18 votes

In what small ways are you considerate towards others?

I haven't been able to get samfundssind out of my head since reading the article. It's the polar opposite of what you see in a lot of the US, and I wish that more people in this country weren't selfish assholes. It blows my mind that people are unwilling to make such small personal sacrifices, like wearing a mask, for the benefit of their neighbors.

On that note, what are some small, self-imposed inconveniences you put up with to improve the lives of others?

I'll start: if I'm pulling up to a red light in the right-most lane and there's a car behind me, I'll always move over to the left. There's a chance they want to make a right turn, and there's no need for them to wait behind me for the light to cycle.

13 comments

  1. mrbig
    (edited )
    Link
    There are many homeless in my area. When I walk past them at night they’re usually sleeping. I make total silence. If I’m with people, I quietly alert them to do the same.

    There are many homeless in my area. When I walk past them at night they’re usually sleeping. I make total silence. If I’m with people, I quietly alert them to do the same.

    12 votes
  2. suspended
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    This may seem larger than 'small' to some. However, it remains a very niche area within the humanities field. I have been actively engaged, on the Internet, to bring academic Biblical scholarship...

    This may seem larger than 'small' to some. However, it remains a very niche area within the humanities field.

    I have been actively engaged, on the Internet, to bring academic Biblical scholarship from the 'ivory towers' to the lay folk.

    10 votes
  3. [2]
    Atvelonis
    (edited )
    Link
    Peter Singer's 1971 essay "Famine, Affluence, and Morality" gave me the moral stimulus to begin donating to charity. Right now I donate about 8% of my annual income to a few humanitarian,...

    Peter Singer's 1971 essay "Famine, Affluence, and Morality" gave me the moral stimulus to begin donating to charity. Right now I donate about 8% of my annual income to a few humanitarian, educational, and social justice-oriented groups. Eventually, per Singer's thesis, I'd like to increase that number to nearly my entire disposable income. I try not to be stingy in general, especially with friends. I prefer not to talk about this because it sounds incredibly self-aggrandizing, but I honestly don't know how else I can make up for the unequal lot in life I've been given. What is a relatively trivial amount of money for me (in the grand scheme of things) can literally mean the difference between life and death for many people around the world.

    7 votes
    1. thundergolfer
      Link Parent
      Feel the same, but Singer himself say people need to talk about their donating so that it normalises altruism. Right now what's normalised is a hideously immoral amount of wealth inequality where...

      I prefer not to talk about this because it sounds incredibly self-aggrandizing

      Feel the same, but Singer himself say people need to talk about their donating so that it normalises altruism.

      Right now what's normalised is a hideously immoral amount of wealth inequality where most don't bat an eye at people spending 1000s on handbags and vacations while children die of easily preventable disease.

      2 votes
  4. asoftbird
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    Not small but l try to share things with people that need it more than l do. Since the quarantine a few friends are unemployed so l send them a couple of hundred $ monthly. I can miss it, so yeah....

    Not small but l try to share things with people that need it more than l do. Since the quarantine a few friends are unemployed so l send them a couple of hundred $ monthly. I can miss it, so yeah.

    Otherwise, making space for people when shopping/driving. Helping people if possible/required.

    5 votes
  5. [4]
    Pistos
    Link
    I was going to say this for myself, too. A slight variation: if I pull up to a red and the lane is wider than usual (a one-and-a-half lane, we might call it), I'll pull up way over to the left,...

    if I'm pulling up to a red light in the right-most lane and there's a car behind me, I'll always move over to the left. There's a chance they want to make a right turn, and there's no need for them to wait behind me for the light to cycle.

    I was going to say this for myself, too. A slight variation: if I pull up to a red and the lane is wider than usual (a one-and-a-half lane, we might call it), I'll pull up way over to the left, with the driver's side tires almost on the paint of the lane division. It's the same courtesy as you describe, except pre-emptive.

    Another thing I do with service workers (cashiers, wait staff, customer service reps on phone, front desk attendants, etc.) is try to maintain a calm demeanour. I know they probably get their fair share of angry or difficult customers or end users, so I especially try to be the full opposite of that, so that their day isn't as bad. If I'm on the phone, and they say "sorry, our computer system is slow today", I reassure them that it's no problem, that I work with computers all the time, and I totally understand, and I tell them it's not their fault, and I try to just make small talk in the meantime. Basically help them feel at ease, and help them know that I'm not getting impatient.

