7 votes

Feature suggestion: One-to-many user thread format

This may seem like I'm rambling but, please bare with me, I think I have some point(s) to make.

  • I've been trying to locate a common ancestor image to the album cover of Gnarls Barkley's single Crazy and the banner of an interesting talk titled Imagination and it's resistance to chance. I think the resemblance is sufficient to suggest one an ancestor exists and it's not just a crazy coincidence. Can anyone help identify it?

  • The same academic conference linked above hosts a fascinating introduction to Intensionality, Invariance, and Univalence. It captures some of the most exciting mathematics going on at the moment. Presumably I should be posting this in ~science tagged as mathematics. Is there some limit at which particular tags become popular enough to warrant their own subtilde? Are there queries users can run to determine tag counts? These questions were prompted by the slight irritating thought of classifying mathematics under science.

  • People could respond to many different parts of this thread since I've written so much. However, the points are slightly related, at least in how I present them. If I were to split them up into separate posts, not only would it add to the noise, each point would lose whatever relation they had. So, I wonder if, much like r/IAMA, could there be a better format for conversations where many users are speaking to a particular individual? An expert or celebrity perhaps. Trying to track all the replies of the main user was always a hassle in those IAMA threads.

If there's interest in such an extension to tildes, I'd like to offer my help in implementing it. That's my main point really and why I posted here.

15 comments

  1. [4]
    reese
    Link
    Your example of the "problem" seems a bit contrived, and I say that not to bring you down, but because we already have the solution: thematically distinct comments and topics. It's up to users to...

    People could respond to many different parts of this thread since I've written so much. However, the points are slightly related, at least in how I present them. If I were to split them up into separate posts, not only would it add to the noise, each point would lose whatever relation they had.

    Your example of the "problem" seems a bit contrived, and I say that not to bring you down, but because we already have the solution: thematically distinct comments and topics. It's up to users to exercise communication skills, organizing and presenting their thoughts in a coherent manner. I'm pretty sure the feature you're suggesting would ultimately come down to discrete identifiers with references to one another as structured data, but right now there's unstructured data potentially amenable to what you're trying to do.

    Elaborating on what I mean by that, if there's a loose relationship between two topics or comments, we can already use links. There's a guarantee that Tildes supports bidirectional relationships simply by editing and adding links to a comment at a later time, assuming a semi-related one was already submitted and they belong to separate topics. This is not a structurally-enforced deal, in terms of a database—I'm just talking about blobs that happen to have hyperlinks in them.

    You know, it's quite possible I'm misinterpreting your suggestion. What would help me and probably others understand it is a more concrete example. If you could draft up a visual prototype of what you want, in CodePen or Microsoft Paint for all I care, you may entice the skeptical among us. One thing I think anyone can appreciate is that you've offered to help implement your suggestion, which is a kindness rarely afforded in open source software. That's very considerate. I know this to be true since I thanklessly maintain shit on GitHub, but I have not contributed code to Tildes.

    Is there some limit at which particular tags become popular enough to warrant their own subtilde? Are there queries users can run to determine tag counts? These questions were prompted by the slight irritating thought of classifying mathematics under science.

    As I understand the running philosophy, I think the measure of popularity is kind of subjective. The tag just needs to be popular and regular enough before it warrants its own tilde (group) or subtilde, I guess (?). For running queries on tag counts, there's not a public API for explicitly doing things like that yet if I understand correctly, although it looks like GraphQL was decided upon as the go-forward architecture, which pleases me greatly. It'll probably have most of the queries you could possibly want, and if it doesn't just ask.

    5 votes
    1. [3]
      ShroudedMouse
      Link Parent
      My example does seem contrived and yet I swear it was a very natural chain of thought to me. I don't think sites like tildes or reddit are designed for these loosely related networks of posts by a...

      My example does seem contrived and yet I swear it was a very natural chain of thought to me. I don't think sites like tildes or reddit are designed for these loosely related networks of posts by a single user. That's more twitter and medium's domain. However, I think being able to host that sort of single-user conversation format across multiple topics would strengthen the tilde communities. Most of what I'm thinking of now could be done with custom user tags and tag filtering.

      You're right, next step would be to get some visual demo. Maybe I'm trying to solve something that's not a problem. Wouldn't be the first time. I'll think about it. Thanks for such a considerate reply.

      3 votes
      1. [2]
        reese
        Link Parent
        You're welcome. I may not need visuals—I think I understand what you're saying now. You want personal tweet-like shouts into the void that can be responded to with comments or DMs? I like that,...

        You're welcome. I may not need visuals—I think I understand what you're saying now. You want personal tweet-like shouts into the void that can be responded to with comments or DMs? I like that, actually. I find conversations on Twitter horrendously unintuitive to follow. I can't tell who's responding to whom in a given chain. What's more, everything's character-limited.

        Relatively recently there was discussion here about using Tildes for blogging started by @skybrian, where @Deimos mentioned that ~blog could be a worthy experiment. He also entertained the idea of having topics with multiple links, and perhaps series of topics. Upon further consideration, I think your feature suggestion has major overlap with that. Now, if you agree, keep in mind that the supreme leader did have this to say:

        Tildes is a "subject-centric" site. Other sites like Twitter are "user-centric". There's a spectrum between the two extremes, but it's probably hard to do both well, and it can add complexity for future updates if you always have to try to keep both styles in mind and make sure everything will work for both.

