petrichor's recent activity

  1. Comment on Scientists now think that being overweight can protect your health in ~health

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    Aside from diet, what are some aspects of Europe that encourage being healthy more than the United States?

    Aside from diet, what are some aspects of Europe that encourage being healthy more than the United States?

    1 vote
  2. Comment on Scientists now think that being overweight can protect your health in ~health

    petrichor
    Link
    It's important to note that this is looking at people who already have heart disease or other conditions: not being overweight or obese is incredibly important to prevent these in the first place....

    It's important to note that this is looking at people who already have heart disease or other conditions: not being overweight or obese is incredibly important to prevent these in the first place. Still perplexing regardless - maybe being overweight gives the body more resources to fight off its (mostly self-inflicted, although burns and pneumonia are on there) problems?

    9 votes
  3. Comment on Amazon’s mission: Getting a ‘key’ to your apartment building in ~tech

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    For more expensive packages, requiring someone to be home and sign for it is pretty common too.

    For more expensive packages, requiring someone to be home and sign for it is pretty common too.

    3 votes
  4. Comment on I am fighting back by switching this website from HTML to PDF in ~comp

    petrichor
    Link
    So I'm not a big fan of PDFs, for the reasons already laid out by users in this thread (primarily their size and inability to reflow - two points which the author believes are solved, but...

    So I'm not a big fan of PDFs, for the reasons already laid out by users in this thread (primarily their size and inability to reflow - two points which the author believes are solved, but certainly don't appear that way to me).

    The author's nicely-outlined main points are interesting, though. They can really be split into two groups: things PDFs do better than HTML (the first three) and why PDFs aren't worse than HTML (despite, kinda being worse - the latter six). Those first three seem very closely related:

    • PDFs are self-contained and offlineable.
    • PDFs are files.
    • PDFs are decentralized.

    It seems like one of the author's bigger concerns (outside of spec complexity and tracking, which are ever-pervasive) is that saving a webpage doesn't really save a webpage. In my mind, this is better solved by using an extension like SingleFile and lobbying browsers to change their default "save" behavior than taking the drastic jump to running a website on PDFs - but I'm still glad to see this, it's fun to see people trying new things with the open web.

    Latter six
    • PDFs are discoverable.
    • PDFs are independent of browsers – but can still be read easily by most browsers.
    • PDFs and a PDF tool ecosystem exist today.
    • PDF is an open standard.
    • PDFs are part of the web.
    • PDFs are page-oriented. [not comparable to HTML - although it certainly can be with print queries - but also a downside in my book]
    3 votes
  5. Comment on I am fighting back by switching this website from HTML to PDF in ~comp

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    ...and today I learned that Word works in the web browser.

    ...and today I learned that Word works in the web browser.

  6. Comment on I am fighting back by switching this website from HTML to PDF in ~comp

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    Out of curiosity, do you use Reader View? If so, does it work well for you?

    Out of curiosity, do you use Reader View? If so, does it work well for you?

    2 votes
  7. Comment on I am fighting back by switching this website from HTML to PDF in ~comp

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    That first PDF took fourty-five seconds to load.

    That first PDF took fourty-five seconds to load.

    7 votes
  8. Comment on A remarkable silence: Media blackout after key witness against Assange admits lying in ~news

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    You do not need to have gone to school for journalism to be a journalist. Trying to discredit the primary reporter of some of the most important events in the twenty-first century, and who has won...

    You do not need to have gone to school for journalism to be a journalist. Trying to discredit the primary reporter of some of the most important events in the twenty-first century, and who has won multiple journalistic awards while doing it, is a shoddy excuse for trying to morally vindicate the violation of Assange's First Amendment rights.

    This article sums it up in a harsh but accurate manner.

    All of the evidence for what I was referencing is in the article of this post, which I though was readily apparant, but maybe not. I can quote the specific parts of the article if need be.

    5 votes
  9. Comment on Amazon asked Apple to remove an app that spots fake reviews, and Apple agreed in ~tech

    petrichor
    Link
    I've always wondered: at Amazon's current scale, do they have any incentive to crack down on fake reviews? It seems the status quo is working pretty well for them. Maybe if they were a smaller...

    I've always wondered: at Amazon's current scale, do they have any incentive to crack down on fake reviews? It seems the status quo is working pretty well for them. Maybe if they were a smaller seller in a market with more competition, unreliable reviews might matter. But most people I know don't use Amazon for the reviews; they use it for the convenience.

    3 votes
  10. Comment on A remarkable silence: Media blackout after key witness against Assange admits lying in ~news

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    This is a worrying stance to have. The media has proven itself (throughout history, and particularly contemporary history) to be an often-critical counterweight to broken judicial systems. Julian...

    We will see in court what evidence there is, and what evidence there is not. The prosecution will present their side of the story in the courtrooms, not in the press.

