vili's recent activity

  1. Comment on What is a scam that people should know about? in ~life

    vili Link Parent
    Here in Hungary, DHL (as well as most other delivery companies) will in fact call you if they are at your door and no one is answering the door bell. That said, most of the time they actually call...

    Here in Hungary, DHL (as well as most other delivery companies) will in fact call you if they are at your door and no one is answering the door bell. That said, most of the time they actually call you about 10 minutes before your delivery asking if you are at the address.

    1 vote
  2. Comment on What are the minimal features every good blog should have? in ~comp

    vili Link Parent
    I feel that these two sentences contradict each other. Unless you know for certain that your only user group is desktop users, the kind of responsive design where mobile is an afterthought is a...

    Part of the reason I'm doing this is to keep my programming knowledge up to date ... I'm coding for PC users, and figure I'll let the mobile aspect of things take care of itself

    I feel that these two sentences contradict each other. Unless you know for certain that your only user group is desktop users, the kind of responsive design where mobile is an afterthought is a badly outdated design paradigm. I would definitely recommend looking into a modern mobile first type approach where the foundation of the design is usable on any screen size, and you build on top of that when serving content to users with larger screens. Just keep in mind that mobile first is not mobile only.

    When done correctly, this speeds up loading times for mobile users, saves bandwidth, and should also help your discoverability as Google is moving towards purely mobile first indexing.

    8 votes
  3. Comment on 4 words poetry challenge in ~creative

  4. Comment on 4 words poetry challenge in ~creative

    vili Link Parent
    Humanist degree Finally pays!

    Humanist degree
    Finally pays!

    2 votes
  5. Comment on 4 words poetry challenge in ~creative

    vili Link Parent
    Epäjärjestelmällistyttämättömyydellisyydettömyydellänsähänkökään: agglutinatives also cool!

    Epäjärjestelmällistyttämättömyydellisyydettömyydellänsähänkökään:
    agglutinatives also cool!

    2 votes
  6. Comment on 4 words poetry challenge in ~creative

    vili (edited ) Link
    Tuntussuqatarniksaitengqiggtuq! Polysynthetic languages win

    Tuntussuqatarniksaitengqiggtuq!
    Polysynthetic languages win

    3 votes
  7. Comment on It's Eurovision week! How will you watch the competition? Which song is your favourite? What are your predictions? in ~music

    vili Link
    I never listen to the songs ahead of time, as I think that's just wrong. :) Unless I'm mistaken, the competition used to prohibit any sort of public (i.e. radio) play before the event, and I think...

    I never listen to the songs ahead of time, as I think that's just wrong. :) Unless I'm mistaken, the competition used to prohibit any sort of public (i.e. radio) play before the event, and I think it worked much better when the songs were new for almost all viewers. Nowadays, of course, you have national competitions to choose the acts, and YouTube and social media to promote the people, so it would be impossible to police that, but I think it's a little unfair towards those acts who can't afford to have a big promotional machine behind them. But then again, it's never really been that much about the music, has it? Or maybe it was in the 90s, but then we had Ireland winning every year.

    Anyway, every year we get together with friends for the final, prepare an insane amount of food and snacks, maybe a drink or two*, play board games and stay in the garden during the day if the weather permits, and then just enjoy the campy comedy that unfolds once the broadcast starts. The semi-finals, I just watch with my wife.

    My predictions, despite having practically no idea who is participating: Most of my favourites won't make it to the final. The UK won't score many points. Russia will be competing for victory, primarily with points from the televote. France will have a song in French, but maybe with a few words of English. Sweden will give us an immaculately crafted and annoyingly catchy pop song. But even then, after enough awkward moments with this year's hosts and some absolutely lame jokes that the broadcast delivers us, everyone will secretly hope that Sweden wins again so that we at least get their hosts and production values next year. And finally, despite whatever they do with the voting system, we'll know the winner long before the vote ends. And as a bonus prediction for this year: there will be at least one awkward moment somewhere when the current geopolitical situation in the host country is mentioned, and somewhat clumsily muted by the broadcast.

    * One year I realised that I had somehow from my travels acquired spirits from almost every country participating in the competition, and since I don't really drink I had them just lying around in the pantry, so I did what any reasonable person would do: decide to take a shot every time a song came on from a country that I had a bottle from. I got about a third into the first semi-final when I came to the conclusion that this was not one of my brightest ideas ever.

