what's recent activity

  1. Comment on I'm trying to get a programming job without a degree. Got any tips? in ~comp

    what
    Link Parent
    I tried to emphasize my experience from projects on my resume, hopefully that's a good start to showing them what I can do. I'll make sure to work on a strong application letter and interview...

    I tried to emphasize my experience from projects on my resume, hopefully that's a good start to showing them what I can do. I'll make sure to work on a strong application letter and interview skills.

    Do you have any advice for looking for positions at smaller companies? Do you think I should keep searching on job boards, or should I try reaching out to some smaller shops directly?

    Thanks!

  2. Comment on I'm trying to get a programming job without a degree. Got any tips? in ~comp

    what
    Link Parent
    Thanks, that's very reassuring - even with some experience, I've had a lot of doubt about whether I could actually apply my skills to an actual job position, but knowing that I'll be able to have...

    Thanks, that's very reassuring - even with some experience, I've had a lot of doubt about whether I could actually apply my skills to an actual job position, but knowing that I'll be able to have support and ask questions makes me feel more confident.

    This is good advice - I'll make sure to aim to be a decent person to work with and fit in with company culture, and always be open to learning. Thanks again :)

    (I love your programming tip posts btw <3)

    2 votes
  3. Comment on I'm trying to get a programming job without a degree. Got any tips? in ~comp

    what
    Link Parent
    I tried to sign up for Triplebyte in the past, but I live in Canada, and I believe you have to be in the US (or willing to relocate) to continue with their process. I've heard of people being...

    I tried to sign up for Triplebyte in the past, but I live in Canada, and I believe you have to be in the US (or willing to relocate) to continue with their process. I've heard of people being fairly successful with it, but from what I know they do those trivia-style interviews that require knowledge in things that aren't really used in practice.

    1 vote
  4. Comment on I'm trying to get a programming job without a degree. Got any tips? in ~comp

    what
    Link Parent
    Thanks, this gives me a more confidence that my skills are good enough to do the job. I'll keep in mind the soft skills and proving that I can work in the environment the job asks for. Also thanks...

    Thanks, this gives me a more confidence that my skills are good enough to do the job. I'll keep in mind the soft skills and proving that I can work in the environment the job asks for.

    Also thanks for the tip @umbrae, I applied for a position at Wave, it seems like a nice company to work for.

    (mentioning @somewaffles and @45930 so they see this)

    3 votes
  5. Comment on I'm trying to get a programming job without a degree. Got any tips? in ~comp

    what
    Link Parent
    Thanks, that's good advice! I just added tests, CI, and a Travis badge to the Django app. The rest are desktop and mobile apps, so it would be a bit more involved, but I'll try to add tests for...

    Thanks, that's good advice! I just added tests, CI, and a Travis badge to the Django app. The rest are desktop and mobile apps, so it would be a bit more involved, but I'll try to add tests for them at some point.

    3 votes
  6. Comment on I'm trying to get a programming job without a degree. Got any tips? in ~comp

    what
    Link Parent
    I think I kept it that way cause the projects are still ongoing, but it does look off, I'll use past tense for all of them. Thanks!

    I think I kept it that way cause the projects are still ongoing, but it does look off, I'll use past tense for all of them.

    Thanks!

    1 vote
  7. I'm trying to get a programming job without a degree. Got any tips?

    Hey ~, I'm just out of high school and I want to get a programming job. I don't have a degree (I may go to college, but if I do it'll be in a few months), and little work experience. Do you have...

    Hey ~, I'm just out of high school and I want to get a programming job. I don't have a degree (I may go to college, but if I do it'll be in a few months), and little work experience. Do you have any tips that could help me have a successful job search?

    Here's my resume (somewhat anonymized, but most info is on my Github anyways). I tried to focus on experience I've gained from creating open-source projects to show the skills that I have. I've made sure that all the projects listed have demos, screenshots, usage instructions, etc. Any advice on how I could improve it would be appreciated.

    Thanks!

    22 votes
  8. Comment on Ghost Data - Celestial Bodies in ~music

    what
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    I love the lyrics in this song, I find they flow really well. Lyrics Why don't you take apart these precious bones? Mend my heart, reap what you sow Feel the burn from in this dream, We break...

    I love the lyrics in this song, I find they flow really well.

