8 votes

A reality where CSS and JavaScript don't exist...?

4 comments

  1. [3]
    mrnd
    Link
    Without CSS, browsers probably would have better default styling for content. For example, Gemini clients often have much more imaginative default looks, which is possible because the content...

    Bradley’s current design is a great example of what his web utopia would look like, and I think it’s just a step too far. It can easily be “fixed” but without CSS, how would we do that?

    Without CSS, browsers probably would have better default styling for content.

    For example, Gemini clients often have much more imaginative default looks, which is possible because the content author has less control over the presentation.

    I think ignoring this prevents making an honest argument for CSS.

    8 votes
    1. Apos
      Link Parent
      On my Kobo ereader, that's one thing I like. I pick the font that I like, it's size, the spacing. Some books for some reason don't obey my chosen settings though :(.

      On my Kobo ereader, that's one thing I like. I pick the font that I like, it's size, the spacing. Some books for some reason don't obey my chosen settings though :(.

      4 votes
    2. vord
      Link Parent
      This author's page, when rendered in a half-width browser window at 1080p, is barely wider than my cellphone screen. If I wanted to read like that I'd just use my phone. Bradley's page extends to...

      This author's page, when rendered in a half-width browser window at 1080p, is barely wider than my cellphone screen. If I wanted to read like that I'd just use my phone.

      Bradley's page extends to the whole width of my browser window. I want the vast majority of my computing experience to be in my preferred color scheme (Solarized Dark). The current state of CSS and the web make that impossible.

      1 vote
  2. Wes
    Link
    I can agree with these views. You always see the CSS or JS purists that claim any amount is too much (usually on that orange website). But a bit of design or functionality sprinkled in can make a...

    I can agree with these views. You always see the CSS or JS purists that claim any amount is too much (usually on that orange website). But a bit of design or functionality sprinkled in can make a big difference in some cases.

    Still, moderation is key. I do a lot of performance work for clients and often make recommendations to remove various site features. Every feature has a cost, and all those DNS lookups, data payloads and CSS recalculations will add up. Does your site really need a weather widget? Is there a faster way to embed that Youtube video? (Yes)

    For the first time in a long time, pages are actually getting faster. This is likely due to Google making speed a larger factor in their rankings back in July. It's a trend I hope to see continuing.

    I'm sitting at 18.2KB on my blog homepage now. Any takers for a 25KB Club?

    4 votes