12 votes

How much time do you spend online and how do you spend it?

Personally, the vast majority of the time I'm not in school/studying, asleep or doing daily necessities or the phone is out of batteries, which for a 14-yo without too much of a social life is usually upwards of 10 hours a day. This has been true for me for as long as I can rememeber really, I have pictures of 5-year old me playing flash games.

My time is usually divided as:

55% or so goes to this site, mainly because I like the discussion, it's more serious than reddit and we take our content more seriously. I would spend more if this site had more discussion, unfortunately. I have nothing to do in this site other than find something to comment in or post more often than I'd like.

25% or so goes to reddit, mainly for memes, places like imaginary maps, political discussion (although I gotta say, they're all fkin moderates) , true ask reddit and the ocasional stroll through the front page.

The remaining 20% is, roughly in order either YouTube or NSFW (depends on the day) and news.

9 comments

  1. [3]
    Atvelonis
    (edited )
    Link
    Uncomfortably much. If you'd asked this six months ago, the answer would be "comfortably little." Pre-quarantine, I probably devoted 40–50% of my online time to a wiki that I run. I almost never...

    Uncomfortably much. If you'd asked this six months ago, the answer would be "comfortably little." Pre-quarantine, I probably devoted 40–50% of my online time to a wiki that I run. I almost never watch television and generally only watch movies on weekends, so the remaining hours were mostly scattered between Tildes, Reddit, and a few miscellaneous forums. But the online world was not where I focused my attention. I could spend 2–3 hours exercising, 6–8 doing some sort of work, perhaps 1–2 socializing, and 2–3 relaxing somehow, plus more irregular commitments like social dances or organizing hikes or whatever. There was surprisingly little wasted time in there. My commute was short, and I made an effort to check social media and such only in situations where it was impossible for me to be productive or relax (like standing on line).

    The coronavirus has completely destroyed that schedule. I still read and exercise, albeit irregularly, but there are no dances anymore and I hardly see any friends. I've been sleeping poorly and can never predict whether I'll be lying in bed for eight hours or twelve. Working from home means that I have very little structure, so I will occasionally find myself doing literally nothing on my phone for upwards of 3–4 hours over the course of a day. My work is all online now. I've been spending a little more time on my wiki, which is nice, but far too much on Tildes and Reddit, becoming vaguely interested in some article or other. Usually it loops back to the virus. I spend an inordinate amount of time looking at the same few Wikipedia pages: COVID-19 pandemic in New York (state), COVID-19 pandemic in Pennsylvania, COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, and COVID-19 vaccine.

    In terms of social media specifically, I recently deleted the Reddit app from my phone. It feels good. I like to check Instagram to keep up with my friends (I have a healthy relationship with what I see there), and skim a few Discord servers that I manage. I love Snapchat, although I only use it to talk to a few people. There was an time in my life when I easily spent 16+ hours per day online. I was drawn too deeply into the web, and it was bad for my mental health. For the time being I'm okay with using Tildes more instead of Reddit simply because the quality of discussion is much higher, although long-term I need to cut down on all of this. I've stopped carrying my phone with me throughout the day and will only check it in the morning and in the evening, or if I need to log into a 2FA account. This also feels good.

    5 votes
    1. [2]
      Kuromantis
      Link Parent
      Neat. That's quite a few activities you had, definitely helps to put a lot of the people who want this pandemic to end so they can resume their activities, because since I don't engage in any...

      Neat. That's quite a few activities you had, definitely helps to put a lot of the people who want this pandemic to end so they can resume their activities, because since I don't engage in any outdoor or social activities, the only effects that the 'crown virus' has had on me was that I need to wear a mask when my parents ask me to go to get groceries and that my class hours are now 2-4:10 PM instead of 7-12:17 AM, and offloading the rest of the student workload for teachers to send me.

      When all non-essential services shut down, nothing happened to me because I didn't use any of them, I don't go outside unless I have a dentist appointment.

      Just a question though:

      I've stopped carrying my phone with me throughout the day and will only check it in the morning and in the evening, or if I need to log into a 2FA account.

