FluffyKittens's recent activity

  1. Comment on Cheap, easy, and not-too-unhealthy homemade snacks? in ~food

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    Former healthcare researcher; these are informed hot takes meant to give you jumping off points. Higher levels of fat/salt/sugars added for flavor. Digestion/energy release time: This is by far...
    • Exemplary

    Former healthcare researcher; these are informed hot takes meant to give you jumping off points.

    • Higher levels of fat/salt/sugars added for flavor.
    • Digestion/energy release time: This is by far the big one people don't think about enough. As you say, a lot of food processing involves reducing things down to a pulp. Compare how fast you'd expect applesauce to get dissolved into a vat of acid vs. large chunks of a whole apple. Processed foods have a much worse nutrient partitioning profile, because they overload the amount of food your body can feed into its buffers (glycogen) vs. storing long-term as fat.
    • Saccharide length: This is really just a continuation of the above - carbohydrates generally come as long chains. The length of the chain controls how fast your body can process the carbohydrate. Sugars, which are a subset of carbohydrates, are basically 1- or 2-length pieces of these chains. Both cooking and mechanical processing (grinding/blending) impact how much these chains get chemically broken down. Processed food prefers base ingredients that tend to come with shorter chains, and use processing methods that break the chains down more than regular home cooking.
    • Hydrogenation of oils: I haven't kept up with the health research on this in the past decade, so I won't go too in depth. Think of it as a messier version of saccharide issue, but with lipids.
    • Removal of coarser components: Much of raw plant matter, like dietary fiber, isn't very easily processed by us humans, but is extremely beneficial to the gut bacteria that help us process our food and make micronutrients bioavailable to us. These coarser/less digestible elements also play an important mechanical role in "scraping out" the bowels, so to speak (etiology of diverticulitis and the like).
    • Ingredient selection: Processed food manufacturers generally treat ingredients as commodities, leading to growing practices that encourage bigger produce yields at the expense of micronutrient profile and flavor. Use of HFCS as a primary sweetener in the West is also a particular problem due to its role in NAFLD.

    Vast majority of food additives/preservatives/colorings are perfectly safe - though there are absolutely exceptions (e.g. celery powder used for "uncured" bacon). Oxidation is... a really high-context thing to talk about - but you're right on the money about the comparison with home-cooking; I wouldn't expect processed food to be relatively worse in that domain.

    14 votes
  2. Comment on Turnstile: Privacy-preserving alternative to CAPTCHA by Cloudflare in ~tech

    FluffyKittens
    Link
    While I truly respect the intent, and think cloudflare’s doing a good thing here… inb4 problematic bugs, and major problems for the long tail end of users on non-standard browsers.

    While I truly respect the intent, and think cloudflare’s doing a good thing here… inb4 problematic bugs, and major problems for the long tail end of users on non-standard browsers.

    2 votes
  3. Comment on Revealed: US Military bought mass monitoring tool that includes internet browsing, email data in ~tech

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    Fully agreed. A lot of the data collection seems like marketing fluff + the same old tricks that have been in use a long time. The netflow stuff is pretty scary though, at least in theory, as it...

    Fully agreed. A lot of the data collection seems like marketing fluff + the same old tricks that have been in use a long time.

    The netflow stuff is pretty scary though, at least in theory, as it isn’t easily defeated by VPN or third-party DNS. If I’m understanding correctly, the premise is that if the FBI or other agency finds the physical servers of a DNM or torrent site (e.g. WhatCD) and want to honeypot it without touching the server itself, they can hook into the networking infra in front of the server, and then cross reference the number/size/timing of packets coming to/from the server against the ISP netflow data to identify operators and users of the site. This defeats standard privacy tools pretty easily - only way to definitively counter this sort of traffic analysis attack is to mask your encrypted traffic by mixing in a lot of empty noise.

    3 votes
  4. Comment on AdminLTE vs Pure Bootstrap for a new web project? in ~comp

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    Might be the case that I just suck at front end, but I find it several orders of magnitude easier to have an arsenal of known-good utility classes to mix and match, then marginally tweak where...

    Might be the case that I just suck at front end, but I find it several orders of magnitude easier to have an arsenal of known-good utility classes to mix and match, then marginally tweak where necessary, compared to manually building it all from scratch or homegrown classes every time (not that Tailwind strictly necessitates doing that).

    In short, the value I get is in the building-block abstractions, not so much the default styling.

    3 votes
  5. Comment on AdminLTE vs Pure Bootstrap for a new web project? in ~comp

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    Hard disagree, for the specific reason that Bootstrap has a lot of high-quality and affordable themes that make it look good out of the box, and it’s explicitly meant to be easy to customize...

    Hard disagree, for the specific reason that Bootstrap has a lot of high-quality and affordable themes that make it look good out of the box, and it’s explicitly meant to be easy to customize stylistically. It would take dozens of hours to vet custom components made in Tailwind across all combos of browser and device to look for deviations, whereas Bootstrap papers over a lot of common rough edges and saves a lot of energy poring over CanIUse.