    2 votes
  8. Comment on What are some quality mobile games? in ~games

    vili Link Parent
    Any tips on Downwell, or rather how to approach it? I own it on PC but haven't really been able to understand the attraction, which likely means that I either just don't get something, or my...

    Any tips on Downwell, or rather how to approach it? I own it on PC but haven't really been able to understand the attraction, which likely means that I either just don't get something, or my reflexes simply aren't good enough to enjoy it. I can get through a few levels and then I'm dead, usually from something I did not see coming.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on What are some quality mobile games? in ~games

    vili Link
    Arkanoid vs Space Invaders is a surprisingly brilliant remix of the two classic games, and one of the few of its type that is not built on in-app purchases. Rusty Lake is a pretty nice series of...

    Arkanoid vs Space Invaders is a surprisingly brilliant remix of the two classic games, and one of the few of its type that is not built on in-app purchases.

    Rusty Lake is a pretty nice series of free and paid room escape type puzzle games with each game pushing you a little deeper into a somewhat David Lynchian story.

    Hoplite is a wonderfully elegant design.

    If you love classic strategy board games, use Android, and fairly high complexity + functional graphics don't scare you away, check out this developer's various turn based strategy games which are modelled after historical battles. Full disclosure: the developer is a friend of mine, but I wouldn't recommend the games if I didn't think they are good.

    Also on Android, Simon Tatham's Portable Puzzle Collection is an excellent collection of over 40 classic one-player puzzle games.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on What’s your favorite soup? in ~food

    vili Link
    Salmon soup is an integral part of the Finnish identity. It works both as a quick weekday meal as well as for more festive occasions. It warms your soul, embraces your taste buds and boosts your...

    Salmon soup is an integral part of the Finnish identity. It works both as a quick weekday meal as well as for more festive occasions. It warms your soul, embraces your taste buds and boosts your body. The recipe varies from household to household, but this one has the basics.

    Gulyás is an even more integral part of the Hungarian identity. It works both as a winter warmer as well as a summer food, and is particularly good when made over open fire. Again, recipes vary widely, but this looks good to me (I would leave out the pasta though).

    3 votes
  11. Comment on Recommend me a game that _________. in ~games

    vili Link Parent
    I absolutely love Catherine and while I haven't found anything exactly like it, I'm currently playing Persona 5. It's by the same maker and very similar in terms of art, music and mood. Instead of...

    I absolutely love Catherine and while I haven't found anything exactly like it, I'm currently playing Persona 5. It's by the same maker and very similar in terms of art, music and mood. Instead of Catherine's puzzle mechanism, Persona 5 has a more traditional JRPG turn based combat gameplay loop, but even as someone who is typically a bit allergic to JRPGs, I'm absolutely loving it. The battles are well designed and very much puzzles in themselves. Just like Catherine has its daytime sequences, in Persona 5 you manage your relationships, stats and story progression by hanging out with others, but instead of being largely confined to a single bar as in Catherine, Persona 5 offers you multiple locations to visit. It actually becomes something of a turn based time management game in that respect, as there's so much to do and so little time.

    While I'm not even halfway through the game, I feel I can definitely recommend Persona 5 if you enjoyed Catherine.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on Recommend me a game that _________. in ~games

    vili Link Parent
    Rusty Lake is a collection of short free games under the series title Cube Escape and three larger paid games under the Rusty Lake moniker. Available on PC and mobile devices. As you progress...

    Rusty Lake is a collection of short free games under the series title Cube Escape and three larger paid games under the Rusty Lake moniker. Available on PC and mobile devices.

    As you progress through the games (here's a list), you come to learn more about the titular Rusty Lake and the events that have unfolded there. Part adventure game series, part room escape, part Twin Peaks, the series slowly draws you into its story and world without really explaining too much.

    1 vote
  13. Comment on Recommend me a game that _________. in ~games

    vili (edited ) Link Parent
    I assume that by Myst you refer to the series, but just in case: the sequels build upon the original and Riven in particular is generally considered an improvement. The Room games are in many ways...

    I assume that by Myst you refer to the series, but just in case: the sequels build upon the original and Riven in particular is generally considered an improvement.

    The Room games are in many ways like a "Myst mini", or a puzzle box within a puzzle box.

    Kairo has a very minimalistic, but I think still quite wondrous approach to its environments, as well as a great atmosphere.

