nacho's recent activity

  1. Comment on Prime Minister Scott Morrison has defied years of opinion polls and public expectation to lead the Coalition to a shock election victory. in ~news

    nacho Link
    Wow. I didn't expect this outcome, that's for sure. This was Labour's election to lose, and somehow they did. Anyone have good theories on what happened before everyone and their uncle's finished...

    Wow.

    I didn't expect this outcome, that's for sure. This was Labour's election to lose, and somehow they did.

    Anyone have good theories on what happened before everyone and their uncle's finished their post-mortems of the campaign?

  2. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

    nacho Link
    I had a friend that's been pressuring me to watch Grey's anatomy for years essentially saying it's the best doctor show since, well ever. They ended up giving me season 1, so now I'm going to have...

    I had a friend that's been pressuring me to watch Grey's anatomy for years essentially saying it's the best doctor show since, well ever. They ended up giving me season 1, so now I'm going to have to watch it.

    If it's good, both the good and the bad thing is that there's like 15 seasons and it just got renewed for another two.


    I've been having fun with The Good Fight's season 3. The finale is coming this week, and i'm curious to see where the plot's going considering it was renewed for a fourth season in April. There's several options, and that's always enticing.

    It's been a long time since I've laughed as hard watching tv as I have during this season of the show. And that's while it's all pretty dark/dramatic as well. Definitely worth checking out if law shows with plenty of plot development rather than just one case per episode is something you enjoy.

    3 votes
  3. Comment on TV Tuesdays Free Talk in ~tv

    nacho Link Parent
    The Leftovers was amazing. You're in for a treat. I have to say, I haven't been interested in Chernobyl. Is it really that different from all the other documentaries made on the topics over the...

    The Leftovers was amazing. You're in for a treat.

    I have to say, I haven't been interested in Chernobyl. Is it really that different from all the other documentaries made on the topics over the years? It's gotten a huge amount of attention.

    2 votes
  4. Comment on Adobe Warns Customers of Potential Legal Action for Using Older Versions of Creative Cloud Apps in ~tech

    nacho Link Parent
    I wonder if there are ideological reasons for doing things that way, or they think/calculate that it's more profitable in the long run. For a lot of subscription services, the prices actually go...

    I wonder if there are ideological reasons for doing things that way, or they think/calculate that it's more profitable in the long run.

    For a lot of subscription services, the prices actually go up after you've demonstrated loyalty for x amount of time after an introductory cheaper period to get you hooked.

    I get the opposing pressure here since after a year you own the software. Why continue subscribing when you've got that previous version? Either the newer versions have to get better pretty fast, ,or there's no reason to continue paying.

    3 votes
  5. Comment on A Simple Way to Reduce Harassment in Online Discussion Groups in ~tech

    nacho Link Parent
    It works well other places too, so long as the mods have automoderator set up to automatically remove every response to the rules comment. Otherwise it becomes just a meta-nonsense placeholder at...

    It works well other places too, so long as the mods have automoderator set up to automatically remove every response to the rules comment.

    Otherwise it becomes just a meta-nonsense placeholder at the top of every single thread for those who're angry and invested in meta-issues of that subreddit to bellyache.

    3 votes
  6. Comment on Measured air samples put Canadian oil sand emissions at higher levels than industry-calculated values made using the internationally recommended methods for estimating the emissions in ~enviro

    nacho Link Parent
    If we're talking about oil sand production, I'd agree the EU-regulated area doesn't produce appreciable amounts of oil. If we're talking all oil production though, Norway (not EU, but EEA and so...

    If we're talking about oil sand production, I'd agree the EU-regulated area doesn't produce appreciable amounts of oil.

    If we're talking all oil production though, Norway (not EU, but EEA and so EU-regulated) and the UK alone produce something like 2.5 million barrels a day. I think Canada is something like 3.5 million barrels a day?


    I remember reading this paper from last year on the actual emissions of global oil production. Their research covers something like 98 percent of the world's production per 2015.

    Here's a pdf

    Conclusion: Algeria (1), Venezuela, Cameroon, Canada and Iran are the five dirtiest oil-producing countries in the world, respectively. (figure 1)

    In a world where we can't extract all oil, because there's a global surplus, and if we extract it all global climate goes to hell, we should stop producing the most polluting oil to extract.

    In 2015, that would mean cutting out the dirtiest oil production. Canadian oil fields are some of the very first that shouldn't be extracted due to emissions (figure 2).

    Have things really changed that much since 2015? If so, awesome!

