wirelyre's recent activity

  1. Comment on What does analog have that digital doesn't? in ~talk

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    I think it's probably related to older keyboard designs. Modern pianos are very resonant and sustain notes for a long time; on older instruments the effect is more subtle (aside from the...

    It's one of those things which probably wasn't intentional

    I think it's probably related to older keyboard designs. Modern pianos are very resonant and sustain notes for a long time; on older instruments the effect is more subtle (aside from the sustaining).

    Many pianos have a center "sostenuto" pedal, which sustains only the notes currently pressed.

    Do more modern electric pianos attempt to simulate these sympathetic vibrations?

    Their marketing materials say that they do! :-)

    Apparently some fancy ones try to simulate each string individually. I haven't played any of those in person, but I've heard virtual (MIDI) instruments that do something similar, and it's very convincing.

    The biggest difference for me playing electronic pianos is in the key touch. The force through different heights on a piano key is nonlinear, and it's quite distinctive. I know that recent electronic keyboards have more accurate mechanisms than just levers but I haven't tried one in a while.

    3 votes
  2. Comment on PAC-MAN 99 - Announcement trailer - Nintendo Switch in ~games

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    Seems to be a theme with these retros royals. IIRC the details of Tetris 99's garbage and game speed mechanics were determined through frame-by-frame analysis.

    Seems to be a theme with these retros royals. IIRC the details of Tetris 99's garbage and game speed mechanics were determined through frame-by-frame analysis.

  3. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    Very cool! Is the Roman alphabet already in the ROM or will you need to draw your own?

    Very cool! Is the Roman alphabet already in the ROM or will you need to draw your own?

    2 votes
  4. Comment on The revolution in classic Tetris - A younger generation is utilizing the internet to master the NES game in months, surpassing milestones that previously took decades in ~games

    wirelyre
    Link
    I wonder if retro games naturally produce healthier communities. There's a filter right away when the community grows from nothing, since it's mostly people coming back to a game for nostalgia...

    I wonder if retro games naturally produce healthier communities.

    There's a filter right away when the community grows from nothing, since it's mostly people coming back to a game for nostalgia rather than competition. The initial draw isn't that strong, so if the community isn't pleasant and constructive, people will just leave and it'll fizzle. The tone is kind of naturally selected from the start.

    5 votes
  5. Comment on Fortnightly Programming Q&A Thread in ~comp

    wirelyre
    Link
    Does anyone know of a good introduction / overview of LL parsers and table construction? I've got a library nearby, so I can go get a textbook if it has pictures, but I don't want to wade through...

    Does anyone know of a good introduction / overview of LL parsers and table construction?

    I've got a library nearby, so I can go get a textbook if it has pictures, but I don't want to wade through pages and pages of Greek letters and follow sets to get the intuition. I already did that with LR.

    2 votes
  6. Comment on Fortnightly Programming Q&A Thread in ~comp

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    That's odd. Does the same thing happen if you slice f to be smaller? Is gz.read_to_string definitely std::io::Read::read_to_string? Does gz have more bytes available after the read_to_string call?...

    That's odd.

    Does the same thing happen if you slice f to be smaller?

    Is gz.read_to_string definitely std::io::Read::read_to_string?

    Does gz have more bytes available after the read_to_string call?

    Is the GzDecoder returning some io::ErrorKind early in its decoding?

    let mut gz = GzDecoder::new(&f[..1024]);
    
    Read::read_to_string(&mut gz, &mut s);
    
    2 votes
  7. Comment on The plus-size knitters who are solving an inclusivity problem in ~hobbies

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    I'm disappointed by this comment thread. @eve, thank you for bringing your experience here. You clarified the relationship between knitters and designers for me, which I hadn't ever thought about....
    • Exemplary

    I'm disappointed by this comment thread.

    @eve, thank you for bringing your experience here. You clarified the relationship between knitters and designers for me, which I hadn't ever thought about. And it's good to know exactly how much the communities do or don't value size inclusivity. I certainly wouldn't know.

    Folks, we don't have to immediately problematize everything. This article is about a first step in fixing something that's obviously wrong. The whole point is that change is beginning. We get to celebrate that. We don't need to criticize baby steps.

    But now poor @eve is stuck defending the very concept of automatic tailoring?! Like she's automatically part of The System because she liked the article? This work is the cutting edge. You are witnessing the beginning of changes in the online knitting community. These same creators will be the ones figuring out the details brought up in this thread.

    I don't think anyone was writing in bad faith. But come on — talking about details like this automatically pits @eve against the ideas. Which is super uncomfortable because she just wanted to celebrate a small success. Also, she's not opposed to the ideas!

    Here's what I wanted to see from this thread: "Oh, cool, inclusivity meets yarn. Wait, I thought of some extra stuff they'll need to think about in the future." This way we all support the movement as trying to change the community, instead of somehow trying to fix the movement itself.

    Again, disappointing.

    4 votes
  8. Comment on What is a class in Python? in ~comp

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    According to this article, even single-digit (single-word) CPython integers use 28 bytes (plus the reference pointer). In true single-kinded languages like Python, I think it's simpler to think of...

    According to this article, even single-digit (single-word) CPython integers use 28 bytes (plus the reference pointer).

    In true single-kinded languages like Python, I think it's simpler to think of integers etc. as "immutable" rather than "pass-by-value".

  9. Comment on Version 2 of Google’s Flutter toolkit adds support for desktop and web apps in ~comp

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    Okay, that's comforting — I only remember trying out the canvas renderer. Maybe the sky hasn't fallen yet.