    5 votes
    1. [3]
      acdw
      Link Parent
      This is so important to me -- I do the same. It's not the employee's fault that their systems or whatever doesn't work. I used to do this for political aides too, when I called my representatives...

      Another thing I do with service workers (cashiers, wait staff, customer service reps on phone, front desk attendants, etc.) is try to maintain a calm demeanour

      This is so important to me -- I do the same. It's not the employee's fault that their systems or whatever doesn't work. I used to do this for political aides too, when I called my representatives -- though any more it's getting harder and harder to do. I feel like they're complicit at this point

      2 votes
      1. [2]
        kfwyre
        Link Parent
        Ditto for service workers. My first job was in a grocery store, and I needed the kind patience of dozens to smooth out the negative impact from even one aggressive customer.

        Ditto for service workers. My first job was in a grocery store, and I needed the kind patience of dozens to smooth out the negative impact from even one aggressive customer.

        2 votes
        1. acdw
          Link Parent
          Shoot, I know it! For me, a frustrated patron -- who isn't even frustrated at me, just the situation -- can mess up my whole evening. (Of course, that's something I need to work on, hah!) But yes....

          Shoot, I know it! For me, a frustrated patron -- who isn't even frustrated at me, just the situation -- can mess up my whole evening. (Of course, that's something I need to work on, hah!) But yes. We're all in this life together; I don't understand people who don't think about their impacts on others.

          2 votes
  6. Parliament
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    I always tip well for service industry purchases even if it's a take out order or easy request (e.g. cracking open a beer), and I always tell people helping me to have a great rest of their...

    I always tip well for service industry purchases even if it's a take out order or easy request (e.g. cracking open a beer), and I always tell people helping me to have a great rest of their day/night/weekend in a way that shows I do mean it. My family is okay financially because my wife and I are both in state-licensed professions, but people in the service industry in the US commonly work off tips without employer-provided healthcare coverage. And they often have to deal with inconsiderate customers face-to-face throughout the day when I can handle the rare bad client from behind a computer screen or telephone.

    4 votes
  7. krg
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    Standard decent-human-being-stuff, really. Y'know, general politeness... I'm more reactive than proactive, in general, so I'm not one to rush to aid. But I'll help whenever I'm asked (provided the...

    Standard decent-human-being-stuff, really. Y'know, general politeness...

    I'm more reactive than proactive, in general, so I'm not one to rush to aid. But I'll help whenever I'm asked (provided the level of help is within my ability).

    Oh. I pride myself on my ability to checkout efficiently, for the sake of everyone else in line.

    2 votes
  8. Tygrak
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    I guess nothing really. Well nothing I wouldn't consider ordinary. I guess I might be more efficient and no bullshit when dealing with service workers and stuff - I am pretty anxious when dealing...

    I guess nothing really. Well nothing I wouldn't consider ordinary. I guess I might be more efficient and no bullshit when dealing with service workers and stuff - I am pretty anxious when dealing with service workers and people in the public in general. So whenever I have to interact with people in the public in anyway I have everything I need from them fully prepared and rehearsed. I just try to avoid any friction in these interactions, I try to make them as easy for both parties as possible. Also, when in public transport I never ever do things that might annoy others, again because I really don't want to avoid any confrontation - for example when I am on a crowded bus, tram or train I never take a seat, just in case someone needs it they don't have to ask.

    On the other hand, when a stranger approaches me in the city asking for something, I ignore them, walk past them pretending I didn't understand or hear them. Or when someone tries to hand me some leaflet, or wants to get my signature for a petition, anything like that, I ignore them. I know they are just doing their job, but I am sorry. So I am kind of an asshole in that way.

    2 votes
  9. helloworld
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    Most times, I am not. That makes me not a nice person , but over years I have learned that I don't exactly mesh well with people. So, for as much as possible, I keep a distance, and try not to...

    Most times, I am not. That makes me not a nice person , but over years I have learned that I don't exactly mesh well with people.

    So, for as much as possible, I keep a distance, and try not to disturb others. It is not healthy, and a close friend knows that. He's always trying to keep me up and about, and I appreciate that. But even then, I understand he has a life, and try not to add my misery into his.

    That's what I can, so that's what I do to be considerate towards other people.

    2 votes