daturkel's recent activity

  1. Comment on What are your favorite non-fiction audiobooks? in ~books

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    I've never heard of Why We Sleep before but that one sounds right up my alley. Dreamland sounds like a bit of a downer, but I guess that's reality... Some other books I've enjoyed: Voices from...

    I've never heard of Why We Sleep before but that one sounds right up my alley. Dreamland sounds like a bit of a downer, but I guess that's reality...

    Some other books I've enjoyed:

    • Voices from Chernobyl by Svetlana Alexievich
    • Say Nothing, A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland by Patrick Radden Keefe
    • Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain
    • How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg
    3 votes
  2. Comment on What are your favorite non-fiction audiobooks? in ~books

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    I've enjoyed a few Bill Bryson books but I haven't read this one so I'll check it out (literally, I'll check it out from my library's app).

    I've enjoyed a few Bill Bryson books but I haven't read this one so I'll check it out (literally, I'll check it out from my library's app).

    4 votes
  3. What are your favorite non-fiction audiobooks?

    I'm about to finish my semester and, since I've been taking a lot of walks lately, I figured I should listen to some audiobooks. In particular, I'd love some suggestions for nonfiction audiobooks....

    I'm about to finish my semester and, since I've been taking a lot of walks lately, I figured I should listen to some audiobooks. In particular, I'd love some suggestions for nonfiction audiobooks. I recently read Boom Town by Sam Anderson, a sort of pop history about Oklahoma City and its basketball team, and I listened to Silver Screen Fiend, by Patton Oswalt, about his addiction to movies.

    Are there any audiobooks you recommend? Preferably they would be good books that also have particularly good audio versions (well-produced).

    Thanks!

    10 votes
  4. Comment on What are your internet time sinks? in ~talk

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    Very cool! Is it open source?

    Very cool! Is it open source?

    3 votes
  5. Comment on What's your favorite defunct website? in ~talk

    daturkel
    Link
    I remember really enjoying AllTooFlat, a humor site from the early 2000s. The site's still up but there hasn't been new stuff in over a decade, but it used to crack me up. Same with EmotionEric, a...

    I remember really enjoying AllTooFlat, a humor site from the early 2000s. The site's still up but there hasn't been new stuff in over a decade, but it used to crack me up. Same with EmotionEric, a site with a simple premise: a guy takes funny pictures of himself conveying different emotions.

    As a kid I was a huge fan of this Zelda website called "The Odyssey of Hyule". It was in many ways like a magazine, with letters of the week and so on. I remember a pretty decent hoax about how to obtain the Triforce in Ocarina of Time really blew my mind at the time.

    For bigger sites, I miss 1UP.com, where I used to love the forums. Gawker cracked me up every day. I was addicted to Flashplayer.com, which was a Newgrounds-esque hub of Flash game activity.

    And of course what.cd. Between rise of services like Spotify and the fact that I'm no longer a morally dubious teenager without money to buy music, music piracy has no place in my life anymore, but what.cd was still the best music community I've ever seen. The forums were a really fantastic place to learn about and discover new music, and I'm so lucky to have access to it at a time where all I wanted to do was hear new stuff.

  6. Comment on <deleted topic> in ~games

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    I am too, but I was able to read it here.

    I am too, but I was able to read it here.

    1 vote
  7. Comment on What games have you been playing, and what's your opinion on them? in ~games

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    Wow I'd never heard of this one. I loved TIS-100 (though I'm sure I didn't beat it), so I'm eager to give this one a shot.

    Wow I'd never heard of this one. I loved TIS-100 (though I'm sure I didn't beat it), so I'm eager to give this one a shot.

    3 votes
  8. Comment on Lambda School's misleading promises in ~tech

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    I'm mixed on this. Obviously this specific guy turned out not to be well suited to the task, but some people really excel at starting and growing companies and they're capable of finding people...