    2 votes
  7. Comment on Measured air samples put Canadian oil sand emissions at higher levels than industry-calculated values made using the internationally recommended methods for estimating the emissions in ~enviro

    nacho Link
    Here's a pop science take. Their title: CO2-sniffing plane finds oil sands emissions higher than industry reported: Environment Canada researchers air samples tell a different story than industry...

    Here's a pop science take. Their title:

    • CO2-sniffing plane finds oil sands emissions higher than industry reported: Environment Canada researchers air samples tell a different story than industry calculations

    Essentially, oil sand production is even dirtier than previously thought it seems.

    Could that change regulations or licensing schemes for this type of production?

    1 vote
  8. Comment on 'Hell no': Caster Semenya will not take testosterone medication in ~sports

    nacho Link Parent
    I know this is an aside in an otherwise complicated issue, but the VO2-max issue is generally resolved the other way around: Those with asthma or other lowered VO2-max levels are essentially...

    I know this is an aside in an otherwise complicated issue, but the VO2-max issue is generally resolved the other way around:

    • Those with asthma or other lowered VO2-max levels are essentially allowed to medicate in ways that closely correspond to performance enhancing drugs, because inhalers, even powerful ones only found in hospitals supposedly don't get you an advantage beyond what'd otherwise be possible.

    Sure, exercise can lead to asthma, especially in cold environments, but it's pretty silly that you're more likely to do well in the Winter Olympics if you have asthma than if you don't.

    In swimming and all sorts of other endurance competitions, huge percentages of the top competitors have asthma. It felt like cheating the first time I was at an international swimming competition and saw all the inhaler use right before competition (within the doping limits) that lead the competitors to go from normal people to literally shaking due to the strong effects of their medication.


    So do you ban asthma medication, and consequently have a lot of athletes injure themselves away from being able to compete because they get exercised induced asthma during their careers?
    Or do you require everyone else to drug up?

    For testosterone levels things are way more complicated of course, but the general idea: you can be genetically favored for a sport, be that height, arm span, muscular growth, reaction time, hand-eye-coordination, an immune system that can handle huge amounts of exercise without you always getting sick.

    Is Caster Semenya just genetically disadvantaged to the degree that she can't compete in running events, just like I'm just not tall enough to be a high jumper? I don't know. In a situation with no obviously good solutions, is disallowing her from competing the least bad one? I don't know.

    There are exceptions for athletes that can show higher-than-allowed hemoglobin levels that would otherwise be disallowed for blood doping because they can document genetics for being like that all their lives. Is a similar exception for testosterone levels for women in order? I don't know. It very well could be.

    5 votes
  9. Comment on There’s Another Side to the Opioid Crisis in ~health

    nacho Link Parent
    It greatly reduces consumption though. Prohibitions work, not perfectly but that's not the point. Raised prices also work to reduce consumption. Sin taxes have huge health benefits on a societal...

    Guess what, making something illegal doesn't stop people from doing it!

    It greatly reduces consumption though. Prohibitions work, not perfectly but that's not the point.

    Raised prices also work to reduce consumption. Sin taxes have huge health benefits on a societal level. Environmental taxes lead to improved environment.


    I'm concerned about the mental effects to us as individuals from all sorts of substances with strong effects, be that pain killers, alcohol, nicotine, cannabis, broad spectrum antibiotics, antidepressants, even caffeine in high doses, and all sorts of other things.

    I think society has a duty to have strong policies that protect us as individual biological animals from making sound choices because the substances themselves affect our decision-making processes.

    That doesn't mean prohibition, but it does mean sensibly regulating these substances with an aim of reducing unnecessary use by people who's brain and choices change due to the effects of the substances themselves.

    We have to deal with the underlying causes of many things, and medicate symptoms where that's necessary. If I want to go on fender benders every weekend, and that's a real priority I make in my life, great! If it's because I'm dealing with an unsatisfying life or mental issues that should be dealt with in other ways, it isn't.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on How the news took over reality: Is engagement with current affairs key to being a good citizen? Or could an endless torrent of notifications be harming democracy as well as our wellbeing? in ~news

    nacho Link Parent
    That analysis of how media functions is persuasive. I think getting of the ride of the neverending news cycle is a step I'd encourage everyone to take. I still think it's imperative for society,...

    That analysis of how media functions is persuasive.

    I think getting of the ride of the neverending news cycle is a step I'd encourage everyone to take.

    I still think it's imperative for society, for oneself and living a full life to be involved in local civics. That essentially means paying attention to local events in ways that require following news regularly. Not the "someone said x" news, but actual things happening, changes in society, descriptions of how things are run.

