ButteredToast's recent activity

  1. Comment on What's the matter with men? They’re floundering at school and in the workplace. Some conservatives blame a crisis of masculinity, but the problems—and their solutions—are far more complex. in ~life.men

    ButteredToast
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    It only applies to a particular class of work unfortunately, but I believe that since the pandemic, remote work has served as something as an in-between for desk-worker fathers. For many of these...

    It only applies to a particular class of work unfortunately, but I believe that since the pandemic, remote work has served as something as an in-between for desk-worker fathers.

    For many of these men, the time that’d previously been going into commuting, frivolous meetings, and other somewhat extraneous job functions has instead been going into parenting and household duties, giving them the opportunity to help fill those roles while remaining a breadwinner.

    It would not surprise me if over time, some percentage of this group eases out of their jobs into full-time domestic roles, working around the associated social stigmas in a sort of frog-boiling effect.

  2. Comment on Selling subversion in ~misc

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    “Banal” is a good descriptor of modern advertising. It doesn’t really have any opinion at all. On occasion I’ll pull up a YouTube compilation of 90s TV ads pulled from VHS recordings. It might...

    “Banal” is a good descriptor of modern advertising. It doesn’t really have any opinion at all.

    On occasion I’ll pull up a YouTube compilation of 90s TV ads pulled from VHS recordings. It might just be the tinted glasses of nostalgia at work, but to me the overwhelming tone they carry is considerably more optimistic and energizing than anything that airs today. It’s quite a contrast to modern ads.

    5 votes
  3. Comment on The DVD biz has circled the drain for years. In 2024, it goes down the tubes. in ~movies

    ButteredToast
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    I wouldn’t mind owning more physical media, but it takes up a lot of space. Blu-rays and CDs are certainly more svelte than the VHS tapes, LaserDiscs, and vinyl records that came before them sure,...

    I wouldn’t mind owning more physical media, but it takes up a lot of space. Blu-rays and CDs are certainly more svelte than the VHS tapes, LaserDiscs, and vinyl records that came before them sure, but they’re still large enough to make keeping a collection a nuisance.

    Ripping to files can help with this, though one still technically has to keep possession of source media to be legal. The capacities required to make ripping movies and shows at archival quality practical necessitates bulky, heavy, fragile HDDs too… cheap massive SSDs can’t come soon enough.

    1 vote
  4. Comment on Nintendo is suing the creators of popular Switch emulator Yuzu, saying their tech illegally circumvents Nintendo's software encryption and facilitates piracy in ~games

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    By streaming Yuzu from a much more powerful desktop PC to a Deck with Moonlight, you can have BotW/TotK running at 60/90FPS and patched with higher settings in a Switch-like form factor. This is a...

    By streaming Yuzu from a much more powerful desktop PC to a Deck with Moonlight, you can have BotW/TotK running at 60/90FPS and patched with higher settings in a Switch-like form factor.

    This is a markedly better experience than Switch native, despite the tiny bit of added latency. As a bonus, streaming with Moonlight takes very little power, so you can crank the TDP of the Deck down to minimum and get many hours of battery life with no heat or fan noise.

    I had been intending to do this myself but hadn’t gotten around to setting it up yet.

    7 votes
  5. Comment on Return to office policies do not improve company value, but do make employees miserable: Study in ~life

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    I would imagine that to some extent, negative impacts on career outcomes can be mitigated by taking advantage of the flexibility granted by working from home. Point in case, I’m using some of the...

    I would imagine that to some extent, negative impacts on career outcomes can be mitigated by taking advantage of the flexibility granted by working from home.

    Point in case, I’m using some of the time freed up to earn a degree and work toward setting up secondary revenue streams among other things. Prior to remote work this would’ve been much more impractical, at minimum cutting into sleep and reducing overall well-being.

    9 votes
  6. Comment on PSVR2 to add PC support in 2024 in ~games

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    Basically, there’s two main categories of VR headset right now: standalone and tethered. Standalone headsets are those like the Quest 2/3/Pro, which have an Android smartphone and a battery...

