21 votes

What's the coronavirus like where you are?

I figured we were overdue for another one of these threads. Here are all the previous ones:

February 2020
March 2020
September 2020

What are things like in your corner of the world?

15 comments

  1. mrbig
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    Brazil is a total and utter disaster. The president is an anti-democratic, militaristic, homophobe, fascist psychopath that wants people to resume normal business while the death toll grows every...

    Brazil is a total and utter disaster. The president is an anti-democratic, militaristic, homophobe, fascist psychopath that wants people to resume normal business while the death toll grows every day. The only reason he didn't stage a coup yet was pure incompetence. Only 17% of Brazilians received their first vaccine shot, and 8% for the second. In sum, we're still fucked.

    15 votes
  2. Deimos
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    Pretty much the worst it's ever been here in Alberta, Canada. We're just starting to come down from our worst peak, surpassing the previous one in December. About the only positive this time is...

    Pretty much the worst it's ever been here in Alberta, Canada. We're just starting to come down from our worst peak, surpassing the previous one in December. About the only positive this time is that the cases in older people were much lower because they've mostly been vaccinated. Lots more charts of different aspects here, if anyone's interested.

    My wife and I are scheduled for our first vaccine dose on Thursday, but at this point it's sounding like we probably won't get our second one until about 4 months later.

    13 votes
  3. Amarok
    (edited )
    Link
    My second shot is tomorrow at 5pm. We've been around 10-15 cases a day reported in the county for over a month, which isn't bad. Everything is open, masks are mandatory, it's still chilly weather...

    My second shot is tomorrow at 5pm. We've been around 10-15 cases a day reported in the county for over a month, which isn't bad. Everything is open, masks are mandatory, it's still chilly weather (even snowed briefly yesterday). We're at >60% of people in the county having had at least one shot of the vaccine, pleasantly higher than I was expecting. There are a dozen places to get vaccinated within a 15 minute drive of where I am. Apparently, at any events such as sports games or big concerts there will be a free vaccination clinic on premises. Hoping that people will impulsively get their shots.

    In other news, everyone's property taxes around here are going up 6% to cover the covid damage. I await the school taxes with baited breath. :P

    Edit: Second Pfizer shot delivered. This one didn't even make my arm sore yet. We'll see how I'm feeling in a day or two.

    Edit2: Arm feeling a bit lame/sore on day two, I was dead tired and had a mild, strange headache that would come and go all day. By day three, I'm feeling great, no problems, no symptoms, no side effects.

    13 votes
  4. [2]
    guywithhair
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    Eastern United States, urban area. Things are starting to feel more relaxed. I was vaccinated (J&J) a few weeks into April. Most people I know have had at least one shot, and we're starting to...

    Eastern United States, urban area. Things are starting to feel more relaxed. I was vaccinated (J&J) a few weeks into April. Most people I know have had at least one shot, and we're starting to talk about emerging from work-from-home, which I'm looking forward to as someone who lives alone and moved here mid-pandemic. Summer is looking bright, and hopefully the vaccines are effective enough to keep us from going back into isolation due to some new variant. If so, then I'm expecting things to feel fairly normal around here by the Fall.

    13 votes
    1. suspended
      Link Parent
      Variants shouldn't be a concern based on what I've read about it. Outdoor activities should be fairly safe. The air is more dense/humid during summer which makes the spread of mouth droplets very...

      Summer is looking bright, and hopefully the vaccines are effective enough to keep us from going back into isolation due to some new variant.

      Variants shouldn't be a concern based on what I've read about it. Outdoor activities should be fairly safe. The air is more dense/humid during summer which makes the spread of mouth droplets very difficult.

      To be safe, you may want to check out the new CDC recommendations here: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/fully-vaccinated-guidance.html

      11 votes
  5. grahamiam
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    Taiwan has continued to be successful in almost completely keeping the virus locked out, but in the past two weeks a handful of people associated with an airline and a quarantine hotel were...