    Why reinvent the wheel, frame, driveshaft, and more when you’ve already got a hackable kit car right at hand?

    5 votes
  6. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    I’ve been rewatching Mr. Robot for the first time since it aired with my SO, and just about every episode I keep getting wrapped up in the cinematography. Tons of well-framed bits of symbolism and...

    I’ve been rewatching Mr. Robot for the first time since it aired with my SO, and just about every episode I keep getting wrapped up in the cinematography. Tons of well-framed bits of symbolism and foreshadowing in the early seasons that only become evident once you know the ending.

    The Kubrick influence is really heavy, presuming that’s what you’re into.

    6 votes
  7. Comment on Matt Berry - What's in my record store shopping bag? in ~music

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    Nice find - thanks for the link! Digging his picks.

    Nice find - thanks for the link! Digging his picks.

    1 vote
  8. Comment on An AI-generated artwork won first place at a state fair fine arts competition, and artists are pissed in ~arts

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    Fair enough, I guess it depends on how you view the utility of art. Rhetorical example: is an original Basquiat more artistically valuable than a kindergartener’s doodles if you can’t tell the...

    Fair enough, I guess it depends on how you view the utility of art.

    Rhetorical example: is an original Basquiat more artistically valuable than a kindergartener’s doodles if you can’t tell the difference? Depends on if you deem narrative history and emotional intent to be an inherent part of the artwork itself or not.

    5 votes
  9. Comment on An AI-generated artwork won first place at a state fair fine arts competition, and artists are pissed in ~arts

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    Counterpoint: the art should hold up on its own merit. Would you be this emotional about someone using a food processor in a pesto competition instead of hand-grinding with mortar and pestle, or...

    Counterpoint: the art should hold up on its own merit.

    Would you be this emotional about someone using a food processor in a pesto competition instead of hand-grinding with mortar and pestle, or using a blowtorch + sous vide on steak instead of grilling? The goal is good food, not how you make the food.

    Neither of those technologies undid the artisanal cooking industry. They make it easier for a rank amateur to compete with a pro chef, but pro chefs have simply added those tools to their kits as well, and yet no one’s mistaking gourmet food made by a pro with gourmet food made by a rando off the street.

    6 votes
  10. Comment on What's an underrated, cancelled, or largely forgotten show that you really love? in ~tv

    FluffyKittens
    Link
    I'll plug Toast of London (now Toast of Tinseltown) as an underrated show from recent years. It's an alt-comedy starring Matt Berry, who played Douglas Reynholm in The IT Crowd. It's exceptionally...

    I'll plug Toast of London (now Toast of Tinseltown) as an underrated show from recent years. It's an alt-comedy starring Matt Berry, who played Douglas Reynholm in The IT Crowd. It's exceptionally dry humor, but a solid ten in terms of just how damn memetic it is - tons of recurring gags that sink deep into the brain.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bYY8m1Lb2I

    In a totally different vein, I'm also a massive junkie for Time Team - a British reality TV/documentary mashup archaeology series that's been going for near thirty years and has the vast majority of the back catalog on Youtube.

    https://www.youtube.com/c/TimeTeamClassics

    3 votes
  11. Comment on Awesome Isochrones in ~comp

    FluffyKittens
    Link
    Are you the author, OP? I’ve been enjoying these articles for a while and hadn’t spotted the username. They’re very well-written; keep it up!

    Are you the author, OP? I’ve been enjoying these articles for a while and hadn’t spotted the username.

    They’re very well-written; keep it up!

    1 vote
  12. Comment on Fortnightly Programming Q&A Thread in ~comp

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    Yeah, I like Backblaze too - but correct me if I'm wrong: I don't think they offer too much in the way of checksumming/error correction? A lot of my large files are database dumps, meaning that a...

    Yeah, I like Backblaze too - but correct me if I'm wrong: I don't think they offer too much in the way of checksumming/error correction?

    A lot of my large files are database dumps, meaning that a single bit flip in the wrong place can render a backup useless. ZFS is a big selling point for me.

    1 vote
  13. Comment on Fortnightly Programming Q&A Thread in ~comp

    FluffyKittens
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Tarsnap is in my "aware of but haven't tried" bucket. I've shied away from it because of the user-managed-keys thing - I actually find comfort in the fact that with rsync there's a human who can...

    Tarsnap is in my "aware of but haven't tried" bucket. I've shied away from it because of the user-managed-keys thing - I actually find comfort in the fact that with rsync there's a human who can help if something crazy happens and all backups of my* private key go up in flames at the same time. Yet if I wanted to store sensitive data requiring encryption, I'd still be able to do that 100% securely by piping data through any old command-line encryption utility, and similarly, I can just pipe data through tar + gz to get fast and efficient compression.

    And unless I'm reading something wrong, it's $0.016/GB/month vs. $0.25/GB/month lol.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on Fortnightly Programming Q&A Thread in ~comp

    FluffyKittens
    Link
    Posting an answer to a question no one asked, but one I wish I had already known a few weeks ago: what’s the best developer tool for mission-critical, production-grade data archival and backup?...