    Lyrics Why don't you take apart these precious bones? Mend my heart, reap what you sow Feel the burn from in this dream, We break apart ripped from the seam

    Can't describe just what I feel,
    Break the chains and help me heal,
    Celestial Bodies fly overhead,
    With countless words I'm ripped to shreds

    Searching through the universe
    The skyscrapers and day lovers take part in what's real,
    You make me feel like I could die happy in this moment of our lives

    The stars are endlessly, procreating, we'll fall asleep

    Why don't you take apart these precious bones?
    Mend my heart, reap what you sow
    Feel the burn from in this dream,
    We break apart ripped from the seam

    Can't describe just what I feel,
    Break the chains and help me heal,
    Celestial Bodies fly overhead,
    With countless words I'm ripped to shreds

    Still my lips, let's take it slow
    Wield my hips, don't let me go
    Falling miles so endlessly,
    You lift me up so easily,

    Lay your head upon my breast,
    For a moment cleanse all the stress

    Relive a moment eternally,
    Within my temple so yearningly

    You make me feel like I could die
    Happy in this moment, of our lives
    You make me feel like I could die
    Happy in this moment, of our own lives

    Why don't you take apart these precious bones?
    Mend my heart, reap what you sow
    Feel the burn from in this dream,
    We break apart ripped from the seam

    Can't describe just what I feel,
    Break the chains and help me heal,
    Celestial Bodies fly overhead,
    With countless words I'm ripped to shreds

    Still my lips, let's take it slow
    Wield my hips, don't let me go
    Falling miles so endlessly,
    You lift me up so easily,

    Lay your head upon my breast,
    For a moment cleanse all the stress

    Relive a moment eternally,
    Within my temple so yearningly

  9. Comment on First release of my native Markdown notes app, Notementum (v0.1.0) in ~tech

    what
    Link Parent
    Thanks! I have a pretty long list of features to add and bugs to fix, but I think I’ll try to sort out Windows support sooner rather than later.

    Thanks! I have a pretty long list of features to add and bugs to fix, but I think I’ll try to sort out Windows support sooner rather than later.

    2 votes
  10. Comment on StandardJS, a Javacript linter config with 3 million downloads/month starts showing advertisements in users terminals in ~comp

    what
    Link Parent
    One thing that astounded me was when I came across a Github profile with hundreds (maybe over a thousand!) NPM packages, each one just a few simple lines of code, often depending on the author’s...

    Talk about resume-padding and PR-driven development

    One thing that astounded me was when I came across a Github profile with hundreds (maybe over a thousand!) NPM packages, each one just a few simple lines of code, often depending on the author’s other small packages, creating insane dependency chains. I can only assume this kind of thing is done to pad portfolios. All you need is for one large package to depend on something of yours, and before you know it, the dependency chain downloads dozens or hundreds of your miniscule packages.

    5 votes
  11. Comment on Love Magic by Ujico*/Snail's House in ~music

    what
    Link
    Thanks for sharing this, from the first 10 seconds I knew I would enjoy it :) I love Snail’s House’s usual more chill music, and I absolutely love the more lively, glitchy songs.

    Thanks for sharing this, from the first 10 seconds I knew I would enjoy it :)

    I love Snail’s House’s usual more chill music, and I absolutely love the more lively, glitchy songs.

    1 vote
  12. First release of my native Markdown notes app, Notementum (v0.1.0)

    Screenshot I posted a few days ago about a notes app I was working on called Notementum, and I'm happy to show you the first release (0.1.0). Installation instructions are available on the Github...

    Screenshot

    I posted a few days ago about a notes app I was working on called Notementum, and I'm happy to show you the first release (0.1.0). Installation instructions are available on the Github repo: https://github.com/IvanFon/notementum

    There's still lots of things I'd like to add, both big and small, and definitely a few bugs here and there, but I've been going for too long without sharing it, and I find it's best to release as early as you can to start getting feedback, and perfect it later.

    One things that's missing is documentation. I'd like to start on this soon, but I'm probably not going to share this anywhere other than Tildes just yet, so this comment will do for now :)

    Right now, the app only runs on Linux. I'd like to add Windows support, and it almost works, the problem is that WebKit2Gtk, the embedded web view I use to show note previews, doesn't support Windows. I'm going to explore some other options in the future, whether that's figuring out how to compile it, or allowing other preview methods (user's web browser, PDF, etc.).