    The 7th Guest is an old one but a personal favourite that received a remaster recently. My dirty little secret is that while I recognise the game's many flaws, I actually prefer it over the first Myst game.

    I suppose you have already played Portal and its sequel? Highly praised and I would say justifiably so.

    The Talos Principle is more Portal than it's The Witness. Many seem to love it to bits, but personally I found its puzzles a little inelegant and uninteresting. But it's worth checking out.

    Return of the Obra Dinn has a pretty unique puzzle mechanism, well designed progression, a great style, and an interesting story and setting to explore.

    Quern has been highly praised but I haven't gotten to it yet. It's often labelled the "modern Myst" (or was, before Obduction) so I really should.

    Antichamber is similarly highly praised and it's similarly still in my pile of unplayed games.

    If you don't mind doing your environmental exploration within a 2D pixel world, Fez is a brilliant experience.

    Gorogoa is another 2D game that innovates with its puzzle mechanism and presentation. Not all that much exploration, though.

    In fact, if you don't insist on the environmental exploration and just want interesting puzzles and well-crafted progression, as with the puzzle design of The Witness, I can highly recommend Snakebird, Sokobond, A Good Snowman is Hard to Build, Cosmic Express, Stephen's Sausage Roll and Braid.

    And finally, as a blatant act of self promotion: Hexed Space is a game I'm developing and while its environments are story driven rather than visual, I have worked hard to make its progression challenging, fair and interesting. It's not out yet, though. Real life keeps getting in the way of finishing it. In any case, The Witness was actually the game that originally pushed me to start the development.

    7 votes
  14. Comment on What is the most creative app or website you know of? in ~creative

    vili Link
    The artist formerly alive as Prince had some pretty creative, if not entirely practical websites. They tended to come and go with his whims, as did a lot of his other projects, but after his...

    The artist formerly alive as Prince had some pretty creative, if not entirely practical websites. They tended to come and go with his whims, as did a lot of his other projects, but after his passing a fan maintained website called the Prince Online Museum was opened. It hosts copies of Prince's old websites and functions as a pretty lovely collection of both Prince's legacy and the history of the world wide web as it developed between 1995 and 2013.

    2 votes
  15. Comment on What are your top three favorite games of all time? in ~games

    vili Link
    Republic of Rome is hands down my favourite board game. 4-6 players take the roles of political factions in pre-imperial Rome. It has a very unique gameplay system where the players work together...

    Republic of Rome is hands down my favourite board game. 4-6 players take the roles of political factions in pre-imperial Rome. It has a very unique gameplay system where the players work together to keep Rome afloat and safe from external threats while each tries to manoeuvre themselves to a position where they can take total control over the Republic, basically becoming Caesar and ending the Republic. It's a co-operative game where all players can lose but it's also a cut-throat competition where only one player can win. Just like real-life politics.

    Our group gets together once a year to play and over the years our games have taken anywhere between 4 and 18 hours to complete. This year's game, which lasted for 14.5 hours, was actually the first one in ten years where someone won. There was much jubilation. Then again, there was also 12 bottles of wine, two warm meals, lots of snacks, a sauna, and all the other standards that we arrange for our annual games.

    Will RoR ever be surpassed? It definitely should be. Frankly, I'm a little surprised that this 30-year-old game hasn't been bettered, although there are a couple of designs inspired by it which I haven't tried yet and have heard good things about. RoR's rules are unnecessarily complicated and inelegant, the latest edition's board and cards have numerous mistakes, a full game can take a long time to finish, and as a player you can end up in a position where you are out of the game for hours, with very little to do. But that's what the wine, the grapes, the cheese plates and the great company are there for. And despite its dated design, it is an absolutely unique experience, if you do it right.


    Emlyn Hughes International Soccer is probably my most played computer game. I'm not sure if it's my favourite one, but it's something that I have kept coming back to over and over again, so it might well be. I own six Commodore 64s just so that I can play the original for years to come. Back in the early 2000s I even tracked down one of the programmers and visited his home (yes, I was invited). You could say I have been obsessed by this game.

    Why? It may not be the kind of simulation that games like FIFA or PES attempt to be, nor does it showcase the arcade perfection of the Kick Off and Sensible Soccer series. But it's a brilliantly tactical game. A game of skill and precision. And one where you can score a goal with your heel. Or the back of your head. Or your butt. If you are good enough, that is. It may not look like much, but there is a lot of complexity and elegance in its simple systems.


