to have increased production cost.

    Apparently I paid for a signed copy with a little doodle in it, and I can't even tell if there is one. The first page inside the cover is entirely black, but there is a small doodle in almost imperceptible gray of two figures, one telling the other, "you're gonna die". The gray sharpie extends off the page slightly onto the inside of the book cover itself, so it might be hand drawn.

    The page that normally has copyright information reads: "handmade in china by adorable and exhausted children / all rights reserved / for those with social power within their cultural context."

    In short, this is a really cool book.

    8 votes