    I'm very scared especially about young people who tune out not just the meaningless news cycle, but essentially are disconnected from everything that's happening around them. Sure that ignorance is bliss, but on a societal, but also the individual level, the cost is high. Society matters in all our lives, in large dollar amounts and less fungible ways that might be even more impactful to our lives.

  11. Comment on Game of Thrones cinematographer: it’s not me, it’s your TV settings in ~tv

    nacho Link Parent
    No matter what, the episode was too dark. Looking away from top-of-the-line equipment, effectively requiring people to watch something in a pitch dark cinema-like room is too big an ask. Why...

    No matter what, the episode was too dark. Looking away from top-of-the-line equipment, effectively requiring people to watch something in a pitch dark cinema-like room is too big an ask.

    Why shouldn't I be able to watch GoT on my phone commuting to work, if that's my preference?

    9 votes
  12. Comment on Which subscriptions do you consider to be worth their cost? in ~talk

    nacho Link
    I have ~10 news subscriptions. In money per time spent, that's gotta be some of the most efficient money I spend. Worthwhile news costs money to make. I'd much rather support the best news outlets...

    I have ~10 news subscriptions. In money per time spent, that's gotta be some of the most efficient money I spend.

    Worthwhile news costs money to make. I'd much rather support the best news outlets directly than have them use another financing method ,or worse: stop making the content I consume.

    11 votes
  13. Comment on Julian Assange's Prosecution is about Much More Than Attempting to Hack a Password in ~tech

    nacho Link
    I'm going to present an opinion which is unpopular in tech-related communities: The EFF gets it wrong when they balance journalism/freedom of expression against a country's need for secrets. To...

    I'm going to present an opinion which is unpopular in tech-related communities:

    • The EFF gets it wrong when they balance journalism/freedom of expression against a country's need for secrets.

    To summarize: the EFF doesn't apply reasonable requirements for responsible reporting, and so overstate their proposed journalistic exceptions.

    Just like "national security" can't be or become a catch-all phrase to avoid scrutiny, "journalism" can't become a circular argument for the right to publish things in any format, especially when it's done irresponsibly.


    This specific article on Assange deals with the hacker, but also matters of principle.

    I'd like to again bring attention to three must-read topics regarding Assange to cut through all the spin written about for all sorts of purposes.


    Now that we're up to speed on what Assange's actually done, it appears not only reasonably but obvious that the US must systematically seek to prosecute Assange for his obvious crimes.

    That's when we get into whether or not what Wikileaks has published is journalism, and if so if it's responsible journalism that should have special legal protections from what would otherwise be crimes.

    The EFF is perfectly right in pointing our that journalism is often about publishing information powerful people don't want the public to see. an integral part of that editorial process is choosing what not to publish.

    How would a serious US publication have treated the diplomatic cables Wikileaks published?

    Wikileaks endangered the lives of undercover agents when choosing not to redact their names.
    Wikileaks undermined US diplomatic efforts by embarrassing the US through identifying a lot of sensitive diplomatic information seemingly wholesale (they may have not published certain things for their own ideological reasons).

    What editorial decisions would a reasonable outlet have made given the same cables? A US medium would certainly treat the cables differently to a British one, much less a Chinese or Russian one.

    We rely on the editorial standards of all or news sources every time we consume their content. That's a bitter pill a lot of youth have to swallow. It's easy to say that everything should be open and reported, but that's a simplistic and indefensible view when principle encounters real life.


    Manning and Schwartz were both changed with crimes they'd clearly committed.
    I completely agree with the EFF that it sure looks like the US went on fishing expeditions to find something to charge them with. Why not settle for the slam-dunk, self-evident case as you build cases on the big crimes? That seems only reasonable.

    The EFF is perfectly right in asserting that the current computer- and coders' laws in the US are bad and should be reformed.

    They point out clear issues of how to split reasonable journalism in the US from nonsense and fakery. It's too easy to mislead people in the US without consequence because the First Amendment in 18th century fashion equates more speech with necessarily more free speech.

    Reasonable speech regulation in the US must stem from constitutional change. Barring that, small legal fixes make sense, but the main underlying issue remains.

    If what Wikileaks has published is "journalism", then the EFF is essentially saying that as long as some editor finds something newsworthy, hack all you like and publish anything irrespective of how many lives are endangered. That is not a society we should aspire to but that's the consequence of the EFF's policy on these issues.