    Okay, that's comforting — I only remember trying out the canvas renderer.

    Maybe the sky hasn't fallen yet.

    1 vote
  10. Comment on Does anyone have, or has had, an addiction to music? in ~music

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    Sometimes, and I swear this is real, I like to challenge my sensibilities. I put on headphones, turn on several different pieces of classical music at once, maybe with some nature noises too, and...

    Sometimes, and I swear this is real, I like to challenge my sensibilities. I put on headphones, turn on several different pieces of classical music at once, maybe with some nature noises too, and just sit back and try to experience the chaos as music. It has groove, it has direction, it has narrative. The parts interact sometimes.

    So like, this would be considered some real avant-garde BS if you did it in a performance. But it's not — it's just for me. :-)

    1 vote
  11. Comment on Does anyone have, or has had, an addiction to music? in ~music

    wirelyre
    Link
    I want to look at this differently. It sounds like you don't want to change anything about the music you listen to, right? That's not the problem. You want to establish a different relationship...

    I want to look at this differently.

    It sounds like you don't want to change anything about the music you listen to, right? That's not the problem.

    You want to establish a different relationship between you and music. You want to hear and treat it differently.

    You already know there's music you can like. I think that experience is still accessible to you, it's just challenging to find right now.

    I'd encourage you to really think about and change the way you consume music. Trying to reframe it as the experience of listening, rather than about the piece of music as an object that you can study.

    I wouldn't suggest you go cold turkey — actually I would judge that unhealthy. But maybe you could go on a diet. You might try setting a time in the evening for two songs, and only two. Cut out other music from your day, just that time in the evening. Sit differently from how you normally do, maybe put on some nice shoes, and try to let only the sound walk you along. Not thinking about lyrics, or history of the performers, or whatever: just the gentle pull of beats and harmony, however you experience those things.

    Man, I hope this comment is somehow useful to you. Sounds like you're in a tough spot.

    4 votes
  12. Comment on Version 2 of Google’s Flutter toolkit adds support for desktop and web apps in ~comp

    wirelyre
    Link
    Oh no. My experience has been exactly the opposite: Flutter's canvas rendering is very slow, and it feels totally unlike the native UI. I'd much rather have my browser dealing with text, rather...

    On the web platform, specifically, Sneath noted that the team deliberately started out with a very standard, DOM-centric approach. But while that worked fine, it also meant performance was held back by that, especially for more advanced features. Over the course of the last year or so, the team started working on what it calls Canvas Kit. This WebAssembly-based project takes the same Skia graphics engine that powers Android and Chrome itself and makes it available to web apps.

    Oh no. My experience has been exactly the opposite: Flutter's canvas rendering is very slow, and it feels totally unlike the native UI. I'd much rather have my browser dealing with text, rather than relying on every single web app to manually implement copy–paste.

    And this replaces all HTML elements with a single canvas. Not only is the code driving a web app impossible for users to read, now the entire display layer is hidden too!

    This stabilization seems terrible for the open web. :-(

    8 votes
  13. Comment on Does anyone have, or has had, an addiction to music? in ~music

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    One of the most satisfying experiences for me is listening to something that I really "shouldn't" like, given my current tastes, and being able to say "oh, yeah, I get it."

    One of the most satisfying experiences for me is listening to something that I really "shouldn't" like, given my current tastes, and being able to say "oh, yeah, I get it."

    4 votes
  14. Comment on Let's talk about computer algebra systems in ~comp

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    My experience is that Mathematica is best in class for most algebra. For FOSS alternatives SageMath is probably the best bet. I don't need a CAS all that often, but it has been flexible and...

    My experience is that Mathematica is best in class for most algebra.

    For FOSS alternatives SageMath is probably the best bet. I don't need a CAS all that often, but it has been flexible and powerful enough for everything I've tried. The packages are very well integrated.

    I strongly recommend Sage.

    This isn't an answer to the OP question, but related: Pluto.jl is a very nice reactive notebook for Julia.

    2 votes
  15. Comment on Why type systems matter for UX: an example in ~comp

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    Wow, thanks! I'm not familiar with the CLIM but I'll definitely play with it and look through the code. I noticed the same thing about the ribbon. :-)

    Wow, thanks! I'm not familiar with the CLIM but I'll definitely play with it and look through the code.

    I noticed the same thing about the ribbon. :-)

    2 votes
  16. Comment on Why type systems matter for UX: an example in ~comp

    wirelyre
    Link Parent
    I don't think "appliances" and "the end of apps" conflict with each other. When I'm reading this earlier article I think more about the Acme text editor or a Smalltalk system, where it looks like...

    I don't think "appliances" and "the end of apps" conflict with each other.

    When I'm reading this earlier article I think more about the Acme text editor or a Smalltalk system, where it looks like you have an appliance, but the parts work by themselves too.

    I think the reason Alfred-alikes haven't caught on is exactly as Chiusano describes: individual resources and actions are so tightly bound within applications that a meta-program can't make a user significantly more productive, even by using multiple interfaces at once. The resources exposed are simply too coarse.

    And regarding REPLs, I think there's still a lot to improve. IDEs have panes and menus, and "quick action" boxes or whatever they're called are an extra modal interface. So pure text input per se isn't even the dominant interface model for sophisticated work.

    1 vote
  17. Comment on Why type systems matter for UX: an example in ~comp

    wirelyre
    Link
    I'm realizing I probably actually wanted to post his previous article because it's more accurate and creative, though long.

    I'm realizing I probably actually wanted to post his previous article because it's more accurate and creative, though long.

    4 votes