nacho's recent activity

  1. Comment on Don’t farm bugs in ~humanities

    nacho
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    I was also bugged (heh.) by that. By that measure, isn't the chance that fish, seafood, birds and other more complex creatures used as food are sentient approaching 100%? Shouldn't they then be...

    I was also bugged (heh.) by that.

    For whatever it might be worth, our current view is that insects are about 20-40 per cent likely to be sentient, given the evidence available. But for our purposes here, we will simply assume that there is a non-negligible chance that insects are sentient, by which we mean that insects are at least 1 per cent likely to be sentient.

    By that measure, isn't the chance that fish, seafood, birds and other more complex creatures used as food are sentient approaching 100%?

    Shouldn't they then be treated way differently in life and not in the least when they're killed? That'd take precedence over insects though right? If so, how many insect lives should be weighted against that of, say, a pig?


    Again, a very interesting submission indeed as the arguments and concerns to balance are so different.

    5 votes
  2. Comment on Don’t farm bugs in ~humanities

    nacho
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    This is a very interesting article. I agree with a lot of the major principles in it, but the interesting thing is when the author makes a lot of what to me are very strange, counter-intuitive or...

    This is a very interesting article. I agree with a lot of the major principles in it, but the interesting thing is when the author makes a lot of what to me are very strange, counter-intuitive or straight up nonsensical arguments.

    Essentially, if we look at insects in isolation, yes there are very clear reasons as to why we should treat insects (and everything else better), but the reality is that humans as a species treat obviously sentient animals way, way worse in existing food production.

    Shouldn't we minimize harm and pain where we KNOW it exists among highly intelligent animals like pigs, cows etc. and probably intelligent animals like many types of fish even though that goes at the expense of possibly less sentient insects?

    How realistic is it that people consider the welfare of insects, when people still eat bacon even though pigs are smarter than pet dogs, and live abhorrent lives?


    The main argument, and many interesting examples make this an interesting read, even though some of the arguments and comparisons are way out there.

    The question, rather, is how to minimise unnecessary harm. This is a hard question to answer. But, as a starting point, we can consider animal welfare, global health and environmental impacts holistically when building future food systems, and we can consider the possibility of insect suffering as one important factor among many.

    This is very important indeed, even though most other factors are way more important. Global warming and food production ruining habitat and biological diversity are existential threats. Insect welfare is way higher up in a theoretical "Maslow's hierarchy of needs" for what we need to consider for food production systems and their overall sustainability.

    7 votes
  3. Comment on How Blizzard's reputation collapsed in just three years in ~games

    nacho
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    Remember how there was this huge scandal with the bro-culture at Riot Games a couple years back, and how terrible that company was towards women? There's absolutely no surprise that the rest of...

    Remember how there was this huge scandal with the bro-culture at Riot Games a couple years back, and how terrible that company was towards women?

    There's absolutely no surprise that the rest of the industry leaders who recruit from the same folks, have similar game communities and leadership face exactly the same issues. This time at Blizzard.

    I just hope we get an industry-wide conversation this time, not just one focusing on an individual company. That's the only way of changing things in the whole gaming industry.

    13 votes
  4. Comment on How did you find niche stuff before the Internet? in ~life

    nacho
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    stores (especially when travelling) conventions/events friends and acquaintances recommendations from people magazines/radio shows on niche things So mostly it's exactly the same as today,...
    • stores (especially when travelling)
    • conventions/events
    • friends and acquaintances
    • recommendations from people
    • magazines/radio shows on niche things

    So mostly it's exactly the same as today, although many of those things have (partially or fully) moved online.

    6 votes
  5. Comment on Does X cause Y? An in-depth evidence review in ~science

    nacho
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    Causality is difficult. One of the most important factors for asserting (but not proving) that x does indeed cause y is that you have a plausible, working mechanism for how x causes y....

    Causality is difficult.

    One of the most important factors for asserting (but not proving) that x does indeed cause y is that you have a plausible, working mechanism for how x causes y.

    Correlation, famously, doesn't imply causation. But Correlation with clear and probable mechaism(s) was Hume's revolutionary insight into why proving causation isn't necessary or even wanted for making smarter, evidence-based decisions in our lives.

    3 votes
  6. Comment on Olympic medal count (per capita) in ~sports

    nacho
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    This was surprising, I totally expected Norway, Sweden and Finland to be in the top for all Olympic games due to domination per capita in the Winter Olympics, but that these countries also do well...

    This was surprising,

    I totally expected Norway, Sweden and Finland to be in the top for all Olympic games due to domination per capita in the Winter Olympics, but that these countries also do well (alongside Denmark) in the summer games is quite shocking: https://medalspercapita.com/#medals-per-capita:summer


    If we want to look outside Lichtenstein's tiny population of 36.000, I think we'd be better off looking at areas with a couple hundred thousand people at least, if we're to say something about sportsmanship across the board, or super successful sporting cultures.