    The app is also very much in alpha, so you shouldn't use this for anything important, there may be bugs that can cause you to lose some of your data. If you do use this for anything, make sure you backup your notes database.

    If you want to use it, here's a wall of text on usage:

    Usage

    The notes database is located at ~/.notes.db. When you launch the app, it'll load it, or automatically create it if it doesn't exist. I'd eventually like to allow choosing different locations, but it's hard coded for now.

    The interface is fairly simple. The leftmost sidebar displays a list of notebooks, and the "middlebar" displays a list of notes. Selecting a notebook will display the notes within it in the notes list. Selecting a note will open it in the editor, which is to the right.

    To create a new note, press Escape to focus on the searchbar above the notes list, and start typing a title. If no existing notes are found, press enter, and a note will be created with the title you entered.

    To rename a note, double-click on it in the notes list.

    The editor has a toolbar with 4 buttons, from left-to-right:

    • Toggle between editor and preview (shortcut: Ctrl+E)
    • Assign the current note's notebook
    • Add an attachment
    • Delete the current note

    The green circle all the way to the right turns into a loading indicator when you have unsaved changes. Once you stop typing for a few seconds, your changes will be saved, and it'll switch back into a green circle.

    Notebooks

    Notebooks aren't created directly, they're based on what notebooks your notes are assigned to. This means that, to create a notebook, assign it to a note. To delete a notebook, just delete all the notes contained within it, or assign them to a different notebook.

    Clicking on the notebook toolbar button brings up this dialog. To create a new notebook, double click on <New notebook> and type in a name.

    Attachments

    The notes database also stores attachments. This means that the entirety your notes can be contained in your database. Clicking on the attachment toolbar button brings up this dialog. The toolbar allows you to upload an attachment or delete it respectively. Pressing Insert Selected will insert the image at your cursor in the editor (![](image.png)).

    Theme

    The screenshots show the app with my desktop Gtk theme, Arc Dark. On your desktop, it'll use whatever your theme is. It should look good with any Gtk theme, but at some point I may bundle Arc Dark with it.

    The note preview currently has it's colours hard coded to look good with Arc Dark, so it may look a bit off on other themes. I'll try to sort that out at some point.

    Planned features
    • load/save database to/from different path
    • Windows support
    • note exports
    • database encryption
    • changing syntax highlighting theme
    • note tags
    • full-text search
    • proper documentation
    • more keyboard shortcuts
    • integrated sync
      • although you should already be able to use Git, Synthing, Dropbox, etc.
    • Vim mode for editor
      • maybe somehow embed a terminal to allow using vim/emacs/whatever
    Boring technical stuff

    The app was made with Python and Gtk+ 3. I've done this before and I really enjoy the development experience, especially with Glade to design the interface. There are still some Gtk features that I should really be using to make things simpler (GtkApplication, actions, and accelerators) that I'll be adding later.

    The database uses sqlite 3. This is convenient, as it allows for storing everything in one file, and will make fast searches easier in the future. Attachments are stored as base64 directly in the database. This makes it easy to have all your notes be contained entirely in the one database, but I may have to think about a more efficient method in the future.

    Markdown rendering is done using mistletoe, which has been great to use. Syntax highlighting and MathJax renderers were already available, so it was just a matter of combining both and adding custom image loading from the database, which was very easy. Mistletoe has a very easy to use API, so this was no problem.

    For LaTeX math rendering, I'm using MathJax. It supports pretty much everything, which is nice, but it can take a while to load. I'm currently loading it from a CDN in a <script> tag, so I'm hoping once I load it from a local file it'll be a bit faster. If not, I may have to find another solution.

    Like I said, the app still has a few bugs that need to be fixed. If you find any problems, it would be great if you could leave a comment here or open a Github issue (or if you have any feature requests).

    21 votes
  13. Comment on StandardJS, a Javacript linter config with 3 million downloads/month starts showing advertisements in users terminals in ~comp

    what
    Link
    Taken from this Reddit thread, thought this could be an interesting discussion. My previous comment was done hastily, but now that I have some time, a few thoughts I'd like to note: From the top...

    Taken from this Reddit thread, thought this could be an interesting discussion.