    2300 AD is my all-time favourite role playing game. It combines hard scifi with a brilliantly outdated early 80s vision of what the future would look and act like. Our group practically ignored the handful of alien species in it and concentrated on the geopolitical struggles between the French and German galactic empires. That is, until we ultimately got caught up in the Kafer war, came in contact with a space-time continuum portal, and things got a bit complicated towards the end. Years later, as I was watching the end of Interstellar, my brain went "yup, been there, done that".

    Every pen-and-paper role playing game is of course only as good as its game master and players. We had a great group and a game that lasted for about six years (while we also played a parallel fantasy game campaign). I have many great memories from that imaginary world. Actually, whenever the first winter frost comes with its peculiar smell of half frozen ground, I for some inexplicable reason think of Beta Canum Venaticorum, a particularly interesting system found in the French arm of the galaxy. I'm not sure why, but that's what happens.

    As a rules system, 2300 AD wasn't particularly innovative or interesting. As was usual with our role playing games, we did a good job of ignoring the rules and concentrating on the story and the world. Will it ever be surpassed? Probably not for me, as I haven't had a role playing group for over a decade now and can't really imagine being able to find one any time soon.

    3 votes
  16. Comment on What's a common misconception or misunderstanding you would love to see corrected? in ~talk

    vili Link Parent
    That is indeed a very interesting TED talk. Keith Chen's ideas have influenced others as well, including this more recent article that suggests that the language one speaks affects their...

    That is indeed a very interesting TED talk. Keith Chen's ideas have influenced others as well, including this more recent article that suggests that the language one speaks affects their willingness to take action against climate change.

    One thing that seems to be common between the people behind these theories is that none of them are actually linguists, so you can probably guess how linguists tend to feel about these ideas. While it's been years since I actually looked at Chen's work related to this TED talk and he may well have updated his ideas since, I must say that I'm personally also quite skeptical. While he was able to present an impressive amount of data, I (like most others) felt that he wasn't really able to distinguish between causation and correlation, and that sociological rather than linguistic reasons seemed more likely candidates for what he is talking about. Some of his linguistic classifications also seemed quite off, which didn't help.

    Still, the idea that he presents certainly is intriguing. I remember that at the time this came out there were calls to set up experiments to test some of Chen's claims in a controlled setting, but I haven't heard that anything like that would have been done.

    5 votes
  17. Comment on What's a common misconception or misunderstanding you would love to see corrected? in ~talk

    vili Link Parent
    Colour words are an excellent example of how language may affect thinking and how this sort of relationship is hotly debated in the field. The basis of the debate is in a study by Brent Berlin and...

    Colour words are an excellent example of how language may affect thinking and how this sort of relationship is hotly debated in the field.

    The basis of the debate is in a study by Brent Berlin and Paul Kay who in the late 60s suggested a continuum of colour terms in languages, which goes roughly like this:

    1. If a language has only two words for colours (the minimum attested), they are always equivalent to "dark" and "light".

    2. If a language has three words for colours, the third word added to the above will invariably be "red".

    3. If a language has four words for colours, the fourth word is either "green" or "yellow", and if a language has five colour words it has both of them.

    4. The sixth colour word will be for "blue".

    5. Then, for "brown".

    6. And only after that other colour words pop up.

    Since this was shown to be pretty universal across unrelated languages, it would indicate that it's not the languages that are necessarily driving cognition here, but the other way around, human cognition having some sort of a universal that manifests itself in our languages.

    However, naturally things aren't quite as simple as presented above and there is actually more variation, although still not as much as to suggest colour word inventories to be in any way random. You can read a bit more about this here and here.

    Also, note that when pop articles discuss this, the topic tends to be (understandably) simplified greatly, as it is in the Business Insider video that you linked to. The video for instance claims that English has no term for "light blue". Well, "light blue" in itself is a term, so English certainly can express it. Similarly, English has many different words for different shades of blue, like "azure", "capri", "cyan", "denim" and so on. There are also plenty of studies that show that women tend to use and recognise a larger variety of colour words than men do, and they also tend to differentiate between colour hues and shades more readily. This is regardless of what language they speak, so again it doesn't seem that it's just language that affects our colour perception.