    Taiwan has continued to be successful in almost completely keeping the virus locked out, but in the past two weeks a handful of people associated with an airline and a quarantine hotel were infected, and yesterday it was announced they found five cases with an unclear origin, so that might be about to change quickly.

    Taiwan only has AZ atm and people do not want it. The uptake was so low on the initial signups that they opened it up to everyone, including noncitizens, so I got my first shot last week. We're supposedly getting Moderna in two months and everyone is waiting for that, due to slightly higher efficacy and slightly lower chance of side effects. I'm curious if people will change their mind with this cluster.

    12 votes
  6. teaearlgraycold
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    Bay Area, California: Counties around here have around 60% of people at least partially vaccinated. My guess is we may actually hit the 85% threshold for herd immunity some time in the summer...

    Bay Area, California: Counties around here have around 60% of people at least partially vaccinated. My guess is we may actually hit the 85% threshold for herd immunity some time in the summer since children will be able to get the vaccine. On June 15th the governor is opening up every category of business in at least some capacity - that means movie theaters and amusement parks can operate at 1/4 capacity (masks still required).

    Personally, I'll be fully vaccinated in a couple of weeks. I don't really have very diverse social requirements, so that means life is basically back to normal for me.

    12 votes
  7. [2]
    3_3_2_LA
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    Not currently in India but damn, 7 people (friends, relatives, acquaintances) I know died last week and the hopelessness just feels like a miasma at this point... I'm concerned about my family...

    Not currently in India but damn, 7 people (friends, relatives, acquaintances) I know died last week and the hopelessness just feels like a miasma at this point... I'm concerned about my family there but unable to do anything, and unfortunately, they weren't able to get vaccinated because of the vaccine shortage. I really wanna fly back home just to see with my own eyes that my folks are safe but I have other obligations here :(

    12 votes
    1. kfwyre
      Link Parent
      I’m so sorry. My heart goes out to you and your family.

      I’m so sorry. My heart goes out to you and your family.

      6 votes
  8. Protected
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    Portugal was worst in the world at the end of January after a massive wave that started after christmas. After two and a half months of highly restrictive lockdown measures that ended in early...

    Portugal was worst in the world at the end of January after a massive wave that started after christmas. After two and a half months of highly restrictive lockdown measures that ended in early April we were back to summer 2020 levels with sporadic but minor outbreaks here and there. Vaccination has been slow in europe due to well-known reasons but we're at ~30% first dose, ~10% second dose (mainly elderly, high risk jobs and the like). Trust in vaccines is high here. The mood is relaxed, which might cause people to behave irresponsibly, hopefully not.

    8 votes
  9. suspended
    Link
    Our family lives in a remote area in the northeast US where we spend most of our time in the outdoors. Thus, the pandemic did not effect us as negatively as most people. Our two boys have been...

    Our family lives in a remote area in the northeast US where we spend most of our time in the outdoors. Thus, the pandemic did not effect us as negatively as most people. Our two boys have been doing remote learning since March 2020 which put a little bit of added stress upon me as a stay-at-home dad. However, I've gotten so used to the company that I'm going to have to deal with an onslaught of loneliness when they head back to school in the fall.

    6 votes
  10. notauser
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    Here in Singapore, our daily Covid cases have remained in the double-digits. However, there are still some new clusters appearing, such as the one in Tan Teck Seng Hospital, and more recently...

    Here in Singapore, our daily Covid cases have remained in the double-digits. However, there are still some new clusters appearing, such as the one in Tan Teck Seng Hospital, and more recently Changi Airport. Because of this, we're increasing the restrictions again - for example, gyms are closed, and businesses are encouraged to go back to full work-from-home.

    In terms of vaccinations, I believe the rate has slown down a bit due to low supply, although I haven't checked the figures since a couple of days ago. However, given our low cases, it's fair to say we're a pretty low priority right now. In addition, more age groups have been opened up for vaccine eligibility, so I'm guessing that supply is improving.

    6 votes
  11. Greg
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    Surprisingly good now, here in the UK. Over the course of the pandemic our per capita death rate has been incredibly bad, lockdowns were too soft and too late which then necessitated longer and...

