Turtle's recent activity

  1. Comment on Reclaiming Indian food from the white gaze in ~food

    Turtle
    Link Parent
    Maybe it's not 'the point' of the article, but the subtext was there, and that was what really irked me and what I was reacting to. So she's upset that: white people are eating ghee and "kitchari"...

    Maybe it's not 'the point' of the article, but the subtext was there, and that was what really irked me and what I was reacting to.

    It’s also jarring to see how the language around Indian food has changed over time, with new recipes branded as ayurvedic, vegan, and cleansing in order to seem more approachable. Ghee, which I grew up thinking was an indulgence, is now a superfood. Khichdi, one of my childhood comfort foods, has been co-opted as kitchari, the latest detox cleanse.

    This kind of language belongs to modern wellness culture, which has also made me distance myself from Indian traditions. I would love to learn yoga or meditation, but don’t feel like I have access to them anymore: It’s too painful to learn about my culture from people who can’t pronounce “namaste” (nuh-mus-teh) or “mantra” (mun-tra). “Namaste” is a word that no longer even belongs to us: I cringe when I hear it used in all sorts of inappropriate situations, like as a catchphrase to “namastay in bed.” Its loss echoes the one I felt my first year in New York, when I attended a Diwali puja (prayer service) only to feel sick to my stomach when I realized that I was the only brown person in the room. It’s traumatic to see your culture taken from you.

    So she's upset that:

    • white people are eating ghee and "kitchari"
    • white people have anglicized the pronunciation of "namaste" and "mantra" (almost like they're English speakers or something?)
    • white people using namaste in contexts different than the original
    • white people participating in her religion

    which sounds a lot like "whites adopting things from other cultures and changing them to match their preferences". Which is fine, right?

    3 votes
  2. Comment on The Chinese government is engaging in a widespread, systematic campaign of forced birth control and sterilization on Uighurs and other minorities in ~news

    Turtle
    Link Parent
    Well that does seem like grounds for questioning his credibility, doesn't it?

    Well that does seem like grounds for questioning his credibility, doesn't it?

    2 votes
  3. Comment on Reclaiming Indian food from the white gaze in ~food

    Turtle
    (edited )
    Link
    If we want to talk about cultural appropriation: it's chá, not "chai". And your not supposed to put milk or sweeteners in it. Time to reclaim tea from the brown gaze I guess... /s, obviously...

    If we want to talk about cultural appropriation: it's chá, not "chai". And your not supposed to put milk or sweeteners in it. Time to reclaim tea from the brown gaze I guess...

    /s, obviously

    Cultures adapt products from other cultures to match their preferences. This is completely natural, literally every culture does this. It's not "gentrification" or "colonialism" or whatever.

    5 votes
  4. Comment on Reddit releases their new content policy along with banning hundreds of subreddits, including /r/The_Donald and /r/ChapoTrapHouse in ~tech

    Turtle
    Link Parent
    I guess misogyny is fine then...

    I guess misogyny is fine then...

    4 votes
  5. Comment on Views of homosexuality around the world - The global divide persists, but a survey of 34 countries shows increasing acceptance in most of them over the past two decades in ~lgbt

    Turtle
    Link Parent
    Is the church that influential nowadays? I was under the impression that the Nordic countries were particularly secular compared to the rest of Europe.

    Is the church that influential nowadays? I was under the impression that the Nordic countries were particularly secular compared to the rest of Europe.

    4 votes
  6. Comment on Tilweaks: A user style I made to "clean up" Tildes' interface in ~tildes

    Turtle
    Link
    Just so you know, the logo does not appear on the Gruvbox Light theme.

    Just so you know, the logo does not appear on the Gruvbox Light theme.

    3 votes
  7. Comment on Would you give up flying to lower your environmental impact? in ~enviro

    Turtle
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I'm not saying you can't gain anything by traveling to another country, but in my experience most cultures are only different in very superficial ways (language, food, architecture, etc.),...

    I'm not saying you can't gain anything by traveling to another country, but in my experience most cultures are only different in very superficial ways (language, food, architecture, etc.), especially those that Americans tend to visit, i.e. Western Europe (not to mention how "Americanized" the world is nowadays). Even my grandparents from the ROC (back when that included mainland China) don't seem very different to me than your typical white person here. Also, it's not like your average tourist actually interacts with locals that much, as most vacations are spent checking off boxes on a travel guide. You'd probably gain more value spending time volunteering in Appalachia or some other poor rural area.

  8. Comment on Would you give up flying to lower your environmental impact? in ~enviro

    Turtle
    Link Parent
    I think visiting family is definitely a justified use of air travel. I'm more curious what people think about international flights (particularly trans-oceanic ones) for the purpose of...

    I think visiting family is definitely a justified use of air travel. I'm more curious what people think about international flights (particularly trans-oceanic ones) for the purpose of vacationing, as is semi-common or even frequent among the middle and upper-middle class in developed countries. Supposedly seeing other countries is good for personal development (although I am somewhat skeptical of this), but is it worth the environmental cost? I also think it's problematic how such tourism commodifies/commercializes the culture of local people groups, but that's a different issue. Of course billionaires taking their private jets to escape city traffic and what not are likely a much bigger problem.

    2 votes
  9. Comment on Reddit is finally facing its legacy of racism in ~tech

    Turtle
    Link Parent
    Not to detract from your message but this isn't actually a big issue now as the mods have pretty much shut it down and transferred it to it's own site, thedonald.win. See: basically no user...

    see the altright sub r/the_donald get a free pass year after year

    Not to detract from your message but this isn't actually a big issue now as the mods have pretty much shut it down and transferred it to it's own site, thedonald.win. See: basically no user activity since 2 months ago (actually there is one mod post from 2 weeks ago so nvm but it's still virtually dead).