    8 votes
  14. Comment on Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election (145MB PDF) in ~news

    nacho Link Parent
    I'm no lawyer, but am under the impression that the Fifth Amendment is more complicated than that in practice. For example, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Salinas v. Texas said than you have to...

    I'm no lawyer, but am under the impression that the Fifth Amendment is more complicated than that in practice.

    For example, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Salinas v. Texas said than you have to actively invoke the Fifth Amendment or silence can be used against you in court.

    By invoking the Fifth Amendment you're actively saying that you could incriminate yourself by saying something.


    If I'm not mistaken, the whole point of subpoenas are to compel testimony in a lot of different situations.

    If everyone just has a right to remain silent, why do subpoenas exist and what do they actually do?

    9 votes
  15. Comment on We are back at square one of personal messaging in ~tech

    nacho Link Parent
    My phone provider lets me send SMS from browser on any platform through a login tied to my phone number (no physical phone required). I completely agree on the point regarding security. I wouldn't...

    My phone provider lets me send SMS from browser on any platform through a login tied to my phone number (no physical phone required).

    I completely agree on the point regarding security. I wouldn't put anything in a message (irrespective of platform) or an email that I'd be uncomfortable putting in writing elsewhere. They are services provided by third parties after all.

    2 votes
  16. Comment on Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election (145MB PDF) in ~news

    nacho Link Parent
    That, and it seems that the reason there was no motive was because Trump never answered questions from a prosecutor during the investigation. I wonder how that strategy of just not saying anything...

    That, and it seems that the reason there was no motive was because Trump never answered questions from a prosecutor during the investigation.

    I wonder how that strategy of just not saying anything would have worked out for "normal" people and not a politician. I don't know enough about the process in detail to know if this is essentially the result one should expect from this type of investigation or not.

    5 votes
  17. Comment on Report On The Investigation Into Russian Interference In The 2016 Presidential Election (145MB PDF) in ~news

    nacho Link Parent
    A quick scroll shows that a lot of the Wikileaks stuff appears to be redacted. Personally, that was my guess for where the potentially most serious wrongdoing would be. News outlets are clamoring...

    A quick scroll shows that a lot of the Wikileaks stuff appears to be redacted.

    Personally, that was my guess for where the potentially most serious wrongdoing would be.


    News outlets are clamoring to analyze and present what's going on. According to my twitter feed, Trump's reactions to the investigation seem to be summarized as "my presidency is over" and "F***" although I haven't read the report for myself yet.

    5 votes
  18. Comment on We are back at square one of personal messaging in ~tech

    nacho Link
    For one-to-one communication, I use SMS almost exclusively. I don't know of anyone who doesn't have unlimited texts and who doesn't respond to text messages. People have their phones everywhere...

    For one-to-one communication, I use SMS almost exclusively. I don't know of anyone who doesn't have unlimited texts and who doesn't respond to text messages. People have their phones everywhere and if they don't respond immediately, they're unavailable.

    SMS works for business contacts, it works for people you don't know, for your loved ones, for everyone.

    People who no longer answer their phones due to robocalls answer per SMS.


    For one-to-many communication, SMS is king. I send mass texts for work regularly.

    SMS is the only way to know you reach everyone you should reach because everyone has a phone. Not everyone has whatever other app/platform you want.

    Sending thousands of text messages at once is free and extremely easy.


    I completely agree with the sea of multi-person platforms being a huge issue.

    Coordination clients that just deal with everything and stores all your log-ins were huge from like 2004 and a handful of years onwards. I don't know why they basically died, but they did.

    I'd expect there's some structural or protocol thing that makes this difficult to do for free or cheaply enough today to make it viable. Otherwise I'm sure it would be as quickly adopted as the old Trillian messenger that took over in all my circles 15 years ago.

    12 votes
  19. Comment on Julian Assange arrested at Ecuadorian embassy in London in ~news

    nacho Link Parent
    Why was it important to publish the names of agents rather than redacting their names from cables, leaving them out to dry in the field, irrespective of their nationality? Why was it important to...

    Why was it important to publish the names of agents rather than redacting their names from cables, leaving them out to dry in the field, irrespective of their nationality?

    Why was it important to doxx pretty much every female turkisk voter and publishing all of their private phone numbers rather than redacting them?


    This isn't about the leaks themselves, but avoiding completely and totally unnecessary harm to random people by following basic publishing standards.

    That's beyond even selective leaking or refusing to leak things that aren't targeting the "right people", it's about basic respect and human decency. That's my gripe with Wikileaks. They systematically showed they don't care in the slightest who they hurt as long as it's done in the name of the cause.

    6 votes