    I'm mixed on this. Obviously this specific guy turned out not to be well suited to the task, but some people really excel at starting and growing companies and they're capable of finding people with the relevant expertise to advise them and run aspects of companies that require that knowledge. We see the reverse situation too: in the earlyish days of Facebook when it was clear that even if Zuckerberg knew how to build a cool app, he didn't really know how to make money, and Sheryl Sandberg was brought in to help fill that gap.

    1 vote
  9. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    This sounds a lot like what I just did for the first time (see my comment in this very same thread here). I used FastAPI instead of Flask, but the fundamentals are the same (I think). While Flask...

    This sounds a lot like what I just did for the first time (see my comment in this very same thread here).

    I used FastAPI instead of Flask, but the fundamentals are the same (I think). While Flask lets you create html from jinja templates, you can also do the web side as ordinary html, make calls to Flask with jQuery (or whatever async javascript you want), and then use the response from the call to change things on the webpage.

    You can take a look at my code on github: https://github.com/daturkel/snippet.dog

    1 vote
  10. Comment on What programming/technical projects have you been working on? in ~comp

    daturkel
    (edited )
    Link
    I made my first web app this weekend, Snippet Dog. It takes a code snippet, formats it with syntax highlighting, and gives you html and css so you can put it on a static site without the need for...

    I made my first web app this weekend, Snippet Dog. It takes a code snippet, formats it with syntax highlighting, and gives you html and css so you can put it on a static site without the need for a JS syntax highlighter.

    It still needs a little instructional text and I have a few backend tweaks I'd like to make but it's effectively feature complete. I used FastAPI and Pygments for the backend, a little jQuery glue code to make the requests, and deployed it behind nginx on a digital ocean droplet.

    I hadn't used FastAPI before but the real challenge for me was the deployment part, getting nginx to forward requests to the port exposed by the docker container and so on. I'm sure I didn't do it the best possible way but it works ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    3 votes
  11. Comment on Website puzzle that was posted to Tildes? in ~games

    daturkel
    Link
    I never saw the original thread, but there are lots of puzzles like that. One of the older ones is called not pron. Folks on Quora discussed similar games. The most hardcore game along those lines...

    I never saw the original thread, but there are lots of puzzles like that. One of the older ones is called not pron. Folks on Quora discussed similar games.

    The most hardcore game along those lines is Cicada 3301. It's a massive online puzzle, the most recent iteration of which still isn't solved. More generally, lots of "alternate reality games" or ARGs feature puzzles similar involving stuff like viewing the page source or solving riddles to find the next url.

    3 votes
  12. What is your default sort for Tildes?

    Pretty much self explanatory: what did you set for your default tildes.net post sort? I currently have it set to top activity in the last three days, but I'm not sure if that's the optimal way to...

    Pretty much self explanatory: what did you set for your default tildes.net post sort?

    I currently have it set to top activity in the last three days, but I'm not sure if that's the optimal way to find posts that are likely to have ongoing conversation. On the other hand, filtering to just the past day often eliminates too many posts.

    12 votes
  13. Comment on Is Catalina a good upgrade yet? in ~tech

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    Even though technology evolves very quickly and web development has seen especially rapid growth (see the recent Tildes post Old CSS, New CSS), there's something to be said for doing certain...

    Even though technology evolves very quickly and web development has seen especially rapid growth (see the recent Tildes post Old CSS, New CSS), there's something to be said for doing certain things the old way!

    HTML and CSS are still the core languages of the web and don't require any special tooling. The workflow you describe is very similar to mine—the only reason it's nice to use a local http server even for simple static sites is that it makes it easier to have relative paths in your html that won't work if you just open the files in your browser.

    1 vote
  14. Comment on Is Catalina a good upgrade yet? in ~tech

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    I didn't realize Dreamweaver was even still around—what features do you use? Is your site static? If so then as aphoenix said, pretty much any editor you're comfortable in will do. If you like...

    I didn't realize Dreamweaver was even still around—what features do you use? Is your site static? If so then as aphoenix said, pretty much any editor you're comfortable in will do. If you like previewing, you could always use the language of your choice to serve up your site directory locally: https://gist.github.com/willurd/5720255

    2 votes
  15. Comment on Bojack Horseman - Season 6B - Discussion Thread in ~tv

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    A part of that is the show's critique of Hollywood / showbiz and the way society often does forgive his (and others') transgressions in a way that ultimately lets him off the hook and hamstrings...