        5 votes
        1. ShroudedMouse
          Link Parent
          Yes. This is exactly the difference I'm getting at. Some submissions are user-centric - the poster often sticks around to answer questions and the subject is secondary to their views on it. Other...

          Yes. This is exactly the difference I'm getting at. Some submissions are user-centric - the poster often sticks around to answer questions and the subject is secondary to their views on it. Other submissions are subject-centric where the poster is largely irrelevant. I think all social media gets these two types of submissions regardless of what they're designed for. The ~blog idea is great. I was thinking of some way to differentiate the two submission types, partially automatic, partially by user tags, and present them differently. How? I still don't know. :)

          1 vote
  2. skybrian
    Link
    Current best practice is to post mostly-unrelated stuff as separate topics, use tags, and if some subject becomes popular enough then @Deimos will make a subtopic for it. You could cross-link if...

    Current best practice is to post mostly-unrelated stuff as separate topics, use tags, and if some subject becomes popular enough then @Deimos will make a subtopic for it. You could cross-link if it seems important.

    As an alternative, if your post has different parts that are related, then you could post a single top-level topic and then post each part as a top-level comment. The order won't be right unless you change the sort order, but that's the best we can do for now.

    3 votes
  3. [3]
    wirelyre
    Link
    Thanks for the univalence lecture. Maybe I'll be able to make it past the second chapter of the Homotopy Type Theory book. I keep wishing I had more background in algebraic topology (and algebraic...

    Thanks for the univalence lecture. Maybe I'll be able to make it past the second chapter of the Homotopy Type Theory book.

    I keep wishing I had more background in algebraic topology (and algebraic geometry). It's hard to find material to learn with, and it's hard to figure out what I don't know until, often, halfway through a textbook.

    1 vote
    1. [2]
      ShroudedMouse
      Link Parent
      I've been struggling with the Homotopy Type Theory book too. I found it helped to step back and learn some more type theory and category theory first. The book's beautifully written but maybe...

      I've been struggling with the Homotopy Type Theory book too. I found it helped to step back and learn some more type theory and category theory first. The book's beautifully written but maybe lacking in examples for a beginner. Same could be said about many mathematics texts.

      1 vote
      1. wirelyre
        Link Parent
        Yeah, I did the same thing. Now I'm pretty much research-literate in intuitionistic type theory and some even more exotic typing systems. But category theory texts inevitably get to toposes and...

        Yeah, I did the same thing. Now I'm pretty much research-literate in intuitionistic type theory and some even more exotic typing systems. But category theory texts inevitably get to toposes and fibrations and then I feel stuck again. There's just so much that I'm sure would become clear from a few examples, maybe linking back to analysis, but I haven't found any usable video lectures yet.

        1 vote
  4. [7]
    joplin
    Link
    How do you know they share a common ancestor and one is not the ancestor of the other? Given the popularity of the song, which is from 2009, my guess would be the lecture from 2019 borrowed the...

    I think the resemblance is sufficient to suggest one an ancestor exists and it's not just a crazy coincidence. Can anyone help identify it?

    How do you know they share a common ancestor and one is not the ancestor of the other? Given the popularity of the song, which is from 2009, my guess would be the lecture from 2019 borrowed the artwork from the album. But that's just a guess.

    1 vote
    1. [6]
      ShroudedMouse
      Link Parent
      It could be that simple. I'm curious nonetheless. I tried tineye but that doesn't really work since they're not just photoshopped versions of each other.

      It could be that simple. I'm curious nonetheless. I tried tineye but that doesn't really work since they're not just photoshopped versions of each other.

      2 votes
      1. [4]
        tomf
        Link Parent
        The artist for the Gnarls' single is Kam Tang, a UK illustrator. The concept is fairly common -- a lot like the old Threadless stuff back in the day... but in this case, it looks like the youtube...

        The artist for the Gnarls' single is Kam Tang, a UK illustrator.

        The concept is fairly common -- a lot like the old Threadless stuff back in the day... but in this case, it looks like the youtube channel copied it :)

        /cc @joplin

        2 votes
        1. [2]
          joplin
          Link Parent
          Very cool! Just curious - how did you find the artist? Were they credited somewhere?

          Very cool! Just curious - how did you find the artist? Were they credited somewhere?

          2 votes
          1. tomf
            Link Parent
            Yeah, they’re credited on the CD — so I checked it out on Discogs. :)

            Yeah, they’re credited on the CD — so I checked it out on Discogs. :)

            2 votes
        2. ShroudedMouse
          Link Parent
          I really like his style. Thanks for that.

          I really like his style. Thanks for that.

          1 vote
      2. DanBC
        Link Parent
        Tineye feels like it's for close copies only. Yandex image search is pretty good at finding "pictures that look like this other picture", so give it a try.

        Tineye feels like it's for close copies only.

        Yandex image search is pretty good at finding "pictures that look like this other picture", so give it a try.