    This is a worrying stance to have. The media has proven itself (throughout history, and particularly contemporary history) to be an often-critical counterweight to broken judicial systems.

    Western media built Assange up to be something he clearly is not. The story is not about a journalist being railroaded by US authorities, but about a hacker on the run trying to avoid his day in court. That's important for how the story is covered.

    Julian Assange is a journalist, not a hacker. That the evidence supposing him as the latter was revealed to be fabricated for a witness's immunity is the main point of this article. Assange is also certainly not on the run - he is rotting in a British prison, while the United States takes its sweet time constructing evidence against him.

    As we wait for the prosecution's actual evidence, we're at a stage where twists and turns for a discredited hacker is only newsworthy to those deeply engaged with the story. When there are newsworthy developments in this case as it stands now, it'll get the coverage it deserves.

    That's certainly some faith in mass media. The key witness of the case against Assange, revealed to be a perpetual liar and fraudster, has now also been revealed to have made up the basis of the case against Assange. That's not a newsworthy development?


    Again, regardless of any of this, that the United States can claim that a journalist is a "hacker" and set out to arrest him, that American and allied media shies away from covering anything to do with evidence of foul play, and that so many countries around the world have been shown to be politically overpowered by the US in this case sets terrible precedents for a country that once valued journalistic freedom so highly.

    5 votes
  11. Comment on A remarkable silence: Media blackout after key witness against Assange admits lying in ~news

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    I disagree entirely with every sentence above.

    I disagree entirely with every sentence above.

  12. Comment on Its still rough, but I made a really busy tildes theme in ~tildes

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    Practically identical! I ended up settling on border-width: 0 5px 8px 5px; for a more equilateral-ish triangle.

    Practically identical! I ended up settling on border-width: 0 5px 8px 5px; for a more equilateral-ish triangle.

    2 votes
  13. Comment on Its still rough, but I made a really busy tildes theme in ~tildes

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    I second @tomf, making a HN theme is very straightforward and fun. A quick tip wrt. fiddly buttons: try replacing the vote arrows with CSS triangles.

    I second @tomf, making a HN theme is very straightforward and fun. A quick tip wrt. fiddly buttons: try replacing the vote arrows with CSS triangles.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on Steam Deck - Valve's Switch-style portable gaming PC, starting at $399 USD and shipping in December 2021 in ~games

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    I wonder if it can run yuzu.

    I wonder if it can run yuzu.

    4 votes
  15. Comment on Steam Deck - Valve's Switch-style portable gaming PC, starting at $399 USD and shipping in December 2021 in ~games

    petrichor
    (edited )
    Link
    Wow, this looks interesting. If only I didn't own a Switch... Boring Linux thoughts The choice of Arch Linux for the operating system was a little surprising at first. You don't see it used often...

    Wow, this looks interesting. If only I didn't own a Switch...

    Boring Linux thoughts

    The choice of Arch Linux for the operating system was a little surprising at first. You don't see it used often (or ever, really?) outside of servers or personal computers - and certainly not in consumer products. After some thought, though, it makes sense:

    • Arch Linux's package management is leaps and bounds above Debian and derivatives
    • Arch has been remarkably stable, even more so than Debian, since about 2015
    • While Proton is great, it's far from "done" - Valve is going to be doing major development over the course of the Steam Deck's life and having up-to-date packages (which is difficult to do with Debian) is a necessity

    Some questions I have:

    • Why the weird screen size? Why not 1080p?
    • Why did they ship with a touchscreen? Such a small number of games benefit from that, and it has to be a battery suck, right?
    • What's the dock going to look like?
    • What's performance going to look like? It has wildly impressive stats - but how will those be impacted by thermals?
    • How is it for games outside of Steam? Could software like Cemu or yuzu potentially run?

    Absolutely waiting for reviews, but this looks like the best gaming platform for the price point out there. It smokes the Switch, and seems likely to be competitive with the latest Microsoft/Sony consoles from the looks of the specs. I'd be surprised if it doesn't wind up being a hit.

    6 votes
  16. Comment on Steam Deck - Valve's Switch-style portable gaming PC, starting at $399 USD and shipping in December 2021 in ~games

    petrichor
    Link Parent
    What are the downsides of eMMC memory?

    What are the downsides of eMMC memory?

    4 votes
  17. Comment on Hashing Phone Numbers For 2-Factor Authentication in ~comp

    petrichor
    Link
    Do note that phone numbers are the worst form of 2-factor security, and should be avoided whenever possible. Sim swapping attacks are very easy to pull off and not just restricted to...

    Do note that phone numbers are the worst form of 2-factor security, and should be avoided whenever possible.

    Sim swapping attacks are very easy to pull off and not just restricted to "high-profile" people.

    7 votes