    My previous comment was done hastily, but now that I have some time, a few thoughts I'd like to note:

    • From the top Reddit thread comment:
      • The website is misleading. The name "Standard" can give off the false impression that the project is official or endorsed by Javascript in some way, when it isn't.
      • This is nothing more than a config file for ESLint, a popular open-source Javascript linter. None of the advertising revenue from Standard is going upstream to ESLint, or any projects in the dependency chain.
    • Speaking of this being just an ESLint config, the author has a separate repo which contains the actual config file (eslintrc.json). So, when the value of Standard is this 200 line JSON config file... why is all the "cruft" around it needed, and why did it take 5 days (and $2000) to release a new version?
      • This Github comment shows that Standard depends on 233 packages by 125 contributors, of which none of the funding is going to.
    • This comment in particular made a great point:

    What I'm most pissed about is that I need those logs to do my damn job. This isn't like a billboard on a highway -- this is like if a surgeon had to close a pop-up every time she wanted to pick up her scalpel. I don't want to waste time filtering ads when I'm trying to debug.

    With the current nature of the Javascript/NPM ecosystem, it won't be long before build logs are filled with "Use code left-pad for 1 month of NordVPN for $5.99!" As someone who was really into Javascript a while ago, and now has been using pretty much just Python, Go, and C++ for a few months, it seems absurd to me. I will admit, Javascript has some nice tooling, but when you're pulling in hundreds (or thousands!) of dependencies, of which you only explicitly depend on a dozen, you have to think about how fragile this all is. More and more critical web infrastructure is being built on the Javascript ecosystem and you have to wonder how well-audited all this code is, and if it's even possible for anyone who isn't a megacorp with the funds to dedicate the needed developer time.

    13 votes
  14. Comment on What are your favourite episodes of 99% Invisible? in ~talk

    what
    Link Parent
    I’m glad you’re enjoying it, this podcast does a great job making some more mundane or obscure things interesting. I was first introduced to it from a podcast thread I made around a year ago (wow,...

    I’m glad you’re enjoying it, this podcast does a great job making some more mundane or obscure things interesting.

    I was first introduced to it from a podcast thread I made around a year ago (wow, it doesn’t seem like that long!), there are tons of other great podcast recommendations there.

    By the way, thanks for providing all the links :)

    2 votes
  15. Comment on What are your favourite episodes of 99% Invisible? in ~talk

    what
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    Before I listened to it, I didn’t think Curb Cuts sounded like anything special, but it ended up being surprisingly enjoyable, and became one of my favourite episodes! I think I’ll check out The...

    Before I listened to it, I didn’t think Curb Cuts sounded like anything special, but it ended up being surprisingly enjoyable, and became one of my favourite episodes!

    I think I’ll check out The Revolutionary Post tonight, it looks really interesting from a quick skim of the article.

    2 votes
  16. Comment on What are your favourite episodes of 99% Invisible? in ~talk

    what
    Link
    So far I've really enjoyed The Accidental Room (332), The Automat (356), and Curb Cuts (308).

    So far I've really enjoyed The Accidental Room (332), The Automat (356), and Curb Cuts (308).

    2 votes
  17. What are your favourite episodes of 99% Invisible?

    99% Invisible is a podcast about "the unnoticed architecture and design that shape our world". Episodes from other podcasts that have a similar theme are always welcome. Edit: moved my favourites...

    99% Invisible is a podcast about "the unnoticed architecture and design that shape our world". Episodes from other podcasts that have a similar theme are always welcome.

    Edit: moved my favourites to a comment.

    13 votes
  18. Comment on What are you coding today? in ~comp

    what
    Link Parent
    Good to be back :) Python is always nice to work with, and it has great libraries, it's been a pleasure using it for desktop apps. Gtk+ vs Qt is a topic that gets debated pretty often. I'd say at...

    Good to be back :)

    Python is always nice to work with, and it has great libraries, it's been a pleasure using it for desktop apps.

    Gtk+ vs Qt is a topic that gets debated pretty often. I'd say at this point Qt has "won", it's more popular, it seems like the majority of new projects use it, and quite a few existing projects have switched to it from Gtk. I'll probably use it at some point in the future, or maybe port something to it, but I'm quite happy with Gtk for now. I think it looks good, has pretty good documentation, and the UI designer (Glade) is very nice to use. I've used it before so I'm inclined to stick with it, but I should probably try Qt more in the future.

    Qt just published a blog post about Qt and Python, it's clear that they're putting a lot of work into it: Technical vision for Qt for Python

    5 votes