    A part of that is the show's critique of Hollywood / showbiz and the way society often does forgive his (and others') transgressions in a way that ultimately lets him off the hook and hamstrings his growth. He was on the right track when he left Hollywood to teach, and the fact that there's still this avenue back into showbiz for him and there is an appetite for the inane Horny Unicorn actually poses a huge threat to his growth that PC sees but he might not.

    2 votes
  16. Comment on Bojack Horseman - Season 6B - Discussion Thread in ~tv

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    He's definitely his own worst enemy, and he is a he cause of all his problems—as everyone always has to tell him. But I'm hesitant to say that his decision to go back for the second interview is...

    He's definitely his own worst enemy, and he is a he cause of all his problems—as everyone always has to tell him. But I'm hesitant to say that his decision to go back for the second interview is the final word on who he is at the end of the show though. That moment was kind of the same idea as him being overbearing with Hollyhock at Wesleyan—he's so excited about the idea of himself as a good person that he overdoes it and ends up in the wrong again. But I don't think we could say he's totally back to being his old bad self.

  17. Comment on Bojack Horseman - Season 6B - Discussion Thread in ~tv

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    I loved the way they handled Hollyhock. After the midseason finale where she's seconds from finding out this horrible story from Bojack's past, I was so anxious to see her reaction and how that...

    I loved the way they handled Hollyhock. After the midseason finale where she's seconds from finding out this horrible story from Bojack's past, I was so anxious to see her reaction and how that impacted their relationship. Bojack loves Hollyhock but, like Charlotte, I think he also sees his friendship with someone as "good" as her as some sign of goodness about himself, and that is likely going to be shattered again.

    But then, at Wesleyan, we aren't given that confrontation we expected. Hollyhock keeps what she knows from Bojack and instead of blowing up at him just slowly pulls away. Then for us to not even get to hear the letter, we're robbed even more of that resolution. Similarly we don't get closure on Paige and Max, or Gina, or tons of other people from this world, and we're left with this line that "Nothing matters at all, and everything matters so much." The specifics of Hollyhock's letter along with so many other details are irrelevant, but they reverberate in huge ways.

    8 votes
  18. Comment on Bojack Horseman - Season 6B - Discussion Thread in ~tv

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    That moment with PC was terrific, but the moment that hit me hardest was a few episodes earlier, the "sunk costs" speech from "Sunk Cost and All That." Bojack's in his Wesleyan office for what he...

    That moment with PC was terrific, but the moment that hit me hardest was a few episodes earlier, the "sunk costs" speech from "Sunk Cost and All That." Bojack's in his Wesleyan office for what he knows may be the last time, and only Princess Carolyn is left, helping him form a plan to confront the coming chaos.

    Bojack: This place was supposed to be a fresh start for me. Rehab was supposed to be a fresh start. No matter how many starts I get, it's always the same ending: everything falls apart and I end up alone.

    PC: I'm still here, Bojack.

    B: Why?

    PC: I don't know, I'm a fool, I guess. And you were my first client. And one time you were drunk and you smiled at me, and I said "what?" and you said "I just like being in a room with you. You make rooms good."

    B: You still do.

    PC steps in front of a whiteboard full of Bojack's failures, surrounding "Professor Horseman"

    PC: I have loved you for twenty-five years. And I never loved anyone better. That kind of love—you only get it when you're young and stupid. I'm not gonna get it again. And when I tell my daughter the story of the great love of my life, I want it to have a happy ending.

    B: Is it possible you letting me go is the happy ending?

    PC: I've gone with you this far. In for a penny, in for a pound, right? Sunk costs and all that?

    Bojack cringes

    B: Yeah. Sunk costs.

