papasquat's recent activity

  1. Comment on Riot’s Vanguard comes to League in ~games

    papasquat
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    It isn't. If you have root on a machine, you have the keys to the kingdom. There's no way to stop you from having full visibility of everything that machine is doing, including any sort of...

    It isn't. If you have root on a machine, you have the keys to the kingdom. There's no way to stop you from having full visibility of everything that machine is doing, including any sort of "sandbox" you try to set up. At the end of the day, every process, whether its virtualized, sandboxed, containerized, jailed or whatever other isolation technology you're using is writing bits to memory. Whoever has root on a system level has full visibility into that memory. There are memory obfuscation techniques, but there are also ways around those techniques.

    The only way to hide what a process is doing from a user is to not give that user root on their computer. Personally, I would never, ever buy a general use computer that I didn't get to have root on. That's why I say the only true way around this problem is some sort of locked down, limited platform, like a console.

    2 votes
  2. Comment on Riot’s Vanguard comes to League in ~games

    papasquat
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    Anticheat is a very, very hard problem to solve. Fundamentally, the goals of allowing users to have full control over their endpoints and controlling how those endpoints interact with network...

    Anticheat is a very, very hard problem to solve. Fundamentally, the goals of allowing users to have full control over their endpoints and controlling how those endpoints interact with network services are wholly incompatible, so my thoughts on PC anticheat are so horribly conflicted.

    I think both sides of the argument have a lot of half truths that get peddled. On the open source, freedom respecting side, I often hear the argument that you don't need kernel level anticheat, that it's not effective, and that there are much better, more effective ways to do what they want to do.

    That really isn't the case, as far as I've seen. I haven't seen any effective technique that allows a process to shield it's memory from being read or manipulated by software running at a higher privilege level except for the software that prevents this from happening running at an even higher privilege level. Are there effective cheats that get around ring-0 anticheat? Yes, of course, but they're way harder to implement and require way more development expertise, and require letting some very shady characters full, complete access to your computer.

    On the other hand, I hear hardcore gamers say that Linux users should stop whining and get over it, that riot or blizzard or ea are totally trustworthy, and what's the big deal, what do we have to hide anyway?

    Personally I'm very, very uncomfortable with a game developer having access to my computer at such a deep level that they can damage hardware if they wanted to or if they did something wrong. It shouldn't be requirement to play a video game online.

    Ultimately I don't know what the solution is. I absolutely detest games with cheaters in them. It makes playing a competitive game feel totally pointless.

    The only real, true solution I could think of is having a dedicated, locked down "competitive gaming PC" platform that has a custom built OS with cryptographically signed hardware that cannot be modified without being detected, that is used for gaming, and only gaming, so it's not a big deal if it gets compromised. At that point though, you're basically just talking about a console, which also isn't my optimal way to play games.

    7 votes
  3. Comment on Truong My Lan: Vietnamese billionaire sentenced to death for $44bn fraud in ~finance

    papasquat
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    Well that's the issue, isn't it? The law doesn't apply to powerful people. That's the case everywhere. You're quite literally above the law if you're rich or powerful enough. What is written down...

    Well that's the issue, isn't it?

    The law doesn't apply to powerful people. That's the case everywhere. You're quite literally above the law if you're rich or powerful enough.

    What is written down as far as rules for what you can and cannot do stops applying to you once you have enough power. Those rules are for normal people like you and I.

    The only thing that matters when you're powerful is what other powerful people think of you; ie, politics.

    You can flagrantly break every law on the books in a jurisdiction. You can rape people, kill people, extort people, scam people and it doesn't matter one bit. You, or your powerful friends will either cover it up, make excuses for it, cook up a loophole for why that law doesn't apply to you, or even just straight up ignore it and pretend it didn't happen.

    On the other hand, you can be a relatively law abiding billionaire, but if you piss off the wrong person with enough power, you're done, regardless of whether you did or did not commit a crime.

    It doesn't matter where you live, this is how the world works. I think we, as adults intuitively know this, but there are various reasons we pretend we don't.

    We like to think we live in a world where the rule of law matters, or we want to live in a place where the good guys go free and then we guys are punished, or we have our own political goals and we pretend that laws apply to these powerful people to further those goals.

    At the end of the day we all understand this concept though. Laws literally don't exist for powerful people. They're a minor inconvenience at the very most.

    4 votes
  4. Comment on Truong My Lan: Vietnamese billionaire sentenced to death for $44bn fraud in ~finance

    papasquat
    Link Parent
    Yeah, realistically it's just not possible to amass billions of dollars without committing some crimes. You don't even have to be willfully ruthless (although I'd wager that all of them are). At...