    I'm guessing the Trøndelag region of central Norway are clearly the best region in the world per capita of an area that size.

    Per 2018 (article in Norwegian) a population of 455.000 people had won 109 medals in the winter Olympics alone, which would make it the 15 winningest country in the winter Olympics on its own. That's a winter medal per 4174 people per 2018.

    There are also several athletes from the region that have been part of team golds during summer Olympics (Women's soccer, Women's handball, Vebjørn Rodal won 800m gold in Atlanta, Knut Knudsen won gold at 4000m track cycling in 1972, I don't dare to try figuring out silvers and bronze medals because there are so many to check regionality for)


    If we break down things further, to compare to Lichtenstein's 36.000 population, we might look at the Midtre Gauldal municipality of Norway consisting of 6238 people alongside its neighbour, Melhus (pop. 6939). Marit Bjørgen has 8 Olympic gold medals, 4 silver and 3 bronze.

    In Melhus, Jørgen Graabak has two gold and a silver, Toralf Engan has a gold, Unni Lehn has a gold (although that was Football in Sydney 2000), Oddvar Brå has 3 silver, Magnar Estenstad has three silver and Magne Thomassen has a silver, all in winter games.

    That's 27 Olympic medals across 7 athletes among a population of 13.177 people, or an Olympic medal per 454 people.

    If we're going for gold it's 12 gold for 13.177 people or a gold per 1098 inhabitants. Lichtenstein only has 2 gold and is around 16 times worse per capita by that metric.


    (As an aside, the Winer games need to seriously get some more entertaining sports so it's not just Scandinavians who compete in the sports at scale)

    5 votes
  7. Comment on A remarkable silence: Media blackout after key witness against Assange admits lying in ~news

    nacho
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    We will see in court what evidence there is, and what evidence there is not. The prosecution will present their side of the story in the courtrooms, not in the press. Western media built Assange...

    We will see in court what evidence there is, and what evidence there is not. The prosecution will present their side of the story in the courtrooms, not in the press.

    Western media built Assange up to be something he clearly is not. The story is not about a journalist being railroaded by US authorities, but about a hacker on the run trying to avoid his day in court. That's important for how the story is covered.

    As we wait for the prosecution's actual evidence, we're at a stage where twists and turns for a discredited hacker is only newsworthy to those deeply engaged with the story.

    When there are newsworthy developments in this case as it stands now, it'll get the coverage it deserves.

    7 votes
  8. Comment on A remarkable silence: Media blackout after key witness against Assange admits lying in ~news

    nacho
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    After the 2018 Muller investigation showed clearly and definitively that Wikileaks (and certainly Assange personally) worked with the Russian GRU (in the form of Guccifer 2.0) to influence US...

    After the 2018 Muller investigation showed clearly and definitively that Wikileaks (and certainly Assange personally) worked with the Russian GRU (in the form of Guccifer 2.0) to influence US elections, for some odd reason much fewer media outlets are running interference for Assange and Greenwald.

    I mean, it's been clear Assange isn't like other US whistleblowers for years, but people just haven't wanted to hear it. But after the Muller investigation, old pieces like the ghostwriter of an autobiography on Assange laying it all out from 2014 have been much more widely read. It's very damning.


    Journalist environments and defenders of journalism have wised-up because Assange is being prosecuted as a hacker. Not as a journalist revealing information in a reasonable way (which Wikileaks stopped doing in 2010. Since then random bystanders have been put in harm's way, or just straight out been doxxed.)

    Like when Wikileaks doxxed all turkish female voters 2016 or has straight up lied about the origin of documents, misconstruing public documents as new leaks that Wikileaks stands behind.


    I wrote in a comment on tildes in 2019 that I was interesting to see how many have continued to support Wikileaks against reason because they appear to want so bad that Assange and Wikileaks were their guy even though they've clearly demonstrated they're not.

    Many in media have wised up in the years after, as the speculation stories outside of courts have continued, and it's become clearer and clearer to anyone paying attention that Assange is a terrible person and a tool used by authoritarian regimes to try to subvert democracies.

    14 votes
  9. Comment on What are your favorite bits of more juvenile humor? in ~misc

    nacho
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    This photobooth challenge by two members of Pentatonix always makes me laugh so much my stomach hurts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CbHGxdid_2Y I think that's the definition of just good,...

    This photobooth challenge by two members of Pentatonix always makes me laugh so much my stomach hurts: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CbHGxdid_2Y

    I think that's the definition of just good, silly, harmless fun.

    3 votes
  10. Comment on What do you think about voting? in ~talk

    nacho
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    Flipping the question around: Why shouldn't voting be mandatory? Voter registration should be automatic and all countries should have standards that make voting practical and not time-consuming....