    There are several levels of brutality that make this scene so tough:

    • PC brings up the image of herself she wants her daughter to see, recalling the episode Ruthie, where she explains to Bojack how she makes up stories of her descendants talking about her one day, and when Bojack says that it isn't real, she contests that it makes her feel better. PC's "work-life balance" has always been a balance between a future life she envisions and a somewhat self-destructive present that she sees as the prerequisite to getting there, though it often makes it harder instead. And so here she's once again rationalizing how maybe helping Bojack (who's both her work, since he's her client, but also has never stopped being a part of her personal life) will enrich that future life and this time he's the one to tell her that that's the wrong move.
    • The line "I have loved you for twenty-five years" lands pretty hard on the viewer, but in the room with Bojack and PC, the love she professes to still holding for him is a foregone conclusion that's effectively ignored. Bojack's never been particularly sensitive to her feelings, and even in his seemingly enlightened state he doesn't acknowledge this confession, nor does she expect him to.
    • The above line is delivered in front of the brainstorming board of all the horrible things Bojack's done, which further drives home the contrast between her love of him and the destructive and self-destructive person he is. But looking back at it there's something even worse about the whiteboard: Bojack accidentally wrote "Professor Horseman" in Sharpie, and then he couldn't erase it. All his awful deeds around it—written in different colors—are presumably written with regular dry-erase markers. But this represents the exact opposite of the situation he finds himself in: these things from his past, things done by the version of himself he can't even recognize anymore and thought he'd left behind—those are the things that he can't erase and that he may never fully escape. And "Professor Horseman," this new idea of himself that he worked so hard to create, is on the verge of being erased completely.

    I really liked the full last season. The theme of Bojack being able to grow, but not escape who he was (and maybe still is), has been in place for the entire show and so it's fitting that it really gets driven home. I'm just reminded of a very early scene in the show where Bojack—in a somewhat self-serving attempt at confronting his old ghosts—reaches out to the ailing Herb Kazzaz to apologize to him, but Herb doesn't accept the apology, using words echoed by Diane this season that [he's] "not gonna be your prop so you can feel better."

    In fact, you'd probably sleep a lot better at night if you just admitted to yourself that you're a selfish goddamn coward who just takes whatever he wants and doesn't give a shit about who he hurts. That's you. That's BoJack Horseman.

    Bojack—and the viewer—spend the rest of the show trying to answer the question: is that who Bojack Horseman is? The finale leaves it as unclear as ever.

    I'd also recommend people read The Line and Dot's review of the last season. They put these things to words much better than I can.

    8 votes
  19. Comment on Greta Thunberg nominated for 2020 Nobel Peace Prize in ~enviro

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    Responding to both you and @pallas, I didn't think the article assigned any sort of undue importance to the news other than the acknowledgement that it happened. But nevertheless, as...

    Responding to both you and @pallas, I didn't think the article assigned any sort of undue importance to the news other than the acknowledgement that it happened. But nevertheless, as inconsequential as it might be in the abstract, I think both the announcement by the Swedish politicians and the posting of the article here were meant to create recognition and spur conversation. If you think there are important things related to Thunberg to discuss, this strikes me as a perfect opportunity to do so. If you think she does or does not deserve the prize, this would also be an appropriate time to raise that. But to say "well, the nomination process is a formality and these stories aren't predictive" seemed to me to shut down that conversation before it could happen.

    1 vote
  20. Comment on Greta Thunberg nominated for 2020 Nobel Peace Prize in ~enviro

    daturkel
    Link Parent
    The first sentence of the linked article explains exactly how she was nominated: It's possible others nominated her too. I don't think anyone would argue that Thunberg has caused the deaths of...

    The first sentence of the linked article explains exactly how she was nominated:

    Two Swedish MPs have nominated Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg, and the Fridays For Future protest movement she began, for 2020’s Nobel Peace Prize, TT agency reported citing a letter from Swedish parliamentarians.

    It's possible others nominated her too.

    I don't think anyone would argue that Thunberg has caused the deaths of millions, so I'm not sure where you're going with that line. If the answer is "the nominations aren't always reasonable," I guess that's all well and good, but feels somewhat tangential unless you have an argument that Thunberg is one such example.

    5 votes