    Basically, there’s two main categories of VR headset right now: standalone and tethered.

    Standalone headsets are those like the Quest 2/3/Pro, which have an Android smartphone and a battery integrated so they can operate without being driven by a PC.

    Tethered are those like the Index and Bigscreen Beyond, which can’t do anything on their own and must be driven by a PC.

    While standalone headsets can act as PC headsets, this comes at a cost; where tethered headsets work more like a monitor and take a direct DisplayPort connection, standalone running in PC mode requires a level of indirection — even if you hook them up to a PC with a cable, they can’t take a display connection and instead must be fed a video stream. Encoding the video to send to the headset degrades quality and adds latency.

    In theory, the PSVR2 ought to be a pretty good PCVR experience because it’s got decent specs and is tethered, taking a direct DisplayPort connection via USB alt mode (the same tech that makes USB-C monitors work). If this turns out to be true, it could be a good budget-conscious alternative to the other tethered headsets which all cost more, especially since it does inside-out tracking and doesn’t need lighthouse trackers like the Index and Beyond do.

    We won’t know if it actually provides a good PCVR experience until we’ve seen it in action, though.

    4 votes
  7. Comment on PSVR2 to add PC support in 2024 in ~games

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    Might’ve just been ahead of its time, seeing the runaway success of the Switch and recent surge of gaming handhelds ranging from cheap ARM-based emulator boxes to full-featured PCs. Or perhaps it...

    Might’ve just been ahead of its time, seeing the runaway success of the Switch and recent surge of gaming handhelds ranging from cheap ARM-based emulator boxes to full-featured PCs. Or perhaps it just targeted the wrong segment of gamers, considering how Nintendo had no problems in this space at all in the same timeframe.

    Either way a new Sony standalone handheld would be interesting, especially if it comes with support for PS4 games, which should be reasonably doable with hardware similar to the Deck’s APU and Z1 Extreme.

    1 vote
  8. Comment on PSVR2 to add PC support in 2024 in ~games

    ButteredToast
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    If they maintain its current price point and add SteamVR compatibility, it’d be a somewhat compelling option for those who don’t care for PC VR playing second fiddle to the onboard functionality...

    If they maintain its current price point and add SteamVR compatibility, it’d be a somewhat compelling option for those who don’t care for PC VR playing second fiddle to the onboard functionality (as is the case with the Quests), with the other dedicated PC VR options costing much more.

    3 votes
  9. Comment on PSVR2 to add PC support in 2024 in ~games

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    This might happen if the beefy-GPU APUs found in the past couple gens of home consoles become more generally available, otherwise, the absolutely terrible price to performance ratio of current...

    This might happen if the beefy-GPU APUs found in the past couple gens of home consoles become more generally available, otherwise, the absolutely terrible price to performance ratio of current discrete GPUs is going make this impractical. Nobody is going to pay PC prices for what’s essentially a PC that can’t play PC games, as discrete GPU prices would necessitate. Much of the value proposition of current consoles lies in their (relative to PCs) low cost of entry.

    3 votes
  10. Comment on JavaScript bloat in 2024 in ~comp

    ButteredToast
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I disagree, browsers absolutely need an HTML recycler widget. There’s been many times over the years where I’ve encountered infinite scrolling lists that only use as much JS as is needed to fetch...

    I disagree, browsers absolutely need an HTML recycler widget. There’s been many times over the years where I’ve encountered infinite scrolling lists that only use as much JS as is needed to fetch a page of new data and dump it in the page where after a few pages jank starts to creep in as resource consumption rises, eventually getting to a point where there’s readily visible stutter and on mobile devices, other (usually more important) apps start getting pushed out of memory.

    Contrast this to e.g. NSTableView in AppKit, a recycling table view, which back in the early 2000s could scroll a list with virtually unlimited items smoothly on a sub-1ghz single core machine with 128MB of RAM. I want to see this kind of efficiency on the web (and so do many devs, judging by the number of recycler widget libraries that exist).