    Posting an answer to a question no one asked, but one I wish I had already known a few weeks ago: what’s the best developer tool for mission-critical, production-grade data archival and backup?

    May seem like a high-context or subjective question… but for damn near every practical case I can think of, it’s rsync.net. They give you a massive ZFS storage pool (from 680 GB up to exabyte) that can be accessed using standard CLI tools (e.g. …rsync), and take scheduled snapshots of the data in case of ransomware or accidental deletion. No worrying about physical disk layout, bitrot/checksumming, encryption tools, compatibility, etc.

    I’d known of it by reputation in the past, but after actually getting my hands dirty, it’s the best devtool service I’ve ever tried by a mile, and I never want to live without it again.

    TLDR - Rsync.net, apply directly to the forehead.

    3 votes
  15. Comment on GitLab plans to delete dormant projects in free accounts in ~comp

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    Might change your calculus if you were already pulling in $200M/yr. 😉

    Might change your calculus if you were already pulling in $200M/yr. 😉

  16. Comment on GitLab plans to delete dormant projects in free accounts in ~comp

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    Source code is super light, generally speaking - not surprised the savings would only be around that much. To give an order of magnitude comparison, rsync.net quotes $720k/yr for a petabyte of...

    It's not sustainable over the long term to host people's data forever, for free unless there's somewhere you're getting that much value from.

    Source code is super light, generally speaking - not surprised the savings would only be around that much. To give an order of magnitude comparison, rsync.net quotes $720k/yr for a petabyte of storage.

    It'd be pretty unobjectionable if they wanted to impose restrictions on free accounts going forward, but threatening to pull the rug on existing FOSS projects instantly burns a lot of goodwill. Even though they've reversed the decision, a lot of devs, myself included, are going to think twice about using Gitlab in the future: it looks like they've either got the MBAs calling the shots and running rampant, or they're in dire financial straits. Neither bodes well for platform stability.

    9 votes
  17. Comment on GitLab plans to delete dormant projects in free accounts in ~comp

    FluffyKittens
    Link
    What an unbelievably massive self-own... Imagine trading away your reputation for just one million in annual revenue.

    What an unbelievably massive self-own... Imagine trading away your reputation for just one million in annual revenue.

    11 votes
  18. Comment on AI and ethical licensing in ~tech

    FluffyKittens
    Link Parent
    Won’t comment too much on the merits of the licensing angle (I’ll leave that to someone in the legal profession), other than to say it’s a noble intent, but probably not the cure for what ails us....

    Won’t comment too much on the merits of the licensing angle (I’ll leave that to someone in the legal profession), other than to say it’s a noble intent, but probably not the cure for what ails us.

    Using blackbox AI as anything other than a flakey guessing device is a recipe for disaster. Examples of misapplication include Tesla FSD, Amazon’s worker surveillance tools, and automated proctoring services. Examples of good applications for blackbox AI would be industrial applications like visually scanning for defective units on a factory conveyor belt, or research work like scanning satellite imagery/LIDAR measurements to identify probable archaeological sites. In other words, it should only be used in contexts where the impact of false positives is minimal.

    Regarding the ML industry more broadly, we have plenty of “dumber” statistical tools that not only are more explainable than blackbox AI, but are also generally more robust and effective. There’s plenty of greenfield work to be done that doesn’t necessitate the societal harm imposed by the current blackbox boom, and I’m optimistic the industry will move back towards the simple but effective tools long-term.

    For practical examples of what I mean by “dumber” tools, Wikipedia’s Anomaly Detection article has a good list that spans the spectrum of technique complexity pretty well: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anomaly_detection#Popular_techniques

    (Obligatory disclaimer that I’m probably about to take a job with a “dumb AI” healthtech company - but that’s because I’m practicing what I preach on this front.)

    3 votes
  19. Comment on Five UX improvements that could save lives in ~tech

  20. Comment on What have you been watching / reading this week? (Anime/Manga) in ~anime

    FluffyKittens
    Link
    Finished Saiki K last week, and I’m beside myself craving more. Definitely in my top three all-time series so far. This week, I’m just barely into the third season of Hunter x Hunter, and it’s...

    Finished Saiki K last week, and I’m beside myself craving more. Definitely in my top three all-time series so far.

    This week, I’m just barely into the third season of Hunter x Hunter, and it’s definitely good but not great. Excellent world building and characters, run-of-the-mill plotline.

    Following that, anyone have recs for series that have relatively grounded hand-to-hand combat instead of characters shooting balls of lightning and woo-woo magic at each other? The main rec I’m seeing from some cursory googling is Kenichi, which I’ll check out, but seems a bit tropey for my taste. Best examples I can think of for what I’m after would be the scenes in AoT that have throws/ankle picks/armbars, or a version of Cowboy Bebop with some realistic grappling thrown in the mix. I’m basically just thirsting for a bit more verisimilitude than the norm.

    1 vote