      Why would you need to use it for 2FA accounts?

      1. Atvelonis
        (edited )
        Link Parent
        Lacking sufficiently interesting projects to work on or events to attend, I spiral into deep stretches of ennui and self-loathing. I can relax just fine, and I value solitude, but only as a rest...

        Lacking sufficiently interesting projects to work on or events to attend, I spiral into deep stretches of ennui and self-loathing. I can relax just fine, and I value solitude, but only as a rest period between more active things. Extended periods of isolation wreak havoc on my mind. I can't express how much I detest the virus.

        I would've been much less affected by this pandemic at age 14 than I am now. I wasn't an antisocial child, but I was happy to sit in front of a screen for the whole day instead of doing real-life activities. I became increasingly social through high school and into college, when I had the shocking realization that I wasn't an introvert, as I had assumed for my entire life. I recharge with social interactions. Now, I'm finding myself playing video games again, something I haven't regularly done for a long time. If I lived closer to a wilderness area, I'd go out with my tent every weekend just for some variety, but that's not really possible at the moment. I'm left with the internet!

        When I check my bank account balance online or log into my work email, I need to enter a code that it sends to my phone as an added layer of security. There's probably some hack I could use to get around it, but that would be more trouble than it's worth.

        2 votes
  2. rogue_cricket
    (edited )
    Link
    My entire job is online, so that's 8-9 hours by default every weekday using the internet to chat with coworkers and to do work. Generally my "social online time" takes place kind of on and off...

    My entire job is online, so that's 8-9 hours by default every weekday using the internet to chat with coworkers and to do work. Generally my "social online time" takes place kind of on and off throughout my workday where I'll shoot off the occasional discord message or post to break up the day (like now! I'm waiting on code deployment!).

    I do a lot of non-entertainment stuff via the internet, like shopping, counselling, occasional mentoring/tutoring, planning meals, and just general organizing. For entertainment I use it to watch things I'm interested in, like Netflix or the occasional YouTube video, and I consume maybe about an hour of podcasts a day while out walking or exercising which I guess sort of counts? Sometimes I'll check a blog or read an article from either here or from MetaFilter too.

    I do some PC gaming as a hobby, although I tend to dislike online games and I only really play with a couple IRL friends or my brothers, so I'm kind of offline throughout that experience.

    I used to be Really Online as a teen and in my early 20s, and looking back I have mixed feelings about it. I've tried to cultivate a lot of other non-computer hobbies - I got back into piano, I have a dog that can not possibly ever be walked enough (we've tried), and I have flower and vegetable gardens. I think it's been better for me overall.

    4 votes
  3. perfect
    Link
    Since March I've spent an average of 6 hours a day on my computer, most of that is school or video games. Maybe an hour on my phone. And maybe another hour watching Netflix. Before the virus I...

    Since March I've spent an average of 6 hours a day on my computer, most of that is school or video games. Maybe an hour on my phone. And maybe another hour watching Netflix.

    Before the virus I worked crazy hours (by choice), and I was probably on my computer for 1-2 hours a day, mostly for video games. I was so productive on days off, and I was flying through my apprenticeship hours. It's weird to think that I miss working 70 hour weeks.

    3 votes
  4. tempestoftruth
    Link
    I'm currently doing remote work for a community advocacy organization I'm interning with. My main project is coordinating a social media campaign, so I spend the vast majority of my days on the...

    I'm currently doing remote work for a community advocacy organization I'm interning with. My main project is coordinating a social media campaign, so I spend the vast majority of my days on the computer or on the phone, and I mean all day, typically 16-18 hours a day.

    Briefly, an aside: I'm a staunch online privacy advocate and deleted all my social media years ago. You can imagine how frustrating it was to be asked to create content for Facebook.