    Flipping the question around:

    • Why shouldn't voting be mandatory?

    Voter registration should be automatic and all countries should have standards that make voting practical and not time-consuming.

    If you're in the US, you have some of the worst protected voting rights in the western world. That's the only reason that voting is so cumbersome and time consuming some places. It boggles the mind that the Supreme court only removed wealth and tax payment requirements for voting in state elections in 1966.

    US citizens living abroad (or on US military ships/bases) were only guaranteed the vote through the absentee voting act of 1986!

    8 votes
  11. Comment on Kaspersky Password Manager had multiple problems in its password-generator, resulting in its passwords being predictable and easily brute-forced in ~comp

    nacho
    Link Parent
    If you have an account you use once a year, you can spend the time to change its password when you regularly change all the passwords for your important accounts. Or you just recover the password...

    If you have an account you use once a year, you can spend the time to change its password when you regularly change all the passwords for your important accounts.

    Or you just recover the password by using your secured email every time you use the obscure account, then to replacing the recovery password with a long string of gibberish you make no attempt to remember.

  12. Comment on Kaspersky Password Manager had multiple problems in its password-generator, resulting in its passwords being predictable and easily brute-forced in ~comp

    nacho
    Link Parent
    At minimum, every modern person needs online banking, an email with a secondary recovery email, encryption passwords for each of their digital storage units (which will always be several since we...

    At minimum, every modern person needs online banking, an email with a secondary recovery email, encryption passwords for each of their digital storage units (which will always be several since we all need either physical or digital back-ups) and passwords for each computer they have.

    There's no way it's easier to remember a minimum of 6+ strong passwords than a formula.

    Conclusion: Everyone should have a password formula.


    There are three simple keys to password formulas (beyond just regular password features like length, different character sets etc.

    • Different number of characters
    • Replacement cyphers
    • using something personal in the formula

    Others will not see the patterns because they're personal to you.


    So for example, a formula might have elements like the following I've just made up for the sake of this post alone:

    • if the first letter of the service is a vowel, the password starts with your mother-in-law's first name, shifted one letter forward alphabetically
    • if the first letter of the service is a consonant, the password starts with your dog's name shifted one letter backwards alphabetically
    • type the three last letters of the service's name as you would in an old cell text message numpad, holding shift down for symbols.
    • Is the second letter a consonant? Take the month of your birthday. It consists of two numbers. Consonants are capitalized. Take the words of the digits, start second letter, then alternate letter by letter in each word.
    • if you pay for the service, do something, if it's free, do something else.
    • Does the last character of the service's name appear in my wife's name?
      *' Is this a work account? last letter of the service, then Neighbour's surname backwards
    • Does the service's logo have red or blue? repeat the first element of the formula.

    Each person's unique mind is the limit here. We all work in different ways.

  13. Comment on Kaspersky Password Manager had multiple problems in its password-generator, resulting in its passwords being predictable and easily brute-forced in ~comp

    nacho
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Everyone should be changing the passwords on all their accounts regularly. I create a new formula and change all the passwords every few months. The only exceptions are accounts I'm happy with...

    Everyone should be changing the passwords on all their accounts regularly.

    I create a new formula and change all the passwords every few months.

    The only exceptions are accounts I'm happy with losing or someone gaining access to.

    Edit: Well, and accounts I use so seldom I recover (using my well-secured email) them every time I use them, making gibberish passwords I make no attempt to remember.

  14. Comment on Kaspersky Password Manager had multiple problems in its password-generator, resulting in its passwords being predictable and easily brute-forced in ~comp

    nacho
    Link Parent
    The key here is that you go from making individual passwords, to making a single formula that generates the unique, long, complex passwords for every service you use. You only remember the one...

    The key here is that you go from making individual passwords, to making a single formula that generates the unique, long, complex passwords for every service you use.

    You only remember the one formula, not multiple passwords.

  15. Comment on Kaspersky Password Manager had multiple problems in its password-generator, resulting in its passwords being predictable and easily brute-forced in ~comp

    nacho
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    I've advocated against on password managers on tildes for a couple of years. The response is usually negative, which is scary because password managers as a concept is fundamentally bad. Password...

    I've advocated against on password managers on tildes for a couple of years. The response is usually negative, which is scary because password managers as a concept is fundamentally bad.


    Password managers are the holy grail of hacking/cracking targets because if you get in, you get everything. A complete and integrated digital life. All the interconnected accounts mean you can recover accounts infinitely. There aren't enough services that require 2FA in ways that aren't beatable by account recovery processes to stop the take-over.


    You're much better creating your own password formula and iterate that through each site you have accounts for, then switch formula every 3 months.

    This lets you create unique, complex, rememberable passwords for every account. You're the only point of failure. Your passwords are always strong. They aren't stored anywhere. No external company is both a honey pot and the point of failure.