    As far as shared libraries goes, while I’m not opposed to the idea I’d much rather obviate the vast majority of third party libraries altogether. We’ve already seen this happen with jQuery, which thanks to improvements in JS has been reimplemented in ultra tiny “sugar” libraries that wrap standard JS with jQuery syntax. Those comfortable with plain JS syntax can forgo jQuery entirely.

    There’s no reason this shouldn’t happen with any sufficiently popular library. React for instance is popular enough that by now browsers should have provisions for its most broadly used features, allowing React to become much more lightweight (being built around those provisions, letting the browser do the heavy lifting) and allowing for those with relatively basic needs to skip importing React entirely.

    Repeat this cycle enough times and the heavy, dependency-fractal JS libraries we’re familiar with today will eventually go extinct with most libraries instead implementing smaller-scoped, less frequently needed, highly specific functions or being little more than sugar.

    3 votes
  11. Comment on JavaScript bloat in 2024 in ~comp

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    A robust standard library wouldn’t fix it all but would go a long way towards improving things. Not only does application code have to import libraries for a bunch of really basic things, but so...

    A robust standard library wouldn’t fix it all but would go a long way towards improving things.

    Not only does application code have to import libraries for a bunch of really basic things, but so do the dependencies of all of those libraries. As a result, where on other platforms most commonly used libraries only go 2-3 layers deep on subdependencies, JS libraries go many times deeper. That adds up to a lot of extra weight fast.

    The other half of the equation is lack of capable, styleable widgets/controls included with HTML. Basic things like popup menus have probably been reimplemented tens of thousands of times for no good reason, and things that are frequently used table stakes in desktop/mobile UI frameworks (such as a scrolling list that recycles its items for efficiency) are totally absent in the browser.

    So on top of making the JS stdlib more robust, browsers/HTML also need a much better selection of widgets out of the box so it’s not necessary to pull in third party libraries so often.

    7 votes
  12. Comment on Kagi Smallweb [a website where each visit shows a random indie/small website, e.g. personal blogs] in ~tech

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    That’s no doubt part of it, but these days there’s ways to run a blog or small site with little to no technical knowledge and it’s only getting easier. I suspect that a big factor is that...

    That’s no doubt part of it, but these days there’s ways to run a blog or small site with little to no technical knowledge and it’s only getting easier.

    I suspect that a big factor is that technically inclined people are considerably more likely to care about or see the value in having a small web presence. To the non-technical layman, there’s little to distinguish a page on the small web from a Facebook page or similar, especially if they’re one of the huge number of people who weren’t on the web prior to 2005-2010.

    3 votes
  13. Comment on How do you even find quality appliances anymore? in ~life.home_improvement

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    The Bosch dishwasher I own, which is a recent purchase, can be connected to wifi and controlled by an app but it’s purely optional. I’ve never connected it and it works fine. Same for my LG washer...

    The Bosch dishwasher I own, which is a recent purchase, can be connected to wifi and controlled by an app but it’s purely optional. I’ve never connected it and it works fine. Same for my LG washer + dryer and GE fridge (the last of which I find odd, because it’s not even a “smart” fridge… what functionality is an app going to add exactly?).

    So in case it makes appliance shopping easier in the future, mention of an app or app-enhanced features doesn’t necessarily indicate requirement to use the app or connect to WiFi.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on How do you even find quality appliances anymore? in ~life.home_improvement

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    FWIW, even as someone in the US, back when I was still renting I would’ve thought twice about a rental with no appliances. Wouldn’t have outright avoided such units, but they’d need to have some...

    FWIW, even as someone in the US, back when I was still renting I would’ve thought twice about a rental with no appliances.

    Wouldn’t have outright avoided such units, but they’d need to have some pretty significant pro’s to offset the need to buy (and when it comes time to move, lug around) my own appliances. When renting likelihood of needing to move for some reason or another is much higher which makes owning appliances unappealing, unless the tenant can work out a deal with the landlord to get a rent discount for leaving the appliances on the property or something.

    7 votes
  15. Comment on How do you even find quality appliances anymore? in ~life.home_improvement

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    Knocking on wood, but I have an LG washer and dryer I bought back in 2021 which I think I selected for delivery speed (lots of models were taking months to ship due to shortages), and they’ve both...

    Knocking on wood, but I have an LG washer and dryer I bought back in 2021 which I think I selected for delivery speed (lots of models were taking months to ship due to shortages), and they’ve both been fine for the past couple of years. Hope that continues.

    As for used appliances, I love the potential savings but don’t feel like gambling on bringing in pests, which feels like it’s unavoidable for both appliances and furniture.

    3 votes
  16. Comment on Why you should consider a smaller keyboard in ~comp

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    There’s a few keys I still find legends helpful for, but they’re mostly keys that aren’t found on 65% and smaller boards. I don’t really need them, but they can be a fun element in keycap design...

    There’s a few keys I still find legends helpful for, but they’re mostly keys that aren’t found on 65% and smaller boards. I don’t really need them, but they can be a fun element in keycap design when the designer has gone with something other than the usual top-left-aligned Helvetica. Some of favorite cap sets like biip’s MT3 Extended 2048 do this.

    1 vote
  17. Comment on Why you should consider a smaller keyboard in ~comp

    ButteredToast
    Link Parent
    I can switch pretty fluidly, particularly between controllers and pointing devices (for example, the difference between cursor acceleration curves across operating systems, which many are...

    I can switch pretty fluidly, particularly between controllers and pointing devices (for example, the difference between cursor acceleration curves across operating systems, which many are extremely sensitive to, barely exists for me), but keyboards can be frustrating because I’m often typing with a somewhat time-sensitive purpose and so for example hitting the pipe key several times when I’m intending to backspace can be very frustrating which can then create a mini-vicious-cycle because the frustration degrades my typing performance further.

    3 votes
  18. Comment on Why you should consider a smaller keyboard in ~comp

    ButteredToast
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    75% with HHKB layout (basically HHKB except with F-Key row) would be pretty interesting to me, but I’ve never seen that either. I have seen a few 75%/80%/TKL keyboards that support HHKB backspace...

    75% with HHKB layout (basically HHKB except with F-Key row) would be pretty interesting to me, but I’ve never seen that either.

    I have seen a few 75%/80%/TKL keyboards that support HHKB backspace positioning, though. The term to look for here is “split backspace”. It’s very rare on prebuilt boards but you can find it on enthusiast kits sometimes. One such 75% board I saw recently is the Archetype Evolv.

    1 vote
  19. Comment on Why you should consider a smaller keyboard in ~comp

    ButteredToast
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    I’ve been tempted to toy with splitting the spacebar into more keys, but what holds me back is how often I need to use keyboards integrated into laptops which sadly can’t be changed. I already get...

    I’ve been tempted to toy with splitting the spacebar into more keys, but what holds me back is how often I need to use keyboards integrated into laptops which sadly can’t be changed. I already get a bit annoyed that I can’t carry over all of the relatively minor differences of HHKB/Tsangan layout over to laptops, I can’t imagine how frustrating that effect would be after getting accustomed to split spacebar.

    On that note, I wish Framework would do more with the keyboard modules for its laptops. They represent massive opportunity for flexibility that normally isn’t possible with laptops but have yet to do much with it.

    3 votes
  20. Comment on Why you should consider a smaller keyboard in ~comp

    ButteredToast
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    An HHKB Pro 2 was my first foray into alternative-layout keyboards back in around 2015, and it hooked me pretty quickly too. Larger layouts are workable but I wish it were more common to use the...

    An HHKB Pro 2 was my first foray into alternative-layout keyboards back in around 2015, and it hooked me pretty quickly too.

    Larger layouts are workable but I wish it were more common to use the HHKB’s positioning of Backspace… the standard location for it is a bit of a stretch for such a frequently used key.

    2 votes