    Yeah, realistically it's just not possible to amass billions of dollars without committing some crimes. You don't even have to be willfully ruthless (although I'd wager that all of them are). At that scale, your operation is so big, and the profit motives for the people who work for you is so strong, that processes that you're responsible for will break the law.

    It's normally not a big deal for you unless you just so happen to get on a more powerful competitors bad side. At that point, the law doesn't even matter anymore. All bets are off and anything is on the table.

    10 votes
  5. Comment on Ffmpeg and AV1 for HTML5 streaming in ~comp

    papasquat
    Link Parent
    "modern web technology" generally hasn't been progress in most people's opinions. I think a lot of people are saying that because a site that delivers mostly text being dozens of megabytes and...

    "modern web technology" generally hasn't been progress in most people's opinions. I think a lot of people are saying that because a site that delivers mostly text being dozens of megabytes and requiring massive, high clock speed proccessors is patently ridiculous.

    The argument has always been that excess processor time saves developer time, which is more expensive. As far as I've seen though, modern websites aren't any easier to develop than sites from 30 years ago were. If anything the opposite is true and the barrier to entry for web programming is higher than it's ever been.

    8 votes
  6. Comment on Many Americans who recently bought guns open to political violence, survey finds in ~misc

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    To me, this kind of research is sensationalist nonsense. The answers to a survey like this are less than meaningless, because they completely lack context. You have no idea what the mindset of the...

    To me, this kind of research is sensationalist nonsense.
    The answers to a survey like this are less than meaningless, because they completely lack context. You have no idea what the mindset of the responders was. What "political goals" are they referencing?

    If you asked most Americans whether our entry into WW2 was justified, I think the overwhelming answer would be yes. That was violence in persuit of a political objective.

    How many respondents to that survey were thinking about WW2 when they answered that question?

    I think if you asked most people "is political violence acceptable?", and then brought up examples referencing the civil war, WW2, the revolutionary war, or any other conflict that's been deemed "just", you could get virtually everyone to agree that yes, sometimes political violence is acceptable, because yes, obviously it is sometimes.

    Instead, stories like this seem to be reading into those answers and extrapolating that the respondents were actually talking about overthrowing the US government or shooting random liberals.

    I can't help but think that sensationalism isn't exactly an accident either.

    16 votes
  7. Comment on Indiana appeals court upholds injunction on abortion ban, citing religious liberty in ~health

    papasquat
    Link Parent
    The major difference is that there's never been a mandatory vaccine. There were restrictions on where unvaccinated people are allowed to go, because they presented a significantly higher risk of...

    The major difference is that there's never been a mandatory vaccine. There were restrictions on where unvaccinated people are allowed to go, because they presented a significantly higher risk of infection to everyone else, but no jurisdiction anywhere in the US ever forced people to get a vaccine.

    They are forcing women to not get abortions; something that only ever physically affects the woman and the fetus, which even if it had rights as a human being; wouldn't trump the rights of another person's bodily autonomy.

    6 votes
  8. Comment on Not every student needs Algebra 2. UC should be flexible on math requirement. in ~science

    papasquat
    Link Parent
    I will say, as someone who majored in IT and has worked in the field for over a decade, I've never once used algebra 2, or felt the need to use it, or higher level math in my career, which is...

    I will say, as someone who majored in IT and has worked in the field for over a decade, I've never once used algebra 2, or felt the need to use it, or higher level math in my career, which is ostensibly STEM (I still have no idea why the T is even part of the other three. It has basically nothing to do with them and requires a completely different set of skills, but I digress).

    However, I don't think I needed a degree for the work I've done in my field. I'm in management now, so maybe it helps a little? I learned far more about how to manage people effectively in the military than I ever did in college though.

    I think college in general being a minimum requirement for any white collar job is a waste of time and resources for most people. College used to be a place where upper middle and upper class people who had no pressure to earn a living went to mingle, and become more "well rounded." I think it still serves that function far better than it does as a job training program, which is what it serves as today.

    Realistically, I could have learned everything I needed to get started in the field in a year long training course, but I knew it would be tough to find jobs without a degree. Why does any IT job care that I took psychology 101, or had an elective in military history, or that I took a drawing class freshman year? Why is that a requirement?

    Highschool already serves as the baseline "this is what a well rounded person in our society should know" education level. Forcing people to spend 4 years learning things they'll never need in order to tollgate a knowledge based career (which is the only way to earn a reasonable living in this county without absolutely destroying your body) is just nonsensical in my opinion.