    Surprisingly good now, here in the UK.

    Over the course of the pandemic our per capita death rate has been incredibly bad, lockdowns were too soft and too late which then necessitated longer and harsher measures when the damage became impossible to ignore, and the government actively incentivised social contact after the second set of restrictions ended last summer, with predictable results.

    All that said, though, the restrictions they put in around Christmas were sensible (albeit chaotic and contradictory for a few weeks), the majority of workers have been supported with 80% of their normal pay for over a year, and the vaccination program has been managed extremely well.

    Our death rates are now in the single digits, and 70% of the adult population have had at least one vaccine dose. I'm faintly frustrated that they've just decided not to offer AstraZeneca to the under-40s because of an infinitesimally small blood clot risk - I was expecting our age bracket to be called up this week, and now it looks like it'll be another two before we get our first dose - but having that be a problem at all is obviously a luxury.

    I'm slightly envious of Americans who have, after a similarly terrible start, been able to get vaccinated at will for a month or two, but in global terms I feel extremely fortunate to be where we are now. What I won't do, ever, is forgive the fact that tens of thousands were lost last year purely to government incompetence. Nor will I forget the blatant, transparent corruption we've seen in the distribution of emergency contracts for inferior medical supplies at hugely inflated prices.

    It's an odd place to be. I feel incredibly fortunate that things are better now, and I absolutely feel for those in countries who aren't past the worst - I work closely with a lot of people in India and their stories have been heartbreaking. I can't put aside my anger at the mismanagement of the last year, but it feels almost ungrateful to be complaining about that when others are still at risk. Right now, I should probably just count my blessings and keep waiting for that vaccine.

    6 votes
  12. jzimbel
    (edited )
    Link
    Massachusetts had its first day with 0 reported deaths since the start of the pandemic yesterday! Cases are plummeting in general; positive test rate is staying low which implies continued...

    Massachusetts had its first day with 0 reported deaths since the start of the pandemic yesterday!

    Cases are plummeting in general; positive test rate is staying low which implies continued widespread testing and the potential to start containing the remaining clusters out of existence soon. 44% of the population is fully vaccinated; counting those who have caught and recovered from the virus we’re likely at over 50% immunity.

    Almost all of my friends and family have had at least their first shot, and I’ve been at full efficacy for a few weeks now. The outdoor mask mandate has been relaxed and people are slowly adjusting to it*. For me, it makes biking around much more pleasant since my glasses don’t fog up every time I stop at an intersection.

    I’ve also started taking buses and trains again instead of biking everywhere, and it’s so nice being able to do other things like reading while in transit.

    Also, Boston is simply beautiful in the springtime. I think everyone here is extra thankful for it this year.

    Yesterday’s daily charts of the situation in /r/boston

    * Also, some are continuing to wear masks outdoors because they really help with spring allergies

    4 votes
  13. ras
    Link
    Here in the Georgia (the US state, not the country) we're looking like this: Georgia - May 11 Cases (last 2 weeks): 11,017 Cases per 100k (last 2 weeks): 102 Cases (total): 887,443 Cases per 100k...

    Here in the Georgia (the US state, not the country) we're looking like this:

    Georgia - May 11
    Cases (last 2 weeks): 11,017
    Cases per 100k (last 2 weeks): 102
    Cases (total): 887,443
    Cases per 100k (total): 8,192
    Population: 10,833,472

    In the west Atlanta exurbs where I live things are almost normal. However, being that this is deep Trump Country, things have been relatively 'normal' the whole time. As soon as restaurants and bars were allowed to open here they were open and packed. Mask wearing is hit or miss. Anecdotally I see a lot more masking in Target and Publix than in Walmart (where it's non-existent for the most part). I've been back working at my office since I got vaccinated. My company has around 50 people and I'd say 85% of them have had COVID. I worked remotely for most of the last year, but I was definitely in the minority. It's sad but I think down here most people just quickly accepted the fact that X number of people were going to die and that's just how it was going to be.

    3 votes