no_exit's recent activity

  1. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

    no_exit
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    I finally came back around and finished this on PC after a 7-8 hour start on the xbox version, it was worth the wait to play with smooth frames and to have my mind blown with stuff I was missing...

    I finally came back around and finished this on PC after a 7-8 hour start on the xbox version, it was worth the wait to play with smooth frames and to have my mind blown with stuff I was missing the first time around.

    spoilers completely lucked out with discovering a few different key things, like how to access some of the Quantum Shrines, and also figured out the final Ash Twin puzzle naturally which was very satisfying.

    there's just so much cool stuff to gush about, literally every location has so much narrative impact with sometimes nothing more than a couple lines of text. fully understanding what the loop actually means and choosing to resolve the recursion, and the ending is spectacular and bittersweet and beautiful

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Daily thread for news/updates/discussion of George Floyd protests - June 10 in ~news

    no_exit
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    Vietnam veterans were not hated or shunned, it's a persistent right-wing myth ginned up because the anti-war movement at the time was so successful in recruiting returning veterans. Check out The...

    Vietnam veterans were not hated or shunned, it's a persistent right-wing myth ginned up because the anti-war movement at the time was so successful in recruiting returning veterans. Check out The Spitting Image.

    5 votes
  3. Comment on 'Man becomes the sex organs of the machine world: Marshall McLuhan’s Understanding Media' (2012) in ~humanities

    no_exit
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    Good read, makes me want to rewatch Serial Experiments Lain. This translation (in the 'profane reduction' sense) is very apparent to me in the gamification of our memories by social media. from...

    Good read, makes me want to rewatch Serial Experiments Lain.

    We are, as McLuhan asserted, translating our entire lives into the spiritual medium of information; but whether that spiritual information will ultimately be reduced into a series of points and vectors in a decidedly profane market-place remains to be seen.

    This translation (in the 'profane reduction' sense) is very apparent to me in the gamification of our memories by social media.

    Beyond journals, we extend our cognition via all sorts of memory objects. Prior to the advent of computers and the Internet, these objects had been material, physical, and personally owned. Each of us had our own journals, photographs, mixtapes, maps, lists, and so on. After the information and communications technology revolution, all of that changed; homo sapiens physicus became homo sapiens systemicus as our physical lives began to be offloaded into the cloud. Instead of each of us owning a map—something that is in itself a simulacra, given that a “map is not the territory represented” (Science and Sanity, Alfred Korzybski)—we view highly detailed maps of the world online, are provided the quickest directions, and track our progress to our destination with a few finger strokes. In effect, the physical simulacra has been, and is increasingly being, dematerialized, creating second-order simulacra—a simulacrum of a simulacrum.

    In terms of individual convenience, this rapid dematerialization has been perceived as almost entirely positive; much of our mental and physical spaces have been decluttered. But in exchange for this convenience, we have begun to cede the creation, ownership, maintenance, and control of our memory objects—the records which help constitute and reconstitute the dynamic narratives of our lives. We increasingly rely on what Molly Sauter refers to as “digital reminiscence systems” such as Facebook, which “prod us to create specific kinds of digital memory objects, those that are algorithmically recognizable and categorizable, as part of their functionality.”

    from Simulacra & Self-Simulation in Protean Magazine

    4 votes
  4. Comment on Protests over death of George Floyd disrupt Minneapolis, and beyond in ~news

    no_exit
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    No, and you're being actively disingenuous by saying I am. I said sending borderline unaccountable people with guns whose options are to either arrest, kill, or do nothing (and who FREQUENTLY do...

    Are you actually advocating that nothing be done for it?

    No, and you're being actively disingenuous by saying I am. I said sending borderline unaccountable people with guns whose options are to either arrest, kill, or do nothing (and who FREQUENTLY do nothing by their own choice, even when explicitly asked for help) is counterproductive to actually treating the problem.

    I was 18. I reported it. I was covered in bruises. People vouched for me. There was pictures and evidence. The cops did nothing for me.

    I quit eventually as I couldn’t handle it anymore. The constant violence against women and children. The constant ways the police stood by and let it happen, ignored it, arrested victims with the abusers for “equality”, laughed it off, argued with us — the advocates.

    Quotes from the linked thread you didn't read.

    Who responds to that?

    People who actually care about the victim and will support them through the entire process.

    1 vote
  5. Comment on After a staff uproar, New York Times says that Senator Tom Cotton’s “Send In the Troops” op-ed it published yesterday did not meet its standards in ~news

  6. Comment on Protests over death of George Floyd disrupt Minneapolis, and beyond in ~news

    no_exit
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    Whatever good the police do is incidental to their mission and can be handled in better ways without them. For example: How many people don't report domestic violence because they know getting the...

    For whatever evil you think of police, they do good in a lot of ways that never gets recognized.

    Whatever good the police do is incidental to their mission and can be handled in better ways without them. For example:

    who responds to the man beating his wife?

    How many people don't report domestic violence because they know getting the police involved will make things worse? How many cases have been ignored or minimized because the cop is a domestic abuser themselves, which they have a significantly higher chance than the average person of being? Police are literally allowed to use consent as a valid defense for raping someone in their custody in a majority of US states. Here's another thread from a domestic violence counselor on the subject. Why the automatic presumption that armed state agents, whose main tool for dealing with a problem is violence, are the best solution?

    1 vote
  7. Comment on Protests over death of George Floyd disrupt Minneapolis, and beyond in ~news

    no_exit
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    Police are glorified to absurd levels and are one of the most respected institutions in the country. This despite their job not even being in the top 10 most dangerous nationally. Officers in some...