    In addition to colour words, another interesting example of how language and cognition interface is in directional vocabulary. In English, we are pretty accustomed to talking about "left" and "right", but there are many languages where these words don't exist. Instead, where an English speaker would use those words, speakers of those languages may for instance use compass directions (north, west, east, south). Note the big cognitive difference between the two: one is "egocentric", i.e. defined by a person's position in the world (what's my "left" depends entirely on where I'm facing), while the other is "geocentric", i.e. defined by the world around them. There are also languages that use some locally defined features: for instance, speakers of some languages that are spoken in societies that live their lives on large hillsides use the words "uphill" and "downhill" rather than "left" and "right".

    If you are interested in reading more about these type of things from a book accessible to just about anyone, I can recommend Guy Deutscher's Through the Language Glass: Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages. Just keep in mind while reading that Deutscher is arguing for the idea that language indeed affects thought. There are many that argue against it. This debate over the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, or linguistic relativity has been a fierce one, especially among armchair linguists, who have learnt to attack anyone who dares to suggest that language affects thinking.

    In fact, this is a topic that seems very dear to many hobbyist linguists (and I suppose understandably so), but isn't that central to what most academic linguists do in their research. My personal view is that there is no simplistic answer for this and no one is entirely right or wrong: language, thinking, culture and the world around you all interact with each other constantly and influence one another.

    Within linguistics, it is the subfield of cognitive linguistics that is most interested in these things. I don't have much to do with cognitive linguistics (or these days really with academic linguistics at all), but one avenue of research that I have personally found very interesting in cognitive linguistics is that of conceptual metaphors. Take the concept of "time", for instance. In English, you can "spend time" and you can "waste time" and you can "invest time" and you can live on "borrowed time", and so on. It seems like in English, time is quite literally money. But this is an English thing. While it exists in some other languages as well, most languages have other metaphoric constructs for time and in them, those expressions, if literally translated, would not make much sense. Finnish, for instance, builds its time metaphors around some sort of a container object that can be filled, used and worn out.

    In the end, the world we live in is very complex and therefore very little of what we talk about is solidly concrete, and so a lot of our language use is actually built on this type of metaphors, whether we consciously realise it or not. A valid question then is how much these types of systems of conceptual metaphors affect our thinking and behaviour. This is another much debated topic and one that many linguists say is complete nonsense. But if you are interested in it, a good classic introduction to conceptual metaphor would be George Lakoff and Mark Johnson's Metaphors We Live By, which kind of introduced the idea. Again, remember that the authors are arguing for a specific type of interpretation of how language and cognition works and there are many who have argued against them, so don't take anything as the ultimate truth.

    Linguistics is a relatively young field and its subfields like cognitive linguistics are even younger. We simply don't really know everything. Or really even that much.

    27 votes
  18. Comment on What's a common misconception or misunderstanding you would love to see corrected? in ~talk

    vili (edited ) Link
    From a linguist's point of view, considering that practically everyone over a certain age uses a language or languages daily, it is fascinating how many misconceptions people have about this skill...

    From a linguist's point of view, considering that practically everyone over a certain age uses a language or languages daily, it is fascinating how many misconceptions people have about this skill that could be argued is the single most important aspect that separates us from other animals.

    In other words:

    • No, your language is not the most difficult and/or the most expressive in the world. No such things really exist. Difficulty only exists in relative terms (German is more difficult for a Japanese speaker than for a Dutch speaker to learn) and children around the world acquire their mother tongues with fairly similar rates. All human languages can express the same things, although they of course do it in different ways. Still, complexities in one part of a language (say, a complicated case system) tend to be balanced by fewer complexities in other areas (say, less complex word order rules).

    • I have further bad news for you: your language isn't the oldest one in the world, either. Languages are constantly changing, so talking about the "oldest" language is fairly meaningless. There may or may not have been a single proto-language from which all other languages derive, but we simply do not know. Actually, the whole concept of "language" as an immutable entity is a misconception (although often a useful one), as languages tend to exist with a continuum of dialects, and where one language ends and another begins is often more of a political decision than anything else.

    • In fact, that new thing that everyone is saying that is different from how you would like things to be said is not a corruption of language but simply a sign of the language changing. The kind of words and expressions that you consider correct were once similarly new and old people were complaining how they were corrupting their language. Don't be one of those old people and just accept that languages keep changing. So, @gpl (link), I'm afraid it's already "ATM machine" as well as just "ATM". ;) (Edit: Although I do of course understand where they are coming from in their comment, as "ATM machine" doesn't make logical sense. However, I'm afraid that this is another misconception: the way that languages work actually has quite little to do with logic.)