    So maybe it does make sense to continue requiring higher math in college. It doesn't make sense to require college for most jobs that require it today.

    Technology, finance, communications, marketing, accounting and so on are all things that we could set up expedited training courses for that take half the time or less and teach students what they need to be effective at their chosen career. No more, no less.

    And yes, I know that this exists to some degree already with AS degrees and other associates level qualifications. The issue is that for most people, that alone will not net them a job. Employers want a qualification that they can use to filter out most applicants from the very start, and for whatever reason a bachelors has become that qualification.

    5 votes
  9. Comment on What's something you've been mulling over recently? in ~talk

    papasquat
    Link Parent
    For me it greatly depends on the type of person. For 90% of people, I love hearing about their lives, and I don't feel like I'm a great conversationalist, so when I meet someone that's good at...

    For me it greatly depends on the type of person. For 90% of people, I love hearing about their lives, and I don't feel like I'm a great conversationalist, so when I meet someone that's good at talking, I'm always in awe and love being there.

    Sometimes though, I ask myself within five minutes, "why did I engage with this person." That usually happens when I talk to people who have an agenda to convert me to their ideology, whether that's telling me how great Andrew Tate is, or how the only way to get into heaven is by reading the Qur'an and these handful of hadiths. (Both real conversations that have been started by strangers, and both actually with somewhat similar themes).

    Even when those painful conversations are happening, there's some part of my brain that's going "Oh man this is going to be a GREAT story to talk about later"

    So actually, yeah, I pretty much always like it to some degree, but I'll only pursue it if someone responds favorably in an engaged way to my initial "hey there, how're you doing?" Otherwise I mostly just look around, daydream, or sleep.

    And I'm an aisle person. When I have to pee, it's an annoying urge that I absolutely cannot ignore that very quickly becomes unbearable. I hate having to wake people up to crawl over them to go to the bathroom. Although I do really like to look out of the window too.

    5 votes
  10. Comment on What's something you've been mulling over recently? in ~talk

    papasquat
    Link Parent
    You probably won't even play games on the flight most of the time. I'm an avid gamer, and there's few things I love doing more. I have a steam deck that I use regularly, and I take on most trips...

    You probably won't even play games on the flight most of the time.

    I'm an avid gamer, and there's few things I love doing more. I have a steam deck that I use regularly, and I take on most trips with me.

    Most flights, even long ones, I open the thing up, play a game for a little bit, then put it away after half an hour and end up sleeping, looking out the window, or just talking to the person next to me.

    I'm considering just not even bringing it anymore.

    8 votes
  11. Comment on Will the Apple antitrust case affect your phone’s security? in ~tech

    papasquat
    Link Parent
    I think computers and mobile devices are two entirely different conversations. There are a lot of really complex legacy, technological, and cultural reasons why most mobile app stores have the...

    I think computers and mobile devices are two entirely different conversations. There are a lot of really complex legacy, technological, and cultural reasons why most mobile app stores have the vast majority of the apps people would want to use on their devices, but computer app stores don't.

    1 vote
  12. Comment on Terraform Industries converts electricity and air into synthetic natural gas for the first time in ~enviro

    papasquat
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    I don't see how this tech ever would take off without strict regulations forcing it to. If you're already extracting hydrogen from the ground in order to produce methane, it would be far, far...

    I don't see how this tech ever would take off without strict regulations forcing it to.

    If you're already extracting hydrogen from the ground in order to produce methane, it would be far, far cheaper and easier to just... use the methane that comes with that hydrogen.

    I imagine that the only reason why they wouldn't do that is if it's illegal to do that, which is also the only reason this technology would ever be competitive with natural gas drilling in the real world.

    3 votes
  13. Comment on Will the Apple antitrust case affect your phone’s security? in ~tech

    papasquat
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    Honestly, they should coax. For 95% of users, there's no reason they can't just use an official app store app. Alternative app stores and side loading should be reserved for power users who know...

    Honestly, they should coax. For 95% of users, there's no reason they can't just use an official app store app. Alternative app stores and side loading should be reserved for power users who know what they're doing and can deal with a bit of nagging.

    2 votes
  14. Comment on Why x86 doesn’t need to die in ~comp

    papasquat
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    They could, but the heaps of extensions to the instruction set that modern applications all expect wouldn't be implemented. Intel routinely comes out with those extensions and tacks then into the...

    They could, but the heaps of extensions to the instruction set that modern applications all expect wouldn't be implemented.
    Intel routinely comes out with those extensions and tacks then into the base set, then operating systems and applications use them and expect them, and Intel and AMD get to keep their duopoly.