    Defunding them is just going to result in even fewer good officers because who wants to be in a profession where you're hated, called "pig", and risk your life every day for 40k a year because of the actions of a relative few?

    Police are glorified to absurd levels and are one of the most respected institutions in the country. This despite their job not even being in the top 10 most dangerous nationally. Officers in some of the most thuggish forces (NYPD for example) routinely make 150k or more.

    Less money means less body cams, less qualified officers, less training....

    Body cams have no effect on police violence. Training has no efffect on police violence.

    how would recommend policing be done in the US?

    It shouldn't be, it's a racist, classist institution from its very beginnings. Abolish it and put the money towards addressing the actual causes of the majority of crime.

    2 votes
  8. Comment on Daily thread for news/updates/discussion of George Floyd protests - June 1 in ~news

  9. Comment on Protests over death of George Floyd disrupt Minneapolis, and beyond in ~news

    no_exit
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    Minneapolis spent 3 years and almost 5 million dollars specifically on de-escalation training and community relations after the 2014/15 Uprisings. That sure seems like it helped.

    Minneapolis spent 3 years and almost 5 million dollars specifically on de-escalation training and community relations after the 2014/15 Uprisings. That sure seems like it helped.

    That’s because “procedural justice” has nothing to say about the mission or function of policing. It assumes that the police are neutrally enforcing a set of laws that are automatically beneficial to everyone. Instead of questioning the validity of using police to wage an inherently racist war on drugs, advocates of “procedural justice” politely suggest that police get anti-bias training, which they will happily deliver for no small fee.

    4 votes
  10. Comment on Protests over death of George Floyd disrupt Minneapolis, and beyond in ~news

    no_exit
    Link Parent
    A lot of it is milsurp like olive pointed out, but then there's maintenance costs, storage costs, new officers to drive the thing, grenade launchers to teargas the terrorist who hocks a loogie on...

    A lot of it is milsurp like olive pointed out, but then there's maintenance costs, storage costs, new officers to drive the thing, grenade launchers to teargas the terrorist who hocks a loogie on it.... Once they have it, they're going to invent reasons to use it.

    5 votes
  11. Comment on Protests over death of George Floyd disrupt Minneapolis, and beyond in ~news

    no_exit
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    I don't care. Police are almost always the largest single line item in budgets. A city of 50,000 I've lived in had a fucking MRAP and a giant LRAD. They don't need that shit. If police have the...

    I'd wager most police departments across the country simply can't afford to lose out on any money.

    I don't care. Police are almost always the largest single line item in budgets. A city of 50,000 I've lived in had a fucking MRAP and a giant LRAD. They don't need that shit. If police have the money they're going to spend it on stuff used to brutalize people, because that's their primary function. We're about to face a huge wave of austerity from the pandemic and probable recession/depression, our money needs to be spent on things that positively affect our communities.

    9 votes
  12. Comment on Protests over death of George Floyd disrupt Minneapolis, and beyond in ~news

    no_exit
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    At the bare minimum, police need to be massively defunded everywhere.

    At the bare minimum, police need to be massively defunded everywhere.

    4 votes
  13. Comment on Protests over death of George Floyd disrupt Minneapolis, and beyond in ~news

    no_exit
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    There's now curfews in a lot of places, seems like a big test of whether things are going to keep escalating or not.

    There's now curfews in a lot of places, seems like a big test of whether things are going to keep escalating or not.

    3 votes
  14. Comment on Protests over death of George Floyd disrupt Minneapolis, and beyond in ~news

    no_exit
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    In the past 3 hours I've seen pictures of squad cars on fire in NYC, Atlanta, and Richmond. I'm in awe. https://brooklynbailfund.org/donate

    In the past 3 hours I've seen pictures of squad cars on fire in NYC, Atlanta, and Richmond. I'm in awe.

    https://brooklynbailfund.org/donate

    4 votes
  15. Comment on Protests over death of George Floyd disrupt Minneapolis, and beyond in ~news

  16. Comment on The decline and fall of the spectacle-commodity economy in ~misc

    no_exit
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    This is a short essay by Guy Debord, one of the founding members of the Situationists, written about the 1965 Watts Rebellion in LA. Specifically, he argues that riots and 'looting' are conscious...

    This is a short essay by Guy Debord, one of the founding members of the Situationists, written about the 1965 Watts Rebellion in LA. Specifically, he argues that riots and 'looting' are conscious attacks on the capitalist commodity-form.

    Looting is a natural response to the unnatural and inhuman society of commodity abundance. It instantly undermines the commodity as such, and it also exposes what the commodity ultimately implies: the army, the police and the other specialized detachments of the state’s monopoly of armed violence.

    For those who reduce people to objects, objects seem to acquire human qualities and truly human manifestations appear as unconscious “animal behavior.” Thus the chief humanist of Los Angeles, William Parker, could say: “They started acting like a bunch of monkeys in a zoo.”

    Capitalism has become sufficiently concentrated and interlinked with the state to distribute “welfare” to the poorest. But by the very fact that they lag behind in the advance of socially organized survival, the blacks pose the problems of life; what they are really demanding is not to survive but to live.

    h/t to @prolewave on twitter, they have a couple other essays on the topic linked here

    3 votes
  17. Comment on The death of George Floyd, in context in ~misc

    no_exit
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    the gofundme for Floyd's family is here bail fund for protestors is here

    the gofundme for Floyd's family is here

    bail fund for protestors is here

    8 votes