    • This is not to say that telling people how to speak "correctly" is always a bad idea. In addition to conveying meaning, language is also used for many social functions. It is good to know the standardly accepted ways of saying or spelling something within a given context.

    • Speaking of spelling: writing systems are not languages. Writing systems are simply ways to record language and spelling is secondary to speaking and signing. This is similar to how an mp3 file is not music, just a carrier of it. All normal, healthy individuals acquire a language automatically if they grow up in an environment where they are in contact with the language. Writing, meanwhile, is a skill that must be taught.

    • Which reminds me: sign languages on the other hand are not somehow translating spoken languages into hand waving, and neither are they some sort of partial, simple languages. Sign languages are fully independent and fully complex languages. There isn't also just one global sign language, just like there isn't just one global spoken language. People around the world sign differently, just like they speak differently. As an example, American Sign Language is in fact way more different from British Sign Language than American English is from British English (the former pair are two different languages, the latter rather two dialects of a single language).

    • A language not having a word or an expression for something doesn't mean that people who speak it can't think about or understand that concept. Language can certainly influence thinking (the extent of which has been debated furiourly) but language is not thought, it is a method of communication.

    • Being able to speak just one language is not the norm and has probably never been. The majority of the world's population speaks multiple languages, of course to various degrees of competence. Monolingualism is an exception, and I would argue at least partially the result of our quite recent system of nation states.

    • But no, linguists don't speak a gazillion languages each. Just like doctors don't have all the diseases. Linguists just study how languages work. Speaking another language helps (just like having had chickenpox probably helps when sympathizing with your patient who has chickenpox) but it's not necessary.

    • All in all, human languages work in pretty fascinating ways. There are universal things that all languages seem to do, and there are things that vary widely between languages. The similarities actually greatly outnumber the differences. Meanwhile, no other animal seems to have a similar communicative skill that allows us to express an infinite number of things with a finite number of components. When the popular press talks about "bird language" or "dolphin speech" they don't really refer to language in the same way as linguistics do when they talk about human language.

    38 votes
  19. Comment on This week's album and EP releases in ~music

    vili Link Parent
    Thanks for the heads-up! I really like this one, and it's pretty much exactly how you described it. A great find.

    Thanks for the heads-up! I really like this one, and it's pretty much exactly how you described it. A great find.

    2 votes
  20. Comment on This week's album and EP releases in ~music

    vili Link
    I've been waiting for the new Donna Grantis album "Diamonds & Dynamite" for months now. And after my first listen, I must say that I'm not disappointed! In fact, I'm hugely impressed. It's...

    I've been waiting for the new Donna Grantis album "Diamonds & Dynamite" for months now. And after my first listen, I must say that I'm not disappointed! In fact, I'm hugely impressed.

    It's understandable if you just went "Donna who?". This is labelled as her first solo album, but strictly speaking it's neither her first nor really solo (it is an album, though!). Her first full release was "Suites" back in 2012 under the Donna Grantis Electric Band title. But what she's best known for, and how she also came to my attention, is for playing guitar in Prince's last band (2014-2016), the 3rdEyeGirl. They were a brilliant band live, and also put out one album, Plectrumelectrum. The title track to that album was actually written by Donna, not Prince.

    When I listen to "Diamonds & Dynamite" today, I hear a lot of Prince in it. In fact, if someone had handed these tracks to me and said that they are unreleased songs from Prince's fusion jazz experiments, say from the early 2000s, I would probably not question it one bit.

    But having said that, "Diamonds & Dynamite" is not a Prince-wannabe project. It is an album that very much has its own identity. Like I said, I'm hugely impressed by what Donna and her band (with a guest appearance from Pearl Jam's Mike McCready) have put together here. It is complex, it is groovy, and it is extremely competent.

    Anyway, thanks so much for this list! Once I've played this through a couple of more times, I'll dive into some of the others on your list. I actually keep checking new albums weekly from various sources, but it would be absolutely wonderful to have an authoritative weekly listing somewhere.

    Also, and please take this in the most unbullying way possible: your post labels Donna's album as "hard rock", but it really isn't. I would say it's a funky jazz-rock fusion album.

    3 votes