    Online responsibilities have me shackled to the computer all day. Since it's easy to avoid scrutiny working from home, I spend a lot of time "at work" on a combination of Reddit, Tildes, and my RSS feed. I spend a small amount of time off work (somewhere around 25 percent, I'd say) playing video games, updating my personal website with content, and learning programming basics. I find the latter three activities far more fulfilling than pulling the lever of endless Internet content, but addictions are hard to break, especially when you need to be online and available at every moment of the day, to jump on an organizing call, reach out to people, post new content for your page, etc.

    I want to note, Tildes and my RSS feed aren't anywhere near as bad as Reddit when it comes to meaningless content that exists to generate clicks and ad revenue, or banal, repetitive discussion on what passes for politics nowadays, but I've taken to refreshing them far too often, which is unhealthy in its own right. I envision a version of myself with healthier habits continuing to use Tildes and RSS feeds, just not with the same frequency.

    The only thing I do off the computer screen is read, quite frankly, and I can barely do that without reaching for my phone after thirty seconds of no immediate stimulus.

    It's brutal for my mental health, my physical health, my attention span, my relationship with myself, my family, and others, my self-image, the list goes on. I want out of this hell, and thankfully in two weeks' time I'll have that wish realized. It's probably time to start planning about how best to break these habits I've worked so hard to beat, and how to adapt to online learning in the fall when the pressures of being online all the time will return in full force.

    3 votes
  5. teaearlgraycold
    Link
    Too much time - probably like 10 hours per day. But when you're a software developer working remotely under quarantine it's hard to do much better. I do at least get to biking most days. During...

    Too much time - probably like 10 hours per day. But when you're a software developer working remotely under quarantine it's hard to do much better. I do at least get to biking most days. During the week at least 30 minutes in a day, ideally 60-90. On the weekend I try to go on a 4-7 hour bike trip on Saturday then take off from biking for Sunday. I often do some cooking or baking, so that keep things more varied.

    But since late March I've been in and out of short-term rentals, which makes things way more tolerable. I'll get a couple of friends together and stay out in a cabin for 1-2 months. Usually there's a hot tub and plenty of outdoor space for smoking meat, biking, etc. During those periods it's probably more like 5-6 hours per day which is great. But currently I'm back in my apartment alone with not much else to do besides spend time online.

    3 votes
  6. knocklessmonster
    Link
    I'm typically awake for 16 hours. I'll probably spend 14 of those, currently, online in some capacity, unless I've managed to sink into a game. I'm not working right now because of the pandemic,...

    I'm typically awake for 16 hours. I'll probably spend 14 of those, currently, online in some capacity, unless I've managed to sink into a game. I'm not working right now because of the pandemic, so... yeah.

    During school, honestly, it doesn't change a lot. Because I'll be home this semester, I'll be able to get out of class, do work immediately, and probably be online again, but I'll have my "days off" where I'm at home doing homework 5-10 hours a day, with 8 more spent online.

    It's not typically in an addictive capacity or anything, but how I kill time.

    2 votes
  7. Tygrak
    Link
    I would say that most of the days over the summer break I spend basically the whole day online at the computer, wasting my time in some way, mostly Youtube, videogames and Reddit/Tildes....

    I would say that most of the days over the summer break I spend basically the whole day online at the computer, wasting my time in some way, mostly Youtube, videogames and Reddit/Tildes. Definitely healthy. Sometimes I have some programming project going so I am at least doing something kind of productive.

    Thinking about what do I even do besides sitting at the computer (and by extension online) is kind of uncomfortable. I play my guitar, but that's just a bit each day, and also often with the help of the computer again, to look up tabs and stuff to play along to. Sometimes I go to the pub or to the tea house with friends, which was ruined thanks to corona for a long time, but now the restrictions are mostly gone in my country, still that's just maybe once every two weeks. Also sometimes I go on kind of lengthy walks, yesterday I walked like 16 km. But it's also kind of hot these days to really be doing that. As I said, I am definitely leading a healthy lifestyle. When I had a job, it wasn't too different, just with 2 hours of commuting each day added, and a part of the day spent sitting at a different computer in a different place.

    That's over the summer break, but during the semester it also isn't too different. Which reminds me of all the stuff I will have to do next semester. Brrr.

    1 vote