    3 votes
  16. Comment on Why have web pages dropped the www? in ~talk

    nacho
    Link Parent
    This is a great answer. I'd add that redirects and address bars that double as search bars mean that you get to your destination anyway, because of the points mentioned above.

    This is a great answer.

    I'd add that redirects and address bars that double as search bars mean that you get to your destination anyway, because of the points mentioned above.

    13 votes
  17. Comment on Britney Spears' conservatorship nightmare: How the pop star's father and a team of lawyers seized control of her life - and have held on to it for thirteen years in ~music

    nacho
    Link Parent
    My experience with concert musicians and people I know in professional bands and acquaintances who do live tv or radio is that some people live for having an audience and feed off playing. The...

    My experience with concert musicians and people I know in professional bands and acquaintances who do live tv or radio is that some people live for having an audience and feed off playing. The bigger crowd the better. Some have taken puse measurements of themselves that strongly indicate they aren't stressed before going on, nor in front of crowds of hundreds, thousands and in at least one case a couple million people.


    I will point out that if Spears' mental state is one where she can't take care of herself, your last argument is nonsensical. In that case, not sharing her personal details cannot be taken as an argument against the conservators. The argument only works if she is in a mental state where she doesn't need a conservatorship:

    • If Spears is not of sound mind, her conservators are obligated not to share her personal details despite her own wishes.
    • The courts are the ones who determine whether or not Spers requires a conservatorship.

    The courts have determined Spears requires a conservatorship.

    • The conservators are obligated to protect her from herself in the courts' view.
    • It is up to the conservators to determine what information Spears should share about herself because the courts have found she cannot do so herself.
    1 vote
  18. Comment on Britney Spears' conservatorship nightmare: How the pop star's father and a team of lawyers seized control of her life - and have held on to it for thirteen years in ~music

    nacho
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    Power of attorney is completely different to conservatorship. They don't fulfill the same role. Generally speaking: Power of attorney must be voluntarily given by someone of sound mind. It can be...

    Power of attorney is completely different to conservatorship. They don't fulfill the same role.

    Generally speaking:

    • Power of attorney must be voluntarily given by someone of sound mind. It can be revoked unilaterally by the principal.
    • Conservatorship isn't a private legal agreement. It's applied by courts after someone is found mentally incapacitated. The court administrates the conservatorship and it must be revoked by a court.

    Simply put, power of attorney can't normally bind someone against their will. Even if clauses in the contract seem to suggest otherwise, they are usually found to be nonbinding when tested in court.

  19. Comment on Britney Spears' conservatorship nightmare: How the pop star's father and a team of lawyers seized control of her life - and have held on to it for thirteen years in ~music

    nacho
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    How do you know that the defense of "doing it for her mental health" is weak? Spears' medical records aren't public. All the court documents from years of litigation aren't public. I completely...

    How do you know that the defense of "doing it for her mental health" is weak?

    Spears' medical records aren't public. All the court documents from years of litigation aren't public.


    I feel like you're making this a little easy to simply say "Everyone in this story has something to lose and something to gain, therefore we cannot believe a side."

    I completely agree that it'd be silly to draw a false equivalence and assume everyone's biased, so we can pick and choose who to believe.

    That's why I said something completely different:

    There are so many people around Britney Spears who stand to gain or lose huge amounts of money, influence, second-hand celebrity and/or gained/lost ethos based on this matter that they aren't dispassionate witnesses. Everyone interviewed [ In court and/or in the linked article] is a player in the case.


    if the conservators are not commenting, then we don't have much else to go on.

    Here I disagree passionately. We could have real investigative journalism. The journalists would then "cross examine" the view they're putting on record since they can't get the other side on record. They'd be devil's advocates and explore alternatives and what the other side might say.

    Here's an example:

    • Say we were to examine whether or not someone has "had their legal rights to self-determination" removed for 13 years being "exploited for a ridiculous amount of money"
    • If we examine that presumption, are there other reasonable explanations to explore?

    We could look at a number of things (again, since we aren't psychiatrists, and even if we were shouldn't diagnose someone from afar.)

    1. Could Spears maybe not have a sound mind and be in a state that she can take care of herself?
    2. Cold Spears enjoy being a world famous superstar and get a kick off performing, so she'd do it for other reasons than money?
    3. Are there aspects or signs in Spears' past/present life that could impact mental wellbeing?
    4. What do the medical professionals in Spears' life say? What have they previously said in court? We should probably lend lots of weight to what they say, as medical professionals and not direct parties in the case, but expert witnesses.

    I'm worried that people are getting only one side presented, and they're going with only that one side.

    It's very possible that Spears could be taken advantage of by her conservators. But unless people have some incredible non-public access available to them, Britney Spears could very well be in need of conservatorship. That's a real possibility. This is a huge, high profile case, which is when the justice system is often works better than it does for normal people without the same resources.