    The only reason why AMD is even in the game at all is because they violated Intel's parents, and after Intel took them to court, they settled with an agreement to allow AMD to continue making x86 chips. They then cemented themselves by developing x86-64 and allowing Intel to make chips with that architecture.

    Any lesser company would have just been sued to oblivion, and I doubt that nowadays any company would be able to get away with the stunt AMD pulled.

    That means that effectively, x86 can only be produced by two companies, which kills any real motivation Intel has to compete, because the costs of changing to an entirely new instruction set is so monumental.

    3 votes
  15. Comment on Venting doesn't reduce anger, but doing calming activities does, study finds in ~science

    papasquat
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    Venting isn't reflecting through. When someone is venting, they're just reliving whatever made them angry in the first place, assigning external blame, and just raging that the world is unfair. It...

    Venting isn't reflecting through. When someone is venting, they're just reliving whatever made them angry in the first place, assigning external blame, and just raging that the world is unfair. It almost by definition is a thought pattern that encourages helplessness. The core theme of a vent session is that the world is unfair, there's nothing you personally can do to fix it, and thus your anger is the only valid response.

    Reflection, on the other hand, implies something more productive. It involves examining your response to a situationn and evaluating what you could have done differently to not feel that way.

    It makes sense that one stokes anger, while the other reduces it.

    16 votes
  16. Comment on Why x86 doesn’t need to die in ~comp

    papasquat
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    Realistically, x86 likely could have been around forever and become the de-facto instruction set for basically any computing implementation. It's not going to be because Intel have been...

    Realistically, x86 likely could have been around forever and become the de-facto instruction set for basically any computing implementation. It's not going to be because Intel have been ridiculously litigious with their license, and have exploited new features that are patented and implemented into their chips to somehow refresh their patent expiration date. The 8086 was released in 1978. The patent on x86 should have expired decades ago, but it hasn't.

    Processors and computers in general are so complicated that switching to a different instruction set is such a massive, gargantuan effort that they're effectively natural monopolies, and probably should have been regulated that way. Failing that, patent law should have been fairly applied to Intel, and competitors should have been free to make x86 chips since the late 90s. Because neither of those things have happened, x86 never really existed in the mobile market, where so much development money has been invested. This is going to hurt Intel in the long run if the continuing trend towards more license friendly instruction sets holds, no matter what architecture they're built on.

    11 votes
  17. Comment on ‘Robot dog’ damaged by bullets during armed standoff in Barnstable, State Police say in ~tech

    papasquat
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    I don't really see how the robot is militant. It didn't have a weapon or even any protection from bullets. A 7 hour standoff with police where the suspect was firing bullets at them ended with...

    I don't really see how the robot is militant. It didn't have a weapon or even any protection from bullets. A 7 hour standoff with police where the suspect was firing bullets at them ended with zero injuries, including to the suspect, in part because of the robot.

    Obviously it's impossible to say what would have happened otherwise, but it's not a stretch to think that things could have been considerably more dangerous had armed officers been the first ones in instead of unarmed robots.

    12 votes
  18. Comment on ‘Robot dog’ damaged by bullets during armed standoff in Barnstable, State Police say in ~tech

    papasquat
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    I don't think most cops start their day hoping to use excessive force. I think most of the time that the police shoot someone, they're making a split second judgement call out of adrenaline and...

    I don't think most cops start their day hoping to use excessive force. I think most of the time that the police shoot someone, they're making a split second judgement call out of adrenaline and fear.

    I think it's even undersrandable in many cases. If I was in a situation where there's a very good chance I could get shot and die, and a chance I could get out on trial for using excessive force, I think in most cases, in that split second I'd choose to live too.

    Not being in harms way might let you think more rationally and take a few extra seconds to determine if a suspect is going into their jacket to grab a wallet versus a gun.

    5 votes
  19. Comment on Florida latest to restrict social media for kids as legal battle looms in ~tech

    papasquat
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    Apple and Google constantly have breaches. Every large technology company does, and that's including the ones that do it well. The average for IT security is much lower than Apple or Google...

    Apple and Google constantly have breaches. Every large technology company does, and that's including the ones that do it well.

    The average for IT security is much lower than Apple or Google though.

    Any company that everyone universally trusts to do this sort of service will eventually be breached, meaning real identities will eventually be tied to the most embarrassing online activity there is.

    It's not a good path to go down.

    5 votes
  20. Comment on It annoys me that so many PC games feel like they're intended for consoles in ~games

    papasquat
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    If it was too easy, auto aim on console based first person shooters wouldn't be ubiquitous.

    If it was too easy, auto aim on console based first person shooters wouldn't be ubiquitous.