    7 votes
  10. Comment on After ten years in tech isolation, I’m now outsider to things I once had mastered in ~tech

    Turtle
    Link Parent
    I mean we'd supply them with food and water. You could live fairly "luxuriously" by camping standards for less than $5000 a year, which is way less than what it costs to house someone in a prison.

    Also, I think you're VASTLY underestimating the difficulty in surviving on your own. Like, by an insane amount.

    I mean we'd supply them with food and water. You could live fairly "luxuriously" by camping standards for less than $5000 a year, which is way less than what it costs to house someone in a prison.

    2 votes
  11. Comment on Twitter aims to limit people sharing articles they have not read in ~tech

    Turtle
    Link

    Twitter is trying to stop people from sharing articles they have not read, in an experiment the company hopes will “promote informed discussion” on social media.

    In the test, pushed to some users on Android devices, the company is introducing a prompt asking people if they really want to retweet a link that they have not tapped on.

  12. Comment on Inside Seattle's Autonomous Zone in ~news

    Turtle
    Link Parent
    Is this person credible? If so that is quite disturbing.

    Is this person credible? If so that is quite disturbing.

    4 votes
  13. Comment on After ten years in tech isolation, I’m now outsider to things I once had mastered in ~tech

    Turtle
    Link Parent
    Maybe not a cure, but at least anecdotally, extended periods of time in nature is very therapeutic. I think it would help. Anyways, I'm not even talking about exiling such people so it's not...

    Maybe not a cure, but at least anecdotally, extended periods of time in nature is very therapeutic. I think it would help. Anyways, I'm not even talking about exiling such people so it's not really relevant.

  14. Comment on After ten years in tech isolation, I’m now outsider to things I once had mastered in ~tech

    Turtle
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    The US government owns over 200 million acres. I'm sure at least some of it is habitable. And if not, I would think we have the resources to buy an adequate amount (assuming we're limiting exile...

    Uh, given that the intersection between "habitable" and "has no humans" is prettttyyy thin by now

    The US government owns over 200 million acres. I'm sure at least some of it is habitable. And if not, I would think we have the resources to buy an adequate amount (assuming we're limiting exile to those who truly can't be rehabilitated).

    And honestly I'm pretty sure putting someone with no survival skills in a wilderness counts as cruel or unusual, which is barred by the constitution.

    Survival isn't really all that difficult with the right gear in a forgiving climate. And even if that was true, I would assume it would be even more so of traditional imprisonment?

    3 votes
  15. Comment on After ten years in tech isolation, I’m now outsider to things I once had mastered in ~tech

    Turtle
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I was mostly talking about "particularly dangerous individuals" who can't be rehabilitated. Although I disagree that exile can't be rehabilitative (when I say "exile" I'm thinking dropping someone...

    I was mostly talking about "particularly dangerous individuals" who can't be rehabilitated. Although I disagree that exile can't be rehabilitative (when I say "exile" I'm thinking dropping someone off in the middle of some secluded natural area, probably with some camping/survival gear, maybe a heart rate monitor/GPS tracker, not just kicking them into a bordering country). I think a few months or years in nature could do a lot of good for non violent offenders. Their crimes are often crimes of despair or desperation, and such a punishment could help alleviate some of that.

  16. Comment on After ten years in tech isolation, I’m now outsider to things I once had mastered in ~tech

    Turtle
    (edited )
    Link Parent
    I think exile seems like a decent alternative. It would be both cheaper and more humane, while still protecting society from particularly dangerous individuals. But to where? edit: (ok maybe this...

    I think exile seems like a decent alternative. It would be both cheaper and more humane, while still protecting society from particularly dangerous individuals. But to where?

    edit: (ok maybe this was a dumb idea.)

    3 votes
  17. Comment on US on path to widespread political violence in ~news

    Turtle
    (edited )
    Link
    Countries facing economic crisis and inter-group conflict – as the United States currently is due to the economic fallout of the ongoing pandemic and racial justice protests – can quickly descend...

    Countries facing economic crisis and inter-group conflict – as the United States currently is due to the economic fallout of the ongoing pandemic and racial justice protests – can quickly descend into mass violence. This is especially true when political leaders flout the outcome of elections or repeatedly inflame social tensions during a period of acute inter-group tension, as is the case with Trump’s repeated inflammatory acts and statements. For example, as the governments in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda lost control of their territory, the heads of state of both Serbia (Slobodan Milošević) and Rwanda (Jean Kambanda) publicly called for state security forces and, pertinently, armed civilian militias to attack targeted groups en masse. Both of these conflicts rapidly escalated into catastrophic atrocities, inflicting deep wounds that are still mending today.
    [...]
    There is a voluminous literature on the main risk factors indicating an increased likelihood of state-sponsored mass atrocities against civilians (see e.g. here and here). We are worried that key indicators are now evident, and in fact increasing, in the United States. Prime examples include:

    • Rising social and economic inequality.
    • Worsening or historically woeful economic conditions.
    • A surge of inflammatory political rhetoric, including at the highest levels of government.
    • The creation of, or increased support for, armed militias or paramilitary groups.
    • Racial or ethnic tensions, including a history of intergroup conflict.
    • The stark polarization of political parties along mainly racial or religious lines.
    • A loss of faith in the electoral system and/or a lack of free and fair elections.
    • A near